Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 61.37
Liaison Remian Santos
Submission Date July 7, 2021

STARS v2.2

DE LA SALLE LIPA
OP-18: Waste Minimization and Diversion

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.64 / 8.00 Remian Santos
Director
Sustainability & Inclusive Education Directorate
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Figures needed to determine total waste generated (and diverted):
Performance Year Baseline Year
Materials recycled 0 Tonnes 0 Tonnes
Materials composted 7 Tonnes 10 Tonnes
Materials donated or re-sold 0 Tonnes 0 Tonnes
Materials disposed through post-recycling residual conversion 14 Tonnes 21 Tonnes
Materials disposed in a solid waste landfill or incinerator 364 Tonnes 343 Tonnes
Total waste generated 385 Tonnes 374 Tonnes

A brief description of the residual conversion facility:

De La Salle Lipa has an integrated Material Recovery Facility (MRF) that houses various waste recyclables. The MRF is composed of 4 sections that house the (1) recyclables - paper and cartoons (2) recyclables - plastics (3) temporary storage hazardous waste (4) items for re-use/donation.

An in-place Scrap, Surplus, and Low-Value Asset Disposal Policy guides school stakeholders on managing the institution's assets. The policy includes guidelines and procedures on assets redistribution to the institution, internal sale for re-use of employees and partners, donation, trade-in to vendors, external sale to the accredited hauler, and eventually disposal as waste.


Start and end dates of the performance year and baseline year (or three-year periods):
Start Date End Date
Performance Period Jan. 1, 2020 Dec. 31, 2020
Baseline Period Jan. 1, 2018 Dec. 31, 2018

A brief description of when and why the waste generation baseline was adopted:
---

Figures needed to determine "Weighted Campus Users”:
Performance Year Baseline Year
Number of students resident on-site 0 0
Number of employees resident on-site 0 0
Number of other individuals resident on-site 0 0
Total full-time equivalent student enrollment 9,862 10,715
Full-time equivalent of employees 616 795
Full-time equivalent of students enrolled exclusively in distance education 0 0
Weighted campus users 7,858.50 8,632.50

Total waste generated per weighted campus user:
Performance Year Baseline Year
Total waste generated per weighted campus user 385 Tonnes 374 Tonnes

Percentage reduction in total waste generated per weighted campus user from baseline:
0

Percentage of materials diverted from the landfill or incinerator by recycling, composting, donating or re-selling, performance year:
1.82

Percentage of materials diverted from the landfill or incinerator (including up to 10 percent attributable to post-recycling residual conversion):
5.45

In the waste figures reported above, has the institution recycled, composted, donated and/or re-sold the following materials?:
Yes or No
Paper, plastics, glass, metals, and other recyclable containers Yes
Food No
Cooking oil No
Plant materials Yes
Animal bedding No
White goods (i.e. appliances) Yes
Electronics Yes
Laboratory equipment Yes
Furniture Yes
Residence hall move-in/move-out waste No
Scrap metal Yes
Pallets Yes
Tires Yes
Other (please specify below) No

A brief description of other materials the institution has recycled, composted, donated and/or re-sold:

DLSL has an in-place Scrap, Surplus, and Low-Value Asset Disposal Policy that guides school stakeholders on managing the institution's assets. The policy includes guidelines and procedures on assets redistribution to the institution, internal sale for re-use of employees and partners, donation, trade-in to vendors, external sale to the accredited hauler, and eventually disposal as waste.

De La Salle Lipa, in the course of its operations, produces various wastes that are categorized based on its policy on Ecological Waste Management.

General Waste
Are domestic wastes that do not pose potential hazards or risks to health or the environment. Mostly derived in the course of DLSL daily operations composed of administrative, academic, and housekeeping wastes (wood, paper, plastics, etc.) and generally dealt with under the provisions of the Local City Environment and Natural Resources Office.

Anatomical Waste
a. Cultures and stocks of infectious and
biologically hazardous agents from
experimental laboratory works
b. Wastes from dissection of animals for
instructional purposes and usually treated with
formalin
c. Wastes from patients (e.g. excreta,
contaminated cotton balls, dressings from infected wounds, clothes soiled with human blood or other body fluids)
d. Domestic wastes like sanitary napkins and bathroom tissues
e. Wastes that may have been in contact with infected patients that have undergone diagnosis (e.g. tongue depressors, disposal gloves, laboratory gowns)
f. Any other wastes generated by the Institutional Health Services and Science/Nursing laboratories that are medical and dental in nature
g. Any other diagnostic or medical instruments that may have been in contact with infected persons

Chemical Waste
These include residual or discarded solid, liquid, or gaseous chemicals from laboratories on experimental works and from operations on cleaning, housekeeping, disinfecting procedures.
Chemical wastes from institutions may further be categorized as hazardous and non-hazardous. It is hazardous based on the following properties:
a. toxic
b. corrosive (e.g acids of pH<2 and base of pH>12
c. flammable and combustible
d. reactive (e.g. water-reactive, shock-sensitive, explosive)

Sharps
These include scalpels, broken glass, knives, nails, saws, blades, needles, syringes, infusion sets and any other items that can cause lacerations, cuts or puncture wounds. Regardless of whether contaminated or not, these items are usually considered hazardous.

Waste with heavy metal contents
These are considered a sub-category of hazardous chemical waste and are highly toxic. These include mercury wastes from broken thermometers, broken/busted fluorescent tubes, cadmium from discarded batteries.


Materials intended for disposal but subsequently recovered and reused on campus, performance year:
---

Does the institution use single stream recycling to collect standard recyclables in common areas?:
Yes

Does the institution use dual stream recycling to collect standard recyclables in common areas?:
Yes

Does the institution use multi-stream recycling to collect standard recyclables in common areas?:
Yes

Average contamination rate for the institution’s recycling program:
10

A brief description of any recycling quality control mechanisms employed:
---

A brief description of the institution's waste-related behavior change initiatives:

Wastes Minimization Guidelines:

DLSL shall commit itself to minimize the generation of wastes through REDUCTIONS, RECYCLING, and REUSE. The General Services Department (GSD) shall gather, record and monitor baseline data on disposal of various wastes.

On waste minimization strategies, a PERIODIC AWARENESS CAMPAIGN to all Lasallian partners shall be coordinate by GSD and Institutional Safety Office thru a multi-sectoral member of the DLSL community.

The following among others are possible measures to be done:

REDUCE at SOURCE
This pertains to the activities that either eliminate the use of a material or generate less waste:
- strengthening the campaign on “No to Styro Policy” and working closely with accredited Vendors for pick-up and collection of non-biodegradable packing materials (e.g. styro-packing materials)
- coordinating with Academe on the use of an alternative to chemicals used in the Science Laboratories.
- improved housekeeping practices to eliminate the use of toxic chemicals
- replacing or substituting a non-toxic, biodegradable cleaner for a hazardous chemical cleaner

Re-USE
This pertains to using a particular product or material over and over again (subject to evaluation maintenance cost) until it is no longer usable.

Re-CYCLE
This pertains to collecting waste materials and converting them into something new, like used wood products, plastics, papers, glass, metals, etc.

Clean As YOU Campaign and proper waste segregation on variously labeled trash bins are usually given emphasis during students' and employees' orientation.

Institutional Waste Materials Segregation
This pertains to collecting wastes, sorting them according to type at source, transporting them to MRF and designated compost pit area, keeping them isolated from each other. Segregation shall follow the following color coding:
A. Black - shall contain non-biodegradable, non-infectious, dry and residual wastes
B. Green - biodegradable, wet wastes
C. Yellow - infectious and potentially infectious wastes
D. Yellow with Black band - ch emical wastes including those with heavy metal


A brief description of the institution's waste audits and other initiatives to assess its materials management efforts and identify areas for improvement:
---

A brief description of the institution's procurement policies designed to prevent waste:

REDUCE at SOURCE
This pertains to the activities that either eliminate the use of a material or generate less waste:
- strengthening the campaign on “No to Styro Policy” and working closely with accredited Vendors for pick-up and collection of non-biodegradable packing materials (e.g. styro-packing materials)
- coordinating with Academe on the use of an alternative to chemicals used in the Science Laboratories.
- improved housekeeping practices (of contracted maintenance provider) to eliminate the use of toxic chemicals
- replacing or substituting non-toxic, biodegradable office supplies/cleaner for a hazardous chemical cleaner


A brief description of the institution's surplus department or formal office supplies exchange program that facilitates reuse of materials:

DLSL has an in-place Scrap, Surplus, and Low-Value Asset Disposal Policy that guides school stakeholders on managing the institution's assets. The policy includes guidelines and procedures on assets redistribution to the institution, internal sale for re-use of employees and partners, donation, trade-in to vendors, external sale to the accredited hauler, and eventually disposal as waste.


A brief description of the institution's platforms to encourage peer-to-peer exchange and reuse:
---

A brief description of the institution's limits on paper and ink consumption:
---

A brief description of the institution's initiatives to make materials available online by default rather than printing them:

A campaign tagged SAVE today, SAVE tomorrow, is published online and on social media of the school for information of school stakeholders.


A brief description of the institution's program to reduce residence hall move-in/move-out waste:
---

A brief description of the institution's programs or initiatives to recover and reuse other materials intended for disposal:

DLSL has an in-place Scrap, Surplus, and Low-Value Asset Disposal Policy that guides school stakeholders on managing the institution's assets. The policy includes guidelines and procedures on assets redistribution to the institution, internal sale for re-use of employees and partners, donation, trade-in to vendors, external sale to the accredited hauler, and eventually disposal as waste.


Website URL where information about the institution’s waste minimization and diversion efforts is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.