Overall Rating Reporter - expired
Overall Score
Liaison Greg Monaco
Submission Date Nov. 10, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Stony Brook University
OP-22: Waste Minimization

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Reporter Michael Youdelman
Recycling and Resource Mgmt
Recycling and Resource Mgmt
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Waste generated::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Materials recycled 14,366.60 Tons 68,895.79 Tons
Materials composted 12,124 Tons 1,899.96 Tons
Materials reused, donated or re-sold 0 Tons 0 Tons
Materials disposed in a solid waste landfill or incinerator 7,683 Tons 8,642.73 Tons

Figures needed to determine "Weighted Campus Users”::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Number of residential students 9,445 9,389
Number of residential employees 30 30
Number of in-patient hospital beds 603 540
Full-time equivalent enrollment 21,050 21,043
Full-time equivalent of employees 11,878 15,000
Full-time equivalent of distance education students 199 199

Start and end dates of the performance year and baseline year (or three-year periods):
Start Date End Date
Performance Year July 1, 2013 June 30, 2014
Baseline Year July 1, 2008 June 30, 2009

A brief description of when and why the waste generation baseline was adopted:

The waste generation baseline was adopted on July 1st, 2008 in order to help the University track its waste generation overtime.


A brief description of any (non-food) waste audits employed by the institution:

Participation in student waste projects, competitions, education campaigns and many more.


A brief description of any institutional procurement policies designed to prevent waste:

Janitorial paper and other paper supplies purchased by the University shall be composed of 100% post-consumer recycled content to the maximum extent practicable, and all copy and janitorial paper shall be process chlorine-free to the extent practicable. University publications shall be printed on 100% post-consumer recycled content paper. Where paper with 100% post-consumer recycled content is not available, or does not meet required form, function and utility, paper procurements shall use post-consumer recycled content to the extent practicable.


A brief description of any surplus department or formal office supplies exchange program that facilitates reuse of materials:

The Property Control Department maintains Stony Brook University's inventory of equipment records. University equipment items are physically identified annually, and the information pertaining to each item is updated in the State University of New York "Real Asset Management" system, RAM.

Real Asset Management (RAM) is a computerized inventory system used SUNY-wide for the purpose of tracking State and Research Foundation equipment. In addition, the Real Asset Management (RAM) contains specific information about all SUNY equipment with a threshold greater or equal to $ 5,000 and having a useful life of two or more years. It includes items purchased for State, Research Foundation, Hospital, LIVH and items received as gifts or donations to the University.


A brief description of the institution's efforts to make materials available online by default rather than printing them:

Blackboard is the University's online learning management system (LMS) that is designed to facilitate communication between students and instructors. It enables faculty to post their syllabus and other course-related materials in one place on the Web for student access.


A brief description of any limits on paper and ink consumption employed by the institution:

Students receive a print quota of 280 pages for each week (Monday – Sunday). Students who use up their quota may add money to their student card.


A brief description of any programs employed by the institution to reduce residence hall move-in/move-out waste:

Move Out/Free Cycle Cultural Awareness and Education Recycling

Held twice per year (end of each semester, the University residential move out program aims to collect reusable items in order to divert them from the waste stream. The University has helped to divert tons of items from the waste stream. These items are either donated to local charities or stored on campus until the following semester when they are redistributed to incoming students ("FreeCycle"). Students are encouraged to drop off reusable items such as books, paper, non perishable food items, office supplies, small appliances and electronics, shoes, clothing and linens into collection bins that are located temporarily in lobbies and common areas of all residential buildings. Students are typically very eager to participate, and to benefit from such offerings! What would otherwise be disposed of in a landfill, is instead sorted to be recycled, FreeCycled or donated


A brief description of any other (non-food) waste minimization strategies employed by the institution:

Participation in student waste projects, competitions, education campaigns and many more.


A brief description of any food waste audits employed by the institution:

Campus Dining produces food waste that they transport to the composter at Roth cafeteria, then FSA and Lackman staff use this waste and a bulking agent to make compost. COM helps with removing the final compost product and stores it for use on campus. Campus Dining participates in a program called Trim Trax which minimizes production waste, over production, unused/out-of-date inventory and open category waste opportunities.


A brief description of any programs and/or practices to track and reduce pre-consumer food waste in the form of kitchen food waste, prep waste and spoilage:

The Trim Trax program is designed to minimize food waste during the production process. Team members are asked to place all food trimmings into marked containers. Such trimmings include peels from cucumbers, apple cores, watermelon rinds and various other non-edible food waste, which often contain edible food trimmings that were mistakenly cut away. By collecting all waste and measuring the total, management can monitor how much edible food is being wasted. The program allows for continuous feedback and serves as a great educational tool for all involved.

Stony Brook University’s Campus Dining Services takes initiative to transform pre-consumer food waste into compost, which is then used in the University's Planting Program. Since early 2009-10, the University, Faculty Student Association (FSA) and Campus Dining Services have collaborated to develop and implement a pre-consumer food waste composting program using an aerobic compost vessel – which is a large, 20-foot long white cylindrical tank with sliding doors that stores and rotates "brewing" food waste which is then transformed into compost. During operation, the compost vessel spins slowly so that the food waste mixes and the interior of the vessel reaches approximately 160 degrees – which helps break the food waste down into nutrient rich compost. Once complete, the compost is then transferred to the R&D Park Greenhouse where it is held and eventually integrated into the University's Planting Program and is used to grow plants, saplings and flowers.


A brief description of programs and/or practices to track and reduce post-consumer food waste:

Unbleached Napkins
Reusable Mug and Sports Bottle Program
Biodegradable Cups, and Containers
SBU 100 Carts Using Local Produce and Local Vendors
Farmer’s Market
Campus Wide Events Such as Earthstock and Recyclemania
Support Local Economy Through Use of Nearby Vendors
Natural and Organic Snacks and Beverages
Trayless Brunch at Kelly Dining Center Reduces Waste and Saves Energy
Composting
Encourage Recycling and Educating about Sustainability
Trans-Free Oil Re-Used as Biodiesel
Recycling Bins Available in All Dining Locations
Sustainable Catering Options
Fair Trade Coffee


A brief description of the institution's provision of reusable and/or third party certified compostable to-go containers for to-go food and beverage items (in conjunction with a composting program):

Unbleached Napkins
Reusable Mug and Sports Bottle Program
Biodegradable Cups, and Containers
SBU 100 Carts Using Local Produce and Local Vendors
Farmer’s Market
Campus Wide Events Such as Earthstock and Recyclemania
Support Local Economy Through Use of Nearby Vendors
Natural and Organic Snacks and Beverages
Trayless Brunch at Kelly Dining Center Reduces Waste and Saves Energy
Composting
Encourage Recycling and Educating about Sustainability
Trans-Free Oil Re-Used as Biodiesel
Recycling Bins Available in All Dining Locations
Sustainable Catering Options
Fair Trade Coffee


A brief description of the institution's provision of reusable service ware for “dine in” meals and reusable and/or third party certified compostable service ware for to-go meals (in conjunction with a composting program):

Unbleached Napkins
Reusable Mug and Sports Bottle Program
Biodegradable Cups, and Containers
SBU 100 Carts Using Local Produce and Local Vendors
Farmer’s Market
Campus Wide Events Such as Earthstock and Recyclemania
Support Local Economy Through Use of Nearby Vendors
Natural and Organic Snacks and Beverages
Trayless Brunch at Kelly Dining Center Reduces Waste and Saves Energy
Composting
Encourage Recycling and Educating about Sustainability
Trans-Free Oil Re-Used as Biodiesel
Recycling Bins Available in All Dining Locations
Sustainable Catering Options
Fair Trade Coffee


A brief description of any discounts offered to customers who use reusable containers (e.g. mugs) instead of disposable or compostable containers in to-go food service operations:

In order minimize waste, promote reuse and lower its environmental impact, Stony Brook University and and Campus Dining Services offer an innovative “Reusable Mug & Sports Bottle Program.” Originally started in 2009, the program encourages students, faculty and staff to purchase a reusable mugs and/or sports bottles in order to reduce the amount of paper cups they use, which helps lower the amount of waste ending up in landfills.
The reusable mugs and sports bottles are made from polypropylene plastic and are resistant to acids such as hydrofluoric acid. The bottles are fully recyclable and fall under recycle symbol #5, which means that they can be recycled at SBU, and are dishwasher and microwave safe.
Students are given incentives to purchase and use the mugs and sports bottles, specifically a 35% discount on fountain drink refills at any SBU campus dining location.


A brief description of other dining services waste minimization programs and initiatives:

Unbleached Napkins
Reusable Mug and Sports Bottle Program
Biodegradable Cups, and Containers
SBU 100 Carts Using Local Produce and Local Vendors
Farmer’s Market
Campus Wide Events Such as Earthstock and Recyclemania
Support Local Economy Through Use of Nearby Vendors
Natural and Organic Snacks and Beverages
Trayless Brunch at Kelly Dining Center Reduces Waste and Saves Energy
Composting
Encourage Recycling and Educating about Sustainability
Trans-Free Oil Re-Used as Biodiesel
Recycling Bins Available in All Dining Locations
Sustainable Catering Options
Fair Trade Coffee


The website URL where information about the institution’s waste minimization initiatives is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.