Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 73.47
Liaison Ian McKeown
Submission Date March 30, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Loyola Marymount University
OP-23: Rainwater Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 Ian McKeown
Sustainability Officer
Facilities Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Which of the following best describes the institution’s approach to rainwater management?:
Comprehensive policies, plans or guidelines that require LID practices for all new projects

A brief description of the institution’s green infrastructure and LID practices:

In accordance with all local, State, and Federal mandates, LMU is in compliance with stormwater management regulations. Also, LMU has followed all provisions of our 20-year Master Plan, which discusses the importance of stormwater management for new construction projects, renovations, and other cases. Major renevations on landscaping have occured to remove concrete and green lawns to replace with pervious gravel and drought tollerant plants. We have green roofs, a rain barrels, campus gardens, and water capture locations, Prior to the start of soil-disturbing
activities for individual projects on campus, a Notice of Intent (NO!) and
Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan shall be prepared
in accordance with, and in order to partially fulfill, the California SWRCB Order No. 9-08- DWQ National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System General Permit
No. CAS000002 (General Construction Permit). The Storm Water Pollution Prevention
Plan shall meet the applicable provisions of Sections 301 and 402 of the Clean Water Act
and Chapter 6 Article 4.4, Storm Water and Urban Runoff Pollution Contro from the City
of Los Angeles Municipal Code by requiring controls of pollutant discharges that utilize best available technology economically achievable and best conventional
pollutant control technology to reduce the rate and quantity
of stormwater runoff. Examples of best available technology economically achievable and best conventional pollutant control technology that may be implemented during
site grading and construction could include straw hay bales, straw bale inlet filters,
filter barrier infiltration pits, stormwater cisterns, and silt fences. Additionally, other plans include, use of street sweeping to clean surfaces to prevent runoff.


A copy of the institution’s rainwater management policy, plan, and/or guidelines:
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A brief description of the institution’s rainwater management policy, plan, and/or guidelines that supports the responses above:

The Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan shall meet the applicable provisions of Sections 301 and 402 of the California Water Act and Chapter 6 Article 4.4, Stormwater and Urban Runoff Pollution Control from the Los Angeles Municipal Code, by requiring controls of pollutant discharges that utilize best available technology economically achievable and best conventional pollutant control technology to reduce pollutants.
Storm Water and Urban Runoff Pollution Control from the City of Los Angeles Municipal Code by requiring controls of pollutant discharges that utilize best available technology economically achievable and best conventional pollutant control technology to reduce the rate and quantity of stormwater runoff. Examples of best available technology economically achievable and best conventional pollutant control technology that may be implemented during site grading and construction could include straw hay bales, straw bale inlet filters, filter barrier infiltration pits, stormwater cisterns, and silt fences.
Prior to issuance of any grading or building permits for individual projects on campus, the City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works must approve the Standard Urban Storm Water Mitigation Plan


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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