Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Amy Butler
Submission Date Feb. 11, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Michigan State University
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Ann Erhardt
Chief Sustainability Officer
Infrastructure Planning and Facilities
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum No
+ Date Revised: March 21, 2016
---
+ Date Revised: March 21, 2016
Research (or other scholarship) No
+ Date Revised: March 21, 2016
No
+ Date Revised: March 21, 2016
Campus Engagement Yes Yes
Public Engagement Yes No
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food Yes Yes
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds Yes Yes
Purchasing No
+ Date Revised: March 21, 2016
No
+ Date Revised: March 21, 2016
Transportation Yes Yes
Waste Yes Yes
Water Yes Yes
Diversity and Affordability Yes Yes
Health, Wellbeing and Work Yes No
+ Date Revised: March 21, 2016
Investment --- ---
Other --- ---

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

Consistent with its mission to assist in the development of sustainable communities, the department offers three undergraduate majors linked by a common core in community sustainability. These three majors - Environmental Studies and Sustainability (ESS); Sustainable Parks, Recreation and Tourism (SPRT); and Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education (AFNRE) – share a set of courses centered on community sustainability. The CSUS graduate program offers two graduate majors: Community Sustainability (MS and PhD) and Sustainable Tourism and Protected Areas Management (MS and PhD). In both undergraduate and graduate programs, CSUS embraces international as well as domestic applications, engagement, and opportunities.

The Department of Community Sustainability (CSUS) offers two graduate programs and three degree types to domestic students and international students. 1. Community Sustainability (CSUS) 2. Sustainable Tourism and Protected Area Management (STPAM)


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

Competencies and associated learning outcomes for the Department of Community Sustainability undergraduate program include:

1. Critical thinking: Students will interpret, analyze and evaluate information generated by observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, and communication as a guide to formulate and defend responses to complex sustainability problems.

2. Systems Thinking: Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the interconnectedness of human and natural systems with the ability to anticipate and explain changes in complex

3. Economic literacy: Students will demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use economic theories and methods to recognize and evaluate tradeoffs inherent in decision-making for sustainability.

4. Ecological literacy: Students will demonstrate knowledge, skills and ability to apply the tools and concepts of ecological science to explain the interdependence between humans and ecosystems and the consequences of actions at various spatial and temporal scales.

5. Boundary-crossing: Students will identify their own assumptions and biases, recognize new perspectives, and demonstrate the ability to collaborate with individuals and groups whose norms, assumptions and biases are different from their own.

6. Community: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the various interpretations of community as it relates to the study and practice of sustainability

7. Equity: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the dynamics of social equality and inequality (equity) and how they affect sustainability.

8. Civic engagement: Students will develop the knowledge, skills, values, and motivation to participate in civic life.

9. Leadership: Students will develop, demonstrate and evaluate leadership practices that contribute to sustainability.

10. Initiative and practical skills: Students will demonstrate initiative, including the ability to self-direct and solve problems individually and as participants in larger group efforts.

11. Ethics: Students will evaluate and analyze diverse ethical positions on practical sustainability challenges.

Educational objectives for each major:

For the Environmental Studies and Sustainability (ESS) major, the educational objectives mirror those developed for the program (at higher level of accomplishment) plus:

• Students will demonstrate an understanding of how policies influence economic and social organization, how policies are made, and how citizens influence the policy process.

• Students will demonstrate competency in the use of analytical techniques, decision tools, evaluation methods, or other practical skills to be employed in professional and civil society organizations.

For the Sustainable Parks, Recreation and Tourism major (SPRT), additional educational objectives are adapted and strengthened from the basic standards of the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions (COAPART) (http://www.nrpa.org/Professional-Development/Accreditation/) published in November 2011, as follows:

• Students will understand the background, nature, and scope of the profession, including its history, philosophy, systems, ethics and social and behavioral science underpinnings.

• Students will understand how government, non-profits and commercial organizations provide services and experience opportunities for guests, visitors, participants, clients, or other constituent groups as shaped by a sense of community and civic engagement.

• Students will understand operations, management and administration in park, recreation and tourism systems that managers use to optimize the success of the organization within the external systems in which their organization operates. This includes demonstrating proficiency in communication, planning, organizing, staffing, leading, controlling, reporting, finance, resource acquisition, marketing and critical thinking.

• Students will in an integrated manner use the competencies noted in #3 to create, maintain, deploy and evaluate plans-of-action that address changing circumstances in social, economic, natural and financial environments, technology and competition.

• Students graduating from the program will understand and demonstrate the ability to design, implement, and evaluate services that facilitate targeted human experiences and that embrace personal and cultural dimensions of diversity.

• Students graduating from the program shall demonstrate, through a capstone comprehensive professional internship of not less than 400 clock hours and no fewer than ten weeks, the potential to succeed as professionals at supervisory or higher levels in park, recreation, tourism, or related organizations.

For the Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education, additional educational objectives are based on the Michigan Standards for Preparation of Teachers – Agriscience and Natural Resources (HX).
In summary, graduates of the program will fully understand and be able to apply:
• Program Development Content Knowledge
•Technical Content Knowledge
•Instructional Material Development Content Knowledge
•Program Management Content Knowledge
•Leadership Development content Knowledge
•Supervised Agricultural Experience Content Knowledge
•Career Education Content Knowledge
Details of specific learning outcomes under each of these categories is available at:
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=jq=standards%20for%20the%20preparation%20of%20teachers%20agriscience%20and%20natural%20resources%20%28hx%29&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCoQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.michigan.gov%2Fdocuments%2FSBE_AgriScience_%26_Natural_Resources_%28HX%29_103040_7.doc&ei=pd3mUevMMjkywGIm4FY&usg=AFQjCNFecsubqrK3BFahFR0c2AMC0UMLKQ&bvm=bv.49405654,d.aWc

In addition, students accepted into the Teacher Education program, in order to become certified teachers, will attain competencies required for Teacher Education in Agriculture by the American Association for Agricultural Education (AAAE). The AAAE standards and associated competencies can be found at:
http://www.aaaeonline.org/files/ncatestds.pdf


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

Department of Community Sustainability
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Michigan State Extension
AgBioResearch


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):

As part of a larger focus on water research at MSU and globally, the MSU WaterCube Program stimulates new multidisciplinary collaborations and novel water research ideas with minimal investment of college funds and faculty time spent on developing internal grant proposals. The program creates tokens, each worth $20,000 in research spending over two years, and awards them to individual faculty members. Faculty members then form teams of at least three token holders, one of whom must be new to the team, to create a WaterCube. Each WaterCube is thus provided with at least $60,000 to be spent over two years to pursue promising research ideas. Written proposals are not required – if members of a WaterCube agree on a worthy water project, then the project is a go. WaterCubes are expected to produce external grant proposals and peer-reviewed publications, and document evidence of progress through annual WaterCube meetings with peers.

The MSU Water Science Network is pleased to announce the final WaterCube teams! We are very excited to see the WaterCubes create new multidisciplinary collaborations and tackle novel water research ideas.
WaterCubes: Check here to see a list of funded WaterCubes

WaterCube Program description (pdf)

Faculty: click here for FAQs about how to participate

WaterCube Token Marketplace: click here to connect with token holders and others interested in the program

http://water.msu.edu/watercube/


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):

MSU-ESPP will monitor progress of each WaterCube. Each team will be required to participate in an annual meeting to report progress and products, to complete a short annual survey, and to produce a final report. We will use the following metrics to evaluate progress and success:
• Number of grant proposals submitted
• Number of grants awarded
• Number of peer-reviewed publications

Also, criteria of funding is monitored.
- Funds must be spend within 2 year period
- Teams must be interdisciplinary
- Research must result in peer reviewed publications
- Research must result in external funding proposals to continue research topics
- Research must result in documentation of evidentiary progress


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):

MSU Water Science Network - Various academic partners
http://water.msu.edu/


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:

Campus Engagement and Impact Assessment Plan (1-3 years)

Energy Transition Plan - Components of this plan include advancing research around energy sustainability, engagement of stakeholders, and improving the physical environment.

Campus Sustainability and its partners continuously work to engage the various stakeholder groups on campus. The programs listed below are either in development or have been running and are now in an continuous improvement stage of review.

The Spartan Green Certification program is designed to recognize, assist and promote units that are taking steps toward reducing their environmental footprint. This plan is activated annually and outcomes measured to continually improve the impact.

Spartan Green Event Certification will verify that your event is working to maximize recycling, minimize land-filled waste, reduce consumption, and ensure that products at the event are reused or re-purposed. Evaluating system and adding new layers of competencies and learning outcomes. Also adding broader range of viable areas.

Spartan EcoReps are faculty and staff members dedicated to helping MSU achieve its environmental and energy goals through peer education.

The Spartan Treasure Hunt is an early step in the building commissioning process. It engages building occupants to help identify opportunities for energy savings and system improvements.

Community Partnerships - MSU promotes its Be Spartan Green campaign both on and off campus by engaging communities in Greater Lansing through sustainable education and outreach.

Volunteer and Service Learning Program - There are many volunteering opportunities for those wishing to a make a positive impact on campus. Past opportunities have included event support, promoting recycling at athletic events and more.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:

Action planning for campus engagement is a requirement and derivative of our unit Strategic Planning process.

Assessment of campus engagement includes several survey instruments measuring student sustainability behavior and knowledge, building occupant engagement through Spartan Treasure Hunt measuring occupant behaviors and customer satisfaction.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):

Residential Hospitality Services
MSU Campus Sustainability
Infrastructure Planning and Facilities


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:

The Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in April 2012. The Plan has 3 goals - 1. Improve the Physical Environment; 2. Invest in Sustainable Energy Research and Development; and 3. Become and Educational Leader in Sustainable Energy.

In addition MSU Campus Sustainability focuses on external outreach for overall sustainability in its own strategic plan which includes an annual "conversation with the President" event inviting community stakeholders to engage with the energy/sustainability discussion on campus, sustainability recognition gala for community stakeholders, hosting various nationally coordinated engagement programs such as Power Dialog, etc.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):

The third goal of the Energy Transition Plan speaks to public engagement specifically. Strategies include: Educate stakeholders about MSU's longstanding commitment to and ongoing research in sustainable energy and Share MSU's energy transition process and lessons learned from it.

The MSU Campus Sustainability's strategic plan addressing public engagement includes the following strategy: Create a toolkit for community partners and peers (case studies, data, how to create Surplus/Recycling/Sustainability Program)


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities

MSU Campus Sustainability

University Administration - Office of the President and Office of Executive Vice President


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

The Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in April 2012. The Plan has 3 goals - 1. Improve the Physical Environment; 2. Invest in Sustainable Energy Research and Development; and 3. Become and Educational Leader in Sustainable Energy


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

Under the goal, Improve the Physical Environment, the campus goals are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by 2015, 45 percent by 2020, 55 percent by 2025, and 65 percent by 2030. Strategies include energy conservation at the central power plant and in buildings, implementing a smart growth strategy, implementing more aggressive building energy standards, fuel switching, green power purchases, implementing renewable technology, and utilizing carbon offsets.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

IInfrastructure Planning and Facilities

MSU Campus Sustainability

University Administration - Office of the President and Office of Executive Vice President


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

The Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in April 2012. The Plan has 3 goals - 1. Improve the Physical Environment; 2. Invest in Sustainable Energy Research and Development; and 3. Become and Educational Leader in Sustainable Energy

In addition, MSU has committed to the DOE Better Buildings Challenge which MSU is working toward a 20% reduction in energy demand (EUI) in 20 million square feet of built space by 2020. http://ipf.msu.edu/green/energy/building-efficiency/better-buildings-challenge.html

Energy policy - The heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems across campus are scheduled to run at specific times to attain occupant comfort while avoiding waste.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

MSU tracks energy consumption in individual buildings. The university is reducing its energy consumption as part of its commitment to the Better Buildings Challenge, which can be read about on the Building efficiency page. The information below tells how the university regulates and monitors power usage.

Specific strategies in the plan related to buildings include: implement a smart growth strategy to minimize the amount of new square footage added to the campus, create a system that connects energy, space costs, and incentives to the end users, and implement more aggressive building energy standards.

See Campus Master Plan http://ipf.msu.edu/resources/campus-master-plan/index.html

http://ipf.msu.edu/green/energy/consumption.html


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities
Facilities Planning and Space Management
Campus Planning & Administration


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:

Residential and Hospitality Services (RHS) includes operations of residence halls, dining facilities, food procurement, hotel, golf course, tennis, entertainment and other auxiliary services. RHS's sustainability visioning statement is, "Ensuring MSU's long-term sustainability through innovative and balanced strategies that support stewardship, fiscal responsibility and partnership."

RHS Strategic Plan includes a section on Sustainability and has recently added three imperatives for Residential Education to expand student engagement with sustainability in housing.

RHS lists strategies for energy conservation and water conservation, food wast reduction, sustainable procurement, material diversion, social responsibility, and connecting sustainability education and research.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

The following is an excerpt from the RHS Sustainability Plan.

Food Waste Strategies
- Assist with closing the food loop and be cognizant of how food waste ties into energy
- Support efforts to reduce food waste, reduce food cost, review portion control, increase education and other tactics
- Review cost impacts of controlling food waste
- Implement and monitor trayless dining at Shaw and Yakeley; encourage trayless in other venues

Sustainable Procurement Strategies
- Increase local/regional purchasing strategies when fiscally able and available
- Know where our food and other products come from and how they are manufactured
- Track what our vendors do related to sustainability and recognize impacts, track and monitor
- Be knowledgeable of sustainable certifications and standards such as LEED, Forest Stewardship Council, Marine Stewardship, Certified Organic, Energy Star, Water Sense, etc.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

Residential and Hospitality Services


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

The Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in April 2012. The Plan has 3 goals - 1. Improve the Physical Environment; 2. Invest in Sustainable Energy Research and Development; and 3. Become and Educational Leader in Sustainable Energy.

MSU also has a Master Utility Plan for the campus which includes planning for power plant infrastructure, future of energy generation on campus, and meeting demand in a sustainable manner. This is a long range plan.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

Under the goal, Improve the Physical Environment, the campus goals are to increase the campus' renewable energy to 15 percent by 2015, 20 percent by 2020, 25 percent by 2025, and 40 percent by 2030. Strategies include energy conservation at the central power plant and in buildings, implementing a smart growth strategy, implementing more aggressive building energy standards, fuel switching, green power purchases, implementing renewable technology, and utilizing carbon offsets.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities
MSU Campus Sustainability


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

Campus Master Plan - Land Use, Zoning, and Transportation Sustainability
http://ipf.msu.edu/resources/campus-master-plan/index.html

Michigan State University is known for its beautiful campus. It is even one of the aspects touted on the president’s website. The Landscape Services department balances the university’s operational and aesthetic missions while using environmentally-friendly practices in grounds care and upkeep.

Biofuel from waste- Landscape waste such as mulch is being used as a source of biofuel in the T.B. Simon Power Plant. It is combined with coal to reduce the amount of total coal used. In addition to being a cleaner source of fuel, the woody material is a renewable resource from campus landscape. As much as 8,000 to 9,000 tons of wood chips are used as biofuel annually. Learn more about how MSU generates power.

Stormwater management - Several landscaping solutions are used to manage stormwater runoff to naturally cleanse the water and to reduce the risk of flooding.
Trees: a valuable asset

Trees are one of the most valuable natural energy-savers on campus. Shading reduces cooling costs. They act as windbreaks, which reduces heating costs. Trees also reduce heat islands that occur over hard surfaces in urban environments. Since trees are such a valuable resource, MSU takes special means to protect trees in construction areas and tailgate zones. In some instances, trees have been relocated to accommodate for a new building while preserving the tree. A technique called air spading allows the entire root system to be exposed without damage, the correct planting depth and root flare to be identified and the tree to continue to flourish after transplant.

Preventing “cowpaths,” protecting trees - Certain areas of the MSU campus are marked with infamous “cowpaths” of pedestrians that choose to take a shorter walk across green space than stick to installed sidewalks. Sidewalk placement follows these natural walking trails when possible. However, in areas with extensive tree root systems that weave underground, concrete cannot be used or the roots would be suffocated. As an alternate solution, rubber sidewalk was installed. The implementation was successful.

Academic mission - In the greenhouse near Bailey Hall, chefs that work for Residential and Hospitality Services grow herbs that are then used directly in campus cooking, reducing the costs and fuel use of transportation and packaging. Students intern within the greenhouse and work with the chef as part of their academic programs.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

- Water conservation measurements and tracking of water use per operation
- % green space and % tree canopy
-% biofuel produced, collected on campus and converted to energy

IPF Annual report
http://ipf.msu.edu/_files/pdfs/reports/facilities-and-infrastructure-report-2015.pdf

Campus Beautification Plan
http://ipf.msu.edu/resources/facilities-infrastructure-reports/campus-beautification.html


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities (Landscape Services)
Campus Planning & Administration


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:

Sustainable Procurement (MSU Purchasing) Our Commitment to Sustainability & Be Spartan Green

University Services upholds MSU’s commitment to sustainability by encouraging the procurement of environmentally preferred goods and services.

As responsible stewards of the environment, MSU Purchasing:
- uses local/regional suppliers to obtain goods and services, whenever possiblez
- co-hosted 2011 and 2014 Supplier Sustainability workshops
- monitors recycled content paper usage on campus
- analyzes the MSU's supply chain to measure top suppliers carbon emissions and
water usage
- engages with MSU School of Supply Chain Management
- includes instructions or requirements when negotiating agreements and contracts to
use environmentally-friendly packaging and processes. When possible, Purchasing
asks that packaging materials be made of materials that are sustainable, recyclable, reusable,and analyzes at the upstream points along the supply chain to understand how products are manufactured and transported and what that impact is on the environment
provides assistance in obtaining the most energy-efficient equipment.

University Services is advancing sustainability in Purchasing by establishing and supporting a Sustainable Purchasing Committee/Team, dedicating staff and graduate level students to research methods to improve purchasing, invested in a semi-annual TruCost analysis of purchasing to identify areas of improvement (3rd iteration will be completed Dec. 2015), and developing network of suppliers to not only contribute to the sustainability of purchased products but also provide those products.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):

Establish committee for bi-weekly meetings - Starting Fall 2015
Complete TruCost Study 2015
Publish research study on methods to improve process - TBD
Increase % of sustainable products
Reduce Cost - Spend on less or non sustainable products
Tracking consolidated UPS/Fed Ex Delivery Routes + Emissions Survey
Measuring % environmentally responsible packaging for ordered products
% Recycled Paper Content
Warehouse utilization and energy efficiency


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):

University Services
MSU Campus Sustainability
Infrastructure Planning and Facilities


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:

Transportation Services is a department of Infrastructure Planning and Facilities (IPF). As part of IPF and in support of IPF's mission to create a more sustainable campus, Transportation services is committed to reducing its carbon footprint by using and promoting clean transportation. Currently MSU Transportation is improving sustainability by increasing #of fuel efficient vehicles in fleet, increased average MPG, and reducing carbon emissions through technology and efficient patterns of travel on campus. Also plans to increase bike and public transportation ridership are in progress.

Future plans will include the development of a Transportation Demand Management plan as part of a larger climate action/preparedness plan.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):

# of fuel efficient and hybrids in fleet - work to increase
Average MPG of fleet - work to increase MPG
Gallons of Fuel per year and operation
Emissions Tracking (GHG)
# of bikes on campus + # of riders per capita
# of rides on public transportation + per capita


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities
MSU Campus Sustainability
MSU Bikes
Campus Planning and Administration


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

The mission of MSU’s Recycling Operation is to develop, provide and nurture environmentally, socially and economically sustainable solid waste management solutions for Michigan State University and the local campus community.

MSU Recycling has implemented a 5 year plan to increase landfill diversion to 70% by 2017.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

Increase landfill diversion rate to 70% by 2017.

Current milestone for 2014-15 is 63% landfill diversion.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities
MSU Campus Sustainability
MSU Recycling and Surplus Store


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities is the sole provider for all of campus’s water needs. Drawing groundwater from the Saginaw Aquifer, a deep sandstone formation that lies beneath much of central Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, the university treats the water to distribute to campus. IPF's water plans incorporate conservation, protection, stormwater run off, quality, distribution, and sustainability of water.

Stormwater Management Plan - The Stormwater Committee oversees compliance with MSU’s Michigan MS4 General Watershed Permit. The goal of the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) program is to reduce the discharge of pollutants to surface waters of the state.
Plan can be viewed at:
http://msu-water.msu.edu/managing-stormwater-on-the-msu-campus/
http://msu-water.msu.edu/msu-stormwater-management-program/

Wellhead Protection Plan - To protect our groundwater, which is the sole source of drinking water in the Greater Lansing area, MSU has developed a Wellhead Protection Program.http://www.orcbs.msu.edu/environ/programs_guidelines/wellhead/wh_01toc.htm

In addition to providing water for drinking, washing and irrigation needs, MSU takes stewardship a step further by also producing steam in the T.B. Simon Power Plant to make electricity and to heat and cool the campus infrastructure. To learn more about the water plant process, visit the Process page.

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities partners with other MSU organizations to ensure the safest and smartest water use possible. Visit the Protection page to learn about how MSU works to keep water sources clean. Visit the Conservation page to see how campus seeks to reduce water waste. http://ipf.msu.edu/green/water/conservation.html

Water monitoring is performed regularly. MSU’s water meets or exceeds all State of Michigan and EPA standards. Our most recent water quality report details specific information about the water on campus. http://ipf.msu.edu/green/water/water-quality-report/index.html


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):
Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities
Stormwater Committee http://ipf.msu.edu/green/water/stormwater-committee.html
Power & Water Department
MSU Campus Sustainability
MSU Water - Academic participation www.water.msu.edu
Institute for Public Utilities www.ipu.msu.edu


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

At MSU, we are more than the sum of our parts. Our diverse community challenges us to share our own ideas while considering other points of view. Here, differences are assets. They make us better learners, teachers, scholars, employees, and community members.
MSU’s roots as a land-grant university have created a culture that encourages all people to contribute their special talents and reach their full potential. This inclusive culture extends far beyond the perimeter of campus. In our global research and outreach efforts, we focus our vast capabilities on society’s most pressing challenges and enhance quality of life for individuals and communities worldwide. http://inclusivity.msu.edu

Thorough assessment process of diversity and inclusion initiatives helps the university identify its problems, root causes, possible solutions, timelines and resources needed in the change process. http://www.inclusion.msu.edu/ResearchAndAssessment/index.html

Additionally, MSU takes Affordability seriously. The office of Financial Aid provides many resources to help students plan for their college commitment. The Office of Financial Aid provides access, aid, and advisory services for the MSU Community to facilitate student recruitment, enrollment, and retention at Michigan State University. This is just one piece of the counseling and resources provided. https://finaid.msu.edu/affordability.asp


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

Every year Michigan State University compiles a report to reflect diversity and inclusion as dynamic activities that take place at the university each year. The report is presented annually in the spring to the MSU Board of Trustees and is available to the public online. Several units at the University contribute to the content in the report and the Office for Inclusion is appreciative of their support. The report is designed to demonstrate the vast number of ways that diversity and inclusion are defined and measured. MSU goes well beyond counting and describing people to identify and highlight top quality innovative methods used in teaching, research, student support and stewardship throughout the nation and the
http://www.inclusion.msu.edu/diversityandinclusion/Annual%20Diversity%20Reports.html

Office of Financial Aid measures and assesses student enrollment, retention, academic success, cost of education over lifetime, etc.

Office of the Provost - University Innovation Alliance - a consortium of MSU and ten other major public research institutions, working together to ensure that more low-income and first-generation students are supported in their efforts to earn a college
https://provost.msu.edu/archive/2014/Enhancing-student-success-closing-the-graduation-gap.html


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives
Office of the President
Office of the Provost
Office of Financial Aid - Affordability


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:

In its ongoing quest for excellence, Michigan State University is moving forward with an aggressive plan to create a Healthier Campus. This action report represents an initial effort by an ad hoc task force to sift through the seemingly infinite goals and activities that will move MSU toward this goal and establish a first set of recommended specific actions. The committee acknowledges that this initial prioritization will not create a perfectly Healthy Campus Environment. However, we feel the implementation of these action items will significantly move the needle, a lofty accomplishment in itself.
The Healthy Campus Team began its charge by identifying overarching outcomes to be addressed through implementation of specific activities to move MSU toward becoming a healthier campus for students, faculty and staff. These overarching goals include: (1) Improve health status metrics, (2) Address safety on campus, (3) Create a climate of health engagement/activity, (4) Increase student retention and graduation rates, (5) Incorporate health as a strategic corporate-level goal, (6) Decrease overall healthcare expenditures by MSU, and (7) Address work-life balance.
https://provost.msu.edu/documents/TeamHealthyCampus.pdf

Measuring outcomes of plan: Michigan State University’s Board of Trustees has approved a tobacco-free ordinance, a move that will go into effect Aug. 15, 2016
http://tobaccofree.msu.edu


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

Unknown


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

Office of the Provost


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:

Unknown


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):

Unknown


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Investment plan(s):

Unknown


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:

Unknown


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the other plan(s):

Unknown


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the other plan(s):

Unknown


The institution’s definition of sustainability:

The most common and basic definition of sustainability was established by the 1987 report of the United Nations Commission of Environment and Development, "Our Common Future" which defined "sustainable development" (sustainability) as "development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." Embedded in that definition are two important elements: 1) a long-term view (generations) and 2) a systemic of ecological sense of life. We also accept a definition of sustainability that means "meeting human needs in a socially just manner without depriving ecosystems of their health" (Vucetich & Nelson, 2010). In this way, sustainability also touches our sense of ethic, ethos, and culture and reflects our ideal at the highest level; more than simply efficient planning. Thus, sustainability is about the interdependence of living organisms and communities (both human and nonhuman) over the long haul. Instead of seeing environmental, social, and economic needs as a collection of discrete characteristics or problems, sustainability at MSU looks at them as interdependent and connected. Each has an impact on and consequences for the others.

As an institutional framework for our sustainability vision (definition), a commitment to this definition as it relates to our core missions, goals, and growth as an institution: Michigan State University will foster sustainability by aiming to provide for all of its stakeholders needs in socially just ways both in present and throughout time. We will attend to human well being by better understanding our role within a coupled human-natural system; bolster the ability of complex systems to adapt to changing circumstances for the good of all beings; include and encourage the voices of all stakeholders; and respect the value of preserving choices and a world as rich in resources and possibilities for future decision-makers as we have now. These commitments will be honored through our approach to education, facilities, operations, and interactions with our larger local, regional, and global communities.


Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

“Because higher education institutions are intimately linked to societal growth and transformation, they can help create and instill both the basic and applied knowledge that provides opportunities for all peoples and nations to achieve a heightened state of social and economic well-being and sustainable prosperity.”
Lou Anna K. Simon
President

MSU's strategic plan, Bolder by Design, is the next evolution of it's previous strategic plan, Boldness by Design. In the plan, we continue the core imperatives - Enhance the Student Experience, Increase Research Opportunities, Expand International Reach, Enhance Community, Economic, and Family Life, and Strengthen Stewardship - and adding a sixth imperative, Foster a Culture of High Performance.

Sustainability is addressed in the Strengthen Stewardship imperative, including specific strategies for fulfillment of the Energy Transition plan, establishing a water conservation strategy, setting more aggressive waste reduction goals and campus engagement.


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:

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