Overall Rating Bronze - expired
Overall Score 35.38
Liaison Kristy Howell
Submission Date June 17, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Johnson County Community College
EN-5: Outreach Campaign

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Kim Criner
Student Sustainability Engagement Coordinator
Center for Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Has the institution held at least one sustainability-related outreach campaign directed at students within the previous three years that has yielded measurable, positive results in advancing sustainability?:
Yes

Has the institution held at least one sustainability-related outreach campaign directed at employees within the previous three years that has yielded measurable, positive results in advancing sustainability?:
Yes

The name of the campaign (1st campaign):
Paper Cut

A brief description of the campaign (1st campaign):

Prior to Paper Cut, students on campus and community members accessing the library could print free of charge or limit. Paper Cut was instituted in (?) and imposed relatively lenient printing limits and fees in an effort to cut down on wasteful paper use as well as annual paper costs. Students are allowed 200 free pages each semester (100 in summer semester) in their Paper Cut print quota, after which they pay $.15 a page. Therefore they are encouraged to print wisely and only when necessary. Guests to campus now pay $.15 per page as well.


A brief description of the measured positive impact(s) of the campaign (1st campaign):

Since instituting Paper Cut in 2010-2011 truck loads of paper purchased have decreased from four to three and time between orders has extended from two months to three consistently. Each truck load/order represents approximately $20,000 of paper.


The website URL where information about the campaign is available (1st campaign):
The name of the campaign (2nd campaign):
Single Stream Recycling / Centralized Office Recycling and Trash (CORT)

A brief description of the campaign (2nd campaign):

In summer 2011 the campus switched from separate stream to single stream recycling. The initiative was launched with new blue bins campus wide with large informational stickers about all accepted recyclable materials as well as what *not* to deposit in the bin. An educational video was also produced and aired during Professional Development Days at the start of fall semester that year. During that year, a number of offices volunteered to pilot a second level of the waste reduction initiative, Centralized Office Recycling and Trash (CORT). CORT involved removing individual trash bins from offices and centralizing trash and recycling receptacles within office suites and departments. This proved to increase recycling and waste diversion by putting the consumer in a position to make a more deliberate choice about their disposal and to take responsibility for their waste. The CORT program was taken campus-wide in the summer of 2012.


A brief description of the measured positive impact(s) of the campaign (2nd campaign):

The move to single stream recycling showed a 18% increase in co-mingled recycled material (data taken prior to the start of the program and compared to data after one year in implementation). Subsequently, the campus-wide launch of CORT showed a further 44% increase in co-mingled recycling, due to behavior change within offices (comparing pre-CORT data to one year post implementation). Waste audits within office prior to launching CORT showed that offices were where most of the recycling diversion opportunity existed; prior to CORT a large amount of recyclables were being thrown away. Additionally CORT resulted in a calculated efficiency savings of 4,820 housekeeping hours, due to the fact that housekeeping no longer has to enter each individual office on a nightly basis.


The website URL where information about the campaign is available (2nd campaign):
A brief description of other outreach campaigns, including measured positive impacts:

The e3 Sustainable Office Challenge enlists volunteer offices to increase their efficiency and reduce their waste through conscious decision making and improved everyday office practice. The site below contains the entire checklist, which office representatives are coached through when the register for the program. The representatives serve as ambassadors, educating the rest of the office constituents on new practices to implement as a team. Achievements on the checklist add up toward petals to be displayed on a striking participant plaque. Incentive to earn more panels increases sustainability in offices and promotes behavior change as employees work together to find new ways to earn points toward the challenge.
http://www.jccc.edu/sustainability/projects/e3.html


The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.