Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 57.59
Liaison Maria Ayala
Submission Date Dec. 26, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Universidad San Francisco de Quito
EN-14: Participation in Public Policy

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.67 / 2.00 Melanie Valencia
Sustainability Officer
Innovation and Sustainability Office
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution advocate for public policies that support campus sustainability or that otherwise advance sustainability at the municipal/local level?:
No

A brief description of how the institution engages in public policy advocacy for sustainability at the municipal/local level, including the issues, legislation, and ordinances for or against which the institution has advocated:
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Does the institution advocate for public policies that support campus sustainability or that otherwise advance sustainability at the state/provincial/regional level?:
No

A brief description of how the institution engages in public policy advocacy for sustainability at the state/provincial/regional level, including the issues, legislation, and ordinances for or against which the institution has advocated:
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Does the institution advocate for public policies that support campus sustainability or that otherwise advance sustainability at the national level?:
Yes

A brief description of how the institution engages in public policy advocacy for sustainability at the national level, including the issues, legislation, and ordinances for or against which the institution has advocated:

Evaluation of Ecuadorian Nutritional Label by Wilma Freire in the Public Health School.

In August 2014, the Ecuadorian government, through the Ministry of Public Health, promulgated a Sanitary Regulation for Labeling Processed Foods in Ecuador. This regulation put into effect a stoplight nutritional label, which uses red, yellow, and green to represent high, medium, and low levels of added fat, sugar, and salt, and which was designed in consultation with USFQ’s Institute for Research in Health and Nutrition (ISYN).
A year later, ISYN conducted a qualitative study to evaluate consumer perceptions, understanding, and use of the label. Through focus group discussions, key informant interviews, and structured observations, the evaluation took into account sex, age group and residence in large, intermediate, and small cities in Ecuador’s coast, highlands, and eastern lowland regions.
This evaluation showed that consumers in all age groups, including children, recognize the stoplight label and perceive it to be a source of information about the content of fat, sugar, and salt in processed foods. In particular, the familiar color scheme was recognized as useful in the selection of foods to purchase and consume. Consequently, consumers reported that in some cases, they have reduced the purchase and consumption of unhealthy processed and ultra-processed foods. Key informants included producers processed and ultra-processed foods stated that they do not believe that the label us useful but accept the established policy; additionally in some cases, they have reduced the levels of fat, sugar, or salt in order to have a more “favorable” label. Structured observations showed that the nutritional label regulation is being correctly implemented.
This evaluation resulted in recommendations regarding the location of the label on packages and the need for the label to be obligatory rather than optional. In addition, ISYN recommended that contents not be reported in grams or milliliters but rather in terms of portion size and that a public information strategy be implemented through social networks and groups of students, mothers, and communities about the use of the traffic light label in food purchases and consumption. Finally, ISYN recommended the promotion of locally produced and distributed foods, especially those that are part of Ecuador’s traditional diet.
This evaluation project contributed to the strengthening and continuation of the traffic light label policy.
This process continues in evaluation until the date of submission in 2018.

Participation of Nutrition and Dietetics in the elaboration of the Dietary Guidelines for Ecuador

The Nutrition and Dietetics discipline of the USFQ participated in the Technical Committee for the preparation of the food guides for Ecuador (FAO and Public Health Ministry). 2 faculty members participated in the ongoing workshops though which this policy was developed as members of the technical table in three workshops: the first in June 2017, the second in August 2017 and the third workshop was held in February 2018. Subsequently, two new meetings were held where the USFQ lead the Evidence chapter and supported the content creation of the Annex of Nutritional Goals and Standard Diet.

USFQ proposal for the inclusion of water quality community monitoring programs in national legislation

USFQ proposed to the National Assembly commission of environment to include community environmental monitoring in the draft of the Law of the Special Territorial Area of ​​the Amazon. The proposal stemmed from a research initiative developed by the University during five years, in collaboration with grassroots organizations. This proposal was accepted and incorporated as article 58 of the Law of the Special Territorial Area of ​​the Amazon issued in May 2018.


Does the institution advocate for public policies that support campus sustainability or that otherwise advance sustainability at the international level?:
No

A brief description of how the institution engages in public policy advocacy for sustainability at the international level, including the issues, legislation, and ordinances for or against which the institution has advocated:
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A brief description of other political positions the institution has taken during the previous three years (if applicable):
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A brief description of political donations the institution made during the previous three years (if applicable):
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

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