Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 76.81
Liaison Aaron Durnbaugh
Submission Date March 6, 2020

STARS v2.2

Loyola University Chicago
EN-5: Outreach Campaign

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Aaron Durnbaugh
Director of Sustainability
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Has the institution held a sustainability-related outreach campaign during the previous three years that was directed at students and yielded measurable, positive results in advancing sustainability?:
Yes

Has the institution held a sustainability-related outreach campaign during the previous three years that was directed at employees and yielded measurable, positive results in advancing sustainability?:
Yes

Name of the campaign:
WaterWeek / UnCap LUC

A brief description of the campaign:

"UnCap LUC" is a campaign that led to the banning of the sale of bottled water at Loyola University Chicago. In March of 2012, the students voted in favor of ending the sell of bottled water at Loyola and the phase out process started directly after that. The campaign began with eliminating the selling of bottled water at campus stores, followed by school catering services and finally campus vending machines.

Although the use of plastic is a contributor to environmental problems, the primary goal of UnCap LUC campaign is to raise awareness of the social injustices as well as environmental impacts of water privatization. Water privatization occurs when private businesses develop or are allowed to control public water supplies, and then bottle the water and sell it to the public for a profit. The issue of water privatization focuses on the product in the bottle, not the bottle itself. The students felt strongly that water is a basic human right and the University should not support the privatization of this natural resource.

UnCap LUC has led to the creation of refill stations where individual can refill water bottles, and a map of the stations for Loyola community to access and review. All incoming freshmen and transfer students are given a reusable bottle during orientation,and are made aware of the campaign. Reusable bottles are also sold in campus dining stores.

This campaign continues each year for incoming students as well as the general Loyola community to refresh the university's approach to water rights issues.


A brief description of the measured positive impact(s) of the campaign:

As of February 2019, Loyola had 102 refill stations on its Lakeshore Campus & Water Tower Campuses. They had reduced the usage of 8,259,389 plastic water bottles. They each have a sign that communicates the source of the water (Lake Michigan) and that our municipal water is "free, safe, and local".

Notes: this number was taken from the tracker on each refill station. This number represents anytime the refill station was used to fill a bottle. This is highly conservative because 27 bottle fillers have no tracking function.


Name of the campaign (2nd campaign):
PlasticFree LUC

A brief description of the campaign (2nd campaign):

This campaign was the initiative of two students during the spring of 2019. They conducted research and outreach on the impacts of plastics and met with LoyolaDining to encourage the reduction of single-use plastics on campus.

https://www.luc.edu/sustainability/campus/recycling/wasteweek/plasticfreeluc/


A brief description of the measured positive impact(s) of the campaign (2nd campaign):

The impact of this campaign was the elimination of single-use plastics from the dining halls. LoyolaDining estimates that this removed 3,000 lbs of plastic straws and cutlery each month. The only remaining item available in the dining hall is the cup used to fill the waffle maker and compostable straws are available upon request only.


A brief description of other sustainability-related outreach campaigns:

Other campaigns have addressed pressure to develop a climate action plan (Loyola2020), Sustainable Investment Policy (SIP), Green Graduation Pledge.


Additional documentation to support the submission:
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