Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Nicole Arsenault
Submission Date April 20, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

York University
OP-22: Waste Minimization

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Andrew Plunkett
Sustainability Coordinator
President
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Waste generated::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Materials recycled 1519.53 Tonnes 1196.58 Tonnes
Materials composted 254.01 Tonnes 268.53 Tonnes
Materials reused, donated or re-sold 1308.16 Tonnes 216.82 Tonnes
Materials disposed in a solid waste landfill or incinerator 1643.82 Tonnes 1811.65 Tonnes

Figures needed to determine "Weighted Campus Users”::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Number of residential students 1950 2132
Number of residential employees 8 8
Number of in-patient hospital beds 0 0
Full-time equivalent enrollment 53974 50691
Full-time equivalent of employees 9838 8683
Full-time equivalent of distance education students 1100
+ Date Revised: June 28, 2016
1000
+ Date Revised: June 28, 2016

Start and end dates of the performance year and baseline year (or three-year periods):
Start Date End Date
Performance Year Jan. 1, 2013 Dec. 31, 2013
Baseline Year Jan. 1, 2007 Dec. 31, 2007

A brief description of when and why the waste generation baseline was adopted:

The first full fiscal year of waste statistics collected was for the 2006-07 period, to track waste diversion and to indicate areas for improvement. York University was also responding to increasing regulatory requirements regarding waste management tracking.


A brief description of any (non-food) waste audits employed by the institution:

At least once annually, the University conducts a 24-hour sample waste audit of representative buildings (i.e academic, administrative, residential, vending, interior and exterior). The findings from this audit are used to develop the annual waste reduction plan.


A brief description of any institutional procurement policies designed to prevent waste:

York University phased out the sale of bottled water in September of 2015, which has included a provision that University funds not be used to purchase bottled water. The University and has also installed 75 water refill stations on campus. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to bring reusable water bottles with them.


A brief description of any surplus department or formal office supplies exchange program that facilitates reuse of materials:

University surplus furniture is allocated to other departments to decrease waste and maximize the life cycle of University assets prior to considering disposal, which is undertaken in accordance with the University policy on the disposal of surplus assets. Through arrangements with Procurement Services, unwanted items may also be donated to non-profit organizations for re-use.


A brief description of the institution's efforts to make materials available online by default rather than printing them:

Procurement services have taken up a couple of initiative to reduce their paper consumption. Sm@rtBuy is York’s new on-line procurement system that will streamline purchasing at York, allowing for significant time savings for everyone currently involved in purchasing routine items. A paperless, web-based bid tool has been implemented, which will allow York’s proposal evaluators to evaluate and score proposals electronically. 40,000 sheets of paper will be saved annually.


A brief description of any limits on paper and ink consumption employed by the institution:

All undergraduate students must pay a fee per page for printing in all school computer labs or libraries.


A brief description of any programs employed by the institution to reduce residence hall move-in/move-out waste:

York sets up "FreeStuff" tables for residence move-in/ move-out. As well, the ReYUse program also provides another option for reducing residence move-out waste. ReYUse is an online application for sharing unwanted personal items exclusively among the York University community. Students can post their unwanted items on ReYUse year-round.


A brief description of any other (non-food) waste minimization strategies employed by the institution:
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A brief description of any food waste audits employed by the institution:

At least once annually, the University conducts a 24-hour sample waste audit of representative buildings (i.e academic, administrative, residential, vending, interior and exterior). Every year, at least one food preparation/vending operation is included in the audit. The findings from this audit are used to develop the annual waste reduction plan.


A brief description of any programs and/or practices to track and reduce pre-consumer food waste in the form of kitchen food waste, prep waste and spoilage:

All food vendors at York University are required to divert all pre-consumer food waste for composting. The Waste Management Supervisor meets annually (or more often if required) with property managers to provide refresher training on all aspects of the waste management program, particularly organics capture. York's private sector food provider (Aramark) has a corporate food waste management program aimed at reducing the amount of organic waste generated. Since its implementation in 2012-2013, there has been a noted decrease in the amount of organic waste generated by its food preparation areas.


A brief description of programs and/or practices to track and reduce post-consumer food waste:

Small organic waste bins are deployed throughout the University in kitchenettes, serveries and other areas where the community prepares and eats food.


A brief description of the institution's provision of reusable and/or third party certified compostable to-go containers for to-go food and beverage items (in conjunction with a composting program):

Food vendor Aramark offers certified compostable disposal containers, as do some other campus vendors.


A brief description of the institution's provision of reusable service ware for “dine in” meals and reusable and/or third party certified compostable service ware for to-go meals (in conjunction with a composting program):

The Eco-Takeout program is available at various locations around campus. It provides students with the option to take their food to go in a reusable container. Using these containers is a more sustainable way to buy takeout and will help significantly reduce packaging waste. There are 4 different containers available to suit any type of food – soup, stir-fry, entrees and side dishes, sandwiches, etc. When finished with the containers they can be returned to any of the Eco-Takeout program locations where they will be washed and sterilized.
Several vendors throughout the University offer reusable dishes for use dining at or near the vendor location. Many new vending locations (i.e. Bistros in Osgoode and Bergeron Buildings) are prioritizing reusable dishes.


A brief description of any discounts offered to customers who use reusable containers (e.g. mugs) instead of disposable or compostable containers in to-go food service operations:

The Lug-a-Mug Program at York aims to reduce waste by providing discounts to those who use their own containers to purchase beverages. Reusable mugs are accepted at all campus food vendors, and the following vendors offer a discount ranging from $.10 to $.25!
• Café Suprême
• Central Square Cafeteria
• Complex 1 Cafeteria
• Complex 2 Cafeteria
• Country Style Kosher Deli
• Glendon Cafeteria
• Grad Lounge and Reading Room
• Las Nubes Coffee
• TEL Cafeteria
• Tim Hortons (all campus locations)
• Timothy’s Market Cafe
• Second Cup


A brief description of other dining services waste minimization programs and initiatives:

York University phased out the sale of bottled water as of September 2015, which will reduce the amount of bottles that end up in the waste and recycling streams.


The website URL where information about the institution’s waste minimization initiatives is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.