Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 65.01
Liaison Paul Mathisen
Submission Date May 23, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Worcester Polytechnic Institute
OP-9: Landscape Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.50 / 2.00 Liz Tomaszewski
Facilities Systems Manager/Sustainability Coordinator
Facilities Department
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Total campus area (i.e. the total amount of land within the institutional boundary):
93 Acres

Figures required to calculate the total area of managed grounds:
Area (double-counting is not allowed)
Area managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program that uses a four-tiered approach 35 Acres
Area managed in accordance with an organic land care standard or sustainable landscape management program that has eliminated the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides in favor of ecologically preferable materials 0 Acres
Area managed using conventional landscape management practices (which may include some IPM principles or techniques) 35 Acres
Total area of managed grounds 70 Acres

A brief description of any land excluded from the area of managed grounds (e.g. the footprint of buildings and impervious surfaces, experimental agricultural land, areas that are not regularly managed or maintained):

the footprint of buildings and impervious surfaces


Percentage of grounds managed in accordance with an IPM program:
50

A copy of the IPM plan or program:
---

A brief description of the IPM program:

Bartlett Tree Experts is the contractor that takes care of pest management at WPI. They use a integrated approach to managing insects and diseases on commercial properties that begins with maintaining plant health using sound cultural practices, including pruning and creating optimal soil conditions for plant growth. Periodic inspections are used to detect pest infestations before they each damaging levels. Bartlett arborists are trained to recognize beneficial insects that will help naturally suppress pest populations, and we also release beneficial to augment existing populations. When treatments are necessary, Bartlett uses organic and natural-based materials and reduced-risk products that provide effective pest suppression while protecting people and the environment.


Percentage of grounds managed in accordance with an organic program:
0

A brief description of the organic land standard or landscape management program that has eliminated the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides in favor of ecologically preferable materials:

na


A brief description of the institution's approach to plant stewardship:

The campus has an increasingly expanding selection of local perennial flowers that bloom throughout the season. These are augmented with specific local annual plantings both in the spring and fall to highlight specific areas. Care cycle for maintenance is every week to 10 days. Health and vigor dictate cycle of fertilization and disease control in beds that are essentially kept weed-free.


A brief description of the institution's approach to hydrology and water use:

WPI installed an environmentally sound and academically-interesting green roof on East Hall. The 5,000-square-foot plant-covered section of East Hall's roof improves the building's environment footprint in several ways, including handling and filtering storm water. The roof plantings include a combination of low-maintenance, drought-resistant specimens such as sedums, chives, hen, and chickens (a species of succulent plant) and ice plants, also know as Delospema. Most of the plants were selected not only for their ability to hold water, but also for their color and to provide a new habitat for birds, butterflies, and other species. In addition, a bioswale was created in the Higgins House parking low, providing natural sediment and contamination filtration from the parking lot run-off.


A brief description of the institution's approach to materials management and waste minimization (e.g. composting and/or mulching on-site waste):

A small portion of landscape waste is left on site. The bulk of the landscape waste is transported to Worcester Sand and Gravel where the waste is screened and then sold as compost.


A brief description of the institution's approach to energy-efficient landscape design:

A green roof was installed on the East Hall residence. The 5,000-square-foot plant-covered section of East Hall's roof improves the building's environment footprint in several ways, including handling and filtering storm water. The roof plantings include a combination of low-maintenance, drought-resistant specimens such as sedums, chives, hen, and chickens (a species of succulent plant) and ice plants, also know as Delospema. Most of the plants were selected not only for their ability to hold water, but also for their color and to provide a new habitat for birds, butterflies, and other species. In addition, a bioswale was created in the Higgins House parking lot, providing natural sediment and contamination filtration from the parking lot run-off. In addition, Lighting in the stone paver entrances is powered by solar energy and leaves no carbon footprint. It is designed to last longer than ordinary solar lights by using LED technology, extending the life of the lights 5 times over.


A brief description of other sustainable landscape management practices employed by the institution (e.g. use of environmentally preferable landscaping materials, initiatives to reduce the impacts of ice and snow removal, wildfire prevention):

Grass is normally cut once every 5-10 working days. During this recent period of drought in Worcester, we modified our frequency to allow for more grass growth between cutting to preserve grass growth. Watering was prohbited within city limits. Normally aeration is not undertaken unless a specific lawn repair project is undertaken. Reseeding or resodding is generally done in the spring to repair bare spots resulting from winter damage. Weed control is practiced when weeds present a visible problem or when they affect approximately 10% of a lawn area. The campus has a growing selection of local perennial flowers that bloom throughout the season. These are augmented with local annual plantings in the spring and fall to highlight specific areas of campus. The care cycle for maintenance is every week to 10 days. Health and vigor dictate the cycle of fertilization and disease control in beds that are essentially kept weed-free. There are two bioswales that minimize runoff contaminants.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

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