Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 60.52
Liaison Seth Vidana
Submission Date March 1, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Western Washington University
PA-7: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.39 / 4.00 Renee Collins
Director
Student Outreach Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

WWU has a number of programs that minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students. Specifics on these programs are listed in the credit fields below and more information can be found on this web page:

http://www.finaid.wwu.edu/scholarships/pages/wwu_scholarships.php


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

The Dean of Students unit provides cultural competency training opportunities for staff within the unit to better serve a broad array of students from diverse backgrounds. The Dean of Students unit encompasses Viking Union Facilities, Student Activities, Outdoor Recreation, Student Outreach Services, and the Office of Student Life.

The Counseling Center provides Professional Development and Training in order to keep current on issues facing different communities of students, the professional and intern staff attend trainings to examine issues of race, culture, sexual orientation, gender and gender transitioning, religion, and spirituality as well as staying apprised of needs of particular student populations.


A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

SummerStart and Transitions program: The Student Outreach Services department participates in the summer start and transitions programs that includes incoming first-year and transfer students and their families. This is an orientation, advising and class registration program.
http://www.nssfo.wwu.edu/summerstart/index.shtml

Student Outreach Services serves first-generation, multicultural and non-traditional students and engages students in personalized academic coaching, peer mentoring and specialized programs using a global and multicultural focus to support student persistence and academic achievement. An early move-in program is also designed for first-generation/low-income students to assist in their transition to WWU.
http://www.wwu.edu/depts/sos/

The Ethnic Student Center (ESC): The ESC is a community that supports historically underrepresented ethnic students and allies by providing a social atmosphere and inclusive environment where we engage in identity exploration and strive for cultural awareness and academic excellence.
http://as.wwu.edu/esc/

Jump Start Program
The goal of this program is to help insure the retention of up to 250 new students from low-income and/or first-generation families. Students will be assigned an advisor to work with them on academic, personal and social issues. In addition peer mentors will be assigned to each student in the likelihood of their integration into the campus community.
Target Population: First-generation and/or Low-income new students
Number: Up to 250 students, 60-70 Parents
Partners: Admissions, Financial Aid, University Residences, Tutoring Center, Ethnic Student Center

Strategies for Success (SFS) Program -
The goal of this program is to help insure the retention of 250 new students from low-income and/or first-generation families. Students will be assigned an advisor to work with them on academic, personal and social issues. In addition peer mentors will be assigned to each student in the likelihood of their integration into the campus community.
Target Population: First-generation and/or Low-income new students
Number: 250 students
Partners: Admissions, Financial Aid, University Residences, Tutoring Center, Ethnic Student Center

College Success Foundation (CSF): Washington Achievers/Governors Scholars/Leadership 1000 Scholars Programs
The goals of the CSF programs are to increase the retention and graduation of low-income, first generation and foster youth college students identified and supported by the College Success Foundation. SOS acts as a liaison between the student, the College Success Foundation and various campus offices including Financial Aid.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

The WWU Scholarship Center is available to assist students and their families as they search and apply for scholarships. The awarding of a scholarship represents not only a significant source of financial assistance, but recognition of special achievements and an investment in a student’s potential.

Western Washington University categorizes its scholarships into three sections which serve the following: Incoming Freshman and Transfer, Undergraduate, and Graduate Students.

WWU Scholarships for Incoming Freshmen and Transfer Students:
Merit Scholarships - Merit based scholarships are most often determined by very high qualifiers including high GPA, high test-scores, extra curricular or community activities, and excellent letters of recommendation.

Diversity Scholarships - Western Washington University has included in its design for excellence the need to diversify its student body, faculty, and staff. Western offers scholarships to this diverse group of students who demonstrate strong academic promise, talent and community service activity.

WSAC - Washington Student Achievement Council. The state of Washington funds a variety of financial aid programs to help students and their families pay for college.

High School Scholarships

Other Scholarships

Undergraduate Student Scholarships:
We offer over 600 scholarships to Undergraduate students annually. There are three sections of scholarships: Departmental, Non-Departmental and Diversity scholarships. In addition, each department awards one or two partial tuition waivers. Recipients of tuition waivers must be full-time undergraduate students enrolled on Western's main campus.

Non-Departmental Scholarships - The university offers a number of scholarship programs that are not restricted to a specific major or department.

Diversity Scholarships - Western Washington University offers scholarships to a diverse group of students who demonstrate strong academic promise, talent and community service activity.

Departmental Scholarships - The university's colleges and departments offer scholarships to outstanding students majoring in specific programs of study.

WWU Graduate Student Scholarships:
Western Washington University offers over 300 scholarships to Graduate students annually. There are three sections of scholarships: Departmental, Non-Departmental, and Diversity scholarships. For the Departmental scholarships, click on the department for a listing of the corresponding scholarships.

Non-Departmental Scholarships - The university offers a number of scholarship programs that are not restricted to a specific major or department.

Departmental Scholarships - The university's colleges and departments offer scholarships to outstanding students majoring in specific programs of study.

Detailed Info:

http://www.finaid.wwu.edu/scholarships/pages/wwu_scholarships.php


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

Compass 2 Campus
The Western Washington University Compass 2 Campus Mentorship Initiative is a pilot program implemented by House Bill 1986 which passed both Houses of the legislature on April 21, 2009. The program is designed to increase access to higher education by providing an opportunity for students from traditionally underrepresented, low income, diverse backgrounds in Whatcom and Skagit counties to be mentored by C2C students.

In addition, Student Outreach Services office receives a list of admitted students who are indicated to come from low income families. SOS reaches out by sending mail and calling, offering advising, counseling and support to those students.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:
---

Does the institution have policies and programs to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

We do not provide scholarships specifically for part-time students. Most of our scholarships are directed to full-time students.


A brief description of the institution’s on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

The WWU Associated Students Child Development Center (CDC) participates in the State's Early Achiever's Quality Rating and Improvement program. We provide high quality care and education for children of student parents and working professionals of Western Washington University. Tuition for student parents is based on income and is subsidized by the Associated Students. The CDC serves 56 children ages 2-5 each quarter. The program manager and teaching staff provide a safe and healthy environment for young children, supporting the social/emotional, physical, and intellectual growth of each child.
The CDC also supports students interested in careers in early childhood education by providing a place for service learning projects, classroom observations, practicum and internship experiences as well as educational outreach activities. Parents benefit from special events for the entire family and participation in a parent advisory board. The CDC is not only child centered, but family centered, meeting the special needs of student parents and welcoming parent involvement in the center.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:
---

Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (tracking accessibility and affordability)? (If data is not available, select 'No'):
Yes

The percentage of entering students that are low-income (0-100):
26

The graduation/success rate for low-income students (0-100):
82

On average, the percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid (e.g. as reported to the U.S. Common Data Set initiative, item H2) (0-100):
87.30

The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required (i.e. the percentage of graduates who have not taken out interest-bearing loans) (0-100):
44

Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students (0-100):
---

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.