Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Jennifer Bodine
Submission Date April 23, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Weber State University
AC-1: Academic Courses

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Emily Mead
Sustainability Coordinator
Facilities Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Figures required to calculate the percentage of courses with sustainability content::
Undergraduate Graduate
Total number of courses offered by the institution 22538 465
Number of sustainability courses offered 148 6
Number of courses offered that include sustainability 388 13

Number of academic departments (or the equivalent) that offer at least one sustainability course and/or course that includes sustainability (at any level):
27

Total number of academic departments (or the equivalent) that offer courses (at any level):
47

Number of years covered by the data:
Two

A copy of the institution’s inventory of its course offerings with sustainability content (and course descriptions):
An inventory of the institution's course offerings with sustainability content (and course descriptions):

ATTC 3760 - Advanced Automotive Technologies

A study of current events/trends in the automotive industry, industry standard professional publications, and the latest technologies used by the automotive industry to meet current emissions, fuel economy, and safety regulations. Prerequisite/

ATTC 4760 - Alternate Fuel Systems

A study of alternate fuel systems including bio fuels (ethanol and bio-diesel systems), advanced diesel systems, hybrid-electric vehicles, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) systems, hydrogen fuel cell, and other existing or emerging technologies.

ATTC 4860 - Automotive Standards, Laws, and Regulations

A study of automotive industry related Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) standards, State Regulations, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emissions regulations, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS),
Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations and others.

BSAD 3330 - Business Ethics and Environmental Responsibility

An introduction to the rudiments of moral reasoning, concepts and principles, and their application to common ethical issues faced in business. Special attention will be given to moral issues associated with the use of the natural environment by businesses.

BTNY 1403 - Environment Appreciation

Development of awareness of the consequences of the impact of modern science through technology upon our environments and how we respond to issues related to threats to our biological life-support system. A definition of a quality environment is developed, with student input, and an analysis of the existing quality of our environment is made in light of this definition which challenges our collective wisdom to identify those things which we do well and to prescribe remedies for shortcomings. This course can be taken for 3 or 4 credits with the fourth credit based on a major research paper or project on an environmental issue.

BTNY 2303 – Ethnobotany

A global study of how plants are used by indigenous peoples for food, fiber, fabric, shelter, medicine, weapons, and tools. Plants that are well known to science as well as those with purported uses by villagers, shamans, curanderos and medicine men/women will be studied. Students will learn fundamental botanical principles, how to conduct field work and how to collect plants and prepare them for use. Ethical questions concerning conservation, biodiversity and the continued loss of indigenous plants and cultures will also be discussed. Three lecture/demonstrations per week.

BTNY 2413 - Introduction to Natural Resource Management

Introduces students, especially those interested in forestry and range management, to concepts and ideologies in the utilization and preservation of forests, range, soils, wildlife, water and fisheries, and the human impact on these resources. Three hours of lecture per week.

BTNY 3403 - Environment Appreciation

Development of awareness of the consequences of the impact of modern science through technology upon our environments and how we respond to issues related to threats of our biological life-support system. A definition of a quality environment is developed, with student input, and an analysis of the existing quality of our environment is made in light of this definition which challenges our collective wisdom to identify those things which we do well and to prescribe remedies for shortcomings. Three hours of lecture per week. An in-depth research paper on an environmental issue and an in-class lecture are required.

CMT 3630 - Environmental Issues in FM

Practical application of environmental practices and procedures pertinent to preservation, protection, compliance and conservation issues related to facilities management with emphasis on the regulatory and permitting process, environmental planning, auditing and assessment, recycling, indoor air quality (IAQ) and ozone level depleting substances (OLDS), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs and permitting procedures, Occupational Health and Safety Act (OSHA) programs, and sustainable practices.

CMT 3660 - Energy Management

The course addresses the methodologies of estimating annual energy consumption, undertaking energy audits, and monitoring and targeting energy consumption of fossil fuels. The material covered is for building services engineering, building engineering, and environmental engineering in facilities management.

DANC 4890 - Cooperative Work Experience (Green Map)

Individual work or work in small groups by arrangement; in special topics not included in the announced course offerings. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. In individual cases, this course might be considered as an elective in the Dance Major.

ECON 1100 - Environmental Issues and Economic Policy

An analysis of policies which affect environmental resources. Emphasis on economic analysis of renewable and nonrenewable resources, pollution, and public policy. This course demonstrates economic solutions to environmental problems, and the role economics plays in designing environmental policy.

ENGL 1010 - Introductory College Writing

Students will learn practices of successful academic writing. Students will focus on the writing process, writing for specific audiences, collaboration with peers, and on the interrelationship between reading and writing.

ENGL 2010 - Intermediate College Writing

This course will focus on writing arguments, conducting research, and documenting sources. Students will continue to learn practices of successful academic writing including the writing process, writing for specific audiences, and collaboration with peers.

ENGL 3520 - Literature of the Natural World

This course engages literary texts that focus on humans in relation to their natural environment. Conceived as a survey course, it attempts to delineate the various traditions of environmental concern, from the ancient past to the present, and to draw attention to the ongoing relevance of such texts. Students will learn how to read closely and carefully, and how to make such literature meaningful for their own daily lives.

HIST 3270 – American Environmental History

The new scholarship in American environmental history, considering the intellectual and material interaction people have had with the environment of North America, from pre-contact to the present.

IDT 2010 - Sustainability I: Textiles and Soft Materials

A study of fibers, yarns, fabric structure, codes, finishes, and sustainable manufacturing practices and products-as they relate to residential and commercial interiors. Three-dimensional projects may be required as part of this course.

IDT 3030 - Sustainability II: Materials, Hard Surfaces, and Specifications

Exploration and research of interior finishes, materials, and sustainable practices. Practical application for specifying and installation of materials will be emphasized. Three-dimensional projects may be required as part of this course. An interdisciplinary design charrette is featured as part of this course.

GEO 1060 - Environmental Geosciences

The scientific study of the interaction of humans and earth systems including topics of natural hazards; soil, water, energy and mineral resources; and issues of global change. Three lectures per week.
GEO 1065 - Environmental Geosciences Lab

Laboratory and field exercises involving analysis of geologic data related to environmental issues or problems. Application of the scientific method and development of basic computational and map interpretation skills will be stressed.

GEO 3080 - Water Resources

A detailed examination of the water cycle, including, precipitation, surface water, groundwater, glaciers, water conservation, water management, and water pollution with special emphasis on the water resources of Utah and neighboring areas.

GEOG 3060 – Global Environmental Issues

A study of global and local environmental issues such as changing air and water quality, food production, waste management, and other topics. The course identifies strategies for creating healthier and more sustainable ways of living within our natural and built environments.

GEOG 4410 - Land Use Planning Techniques and Practices

A study of the status and tools of planning, planning office organization, the federal and state role in planning, and problems in planning. The course emphasizes concepts of sustainable land use planning such as resource conservation, air and water quality improvement, agricultural land preservation, transit oriented development, and alternatives to suburban sprawl.

GEOG 4420 - Advanced Planning Techniques

A study of the enabling legislation for planning, zoning laws and ordinances, rezoning and review processes, zoning problems, and the ramifications of urban growth. The preparation, financing, citizen participation and evaluation of land use pertaining to general plans. Class groups will prepare, critique, and present a draft urban general plan.

*MBA 6110 - Tools for the Ethical Manager

This course is designed to be taken at the beginning of formal course work in the MBA program. Students will explore various aspects of moral reasoning and apply these concepts to common ethical issues faced in business. Students will work individually and in groups to explore issues of personal values, self-awareness, teamwork, communication, managing differences, and career management. Students in this course will be introduced to analytical, communication, and technological tools used throughout the program.

*MBA 6710 - Accounting and Finance for Environmental Sustainability

This course will expose MBA students to contemporary accounting and finance thought on environmental sustainability. The course will be divided into accounting and finance modules. The focus of the accounting module will include measurement and reporting of the environmental sustainability of business practices. The focus of the finance module will include capital budgeting for sustainability, financial assessment of sustainable business practices, and investing in environmental sustainability.

*MBA 6720 - Environmental Economics for Sustainable Business

Environmental economics considers the efficient and equitable use of society’s scarce environmental resources. Environmental resources include air, water, land, wildlife, biodiversity, and ecological systems. The allocation of environmental resources will be considered from different perspectives: (1) market allocations; (2) efficient allocations; (3) equitable allocations; and (4) government attempts to allocate these resources efficiently. Topics of the course include property rights, market failures, benefit-cost analysis, welfare economics, non-market valuation, environmental regulation, and sustainable development and business practices. Emphasis will be placed on the impacts on the firm resulting from environmental problems and regulations; and on sustainable business practices.

*MBA 6730 - Consulting Project in Environmental Sustainability

Graduate students are given the opportunity to consult with an existing organization, evaluate sustainable business practices, make recommendations for improvements, and assist in implementing changes in the organization. Students meet periodically with supervising faculty to review results.

MICR 3502 - Environmental Health

Air and water quality, solid and hazardous waste management, food protection, environmental inspection and testing.

MICR 3484 - Environmental Microbiology

Applied, environmental microbiology and biotechnology including transport of microorganisms through environment, microbial pathogens and toxins in environment. Biodeterioration, contamination control, and biosafety. Pollution microbiology, environmental management, bioremediation, waste treatment, biological insecticides. Microbiology of man-made environments.

SOC 3300 - Environment and Society

An in-depth study of societal-environmental interactions including population, technology and organization impacts of human societies on the physical environment, and environmental impacts on human behavior and social organization.

ZOOL 3500 - Conservation Biology

The study of how biological principles and concepts are used in conservation. Major emphasis on the preservation and management of biodiversity. Connections between biological and societal issues are explored.

ATTC 3020 - Introduction to Safety Management and Hazardous Materials

An overview of the environmental issues related to the use and service of vehicles, with emphasis on air quality topics. Environmental regulations, safe practices, disposal of hazardous substances, such as paints and solvents. Prerequisite: ATTC 3000.

ATTC 3620 - Automotive Business Practices

Study of independent shop and corporate dealership standards, fixed operations, inventory and personnel management, and industry report systems, financial policies and procedures. Includes financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: ATTC 3000.

ANTH 3900 - Magic, Shamanism and Religion

A comparative study of the origins, development, and social functions of magic, shamanism, and religion within cultural systems around the world.

ATTC 4860 - Automotive Standards, Laws, and Regulations

A study of automotive industry related Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) standards, State Regulations, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emissions regulations, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS), Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations, and others. Prerequisite: ATTC 3000.

AUSV 1000 - Introduction to Automotive Service

An introduction to automotive shop safety, pollution prevention, hazardous waste handling, Internet-based electronic service information, diagnostic scan tools, ASE certifications, safety inspection certifications, emissions inspection certifications, developing job interview skills, and resume writing. (This course is a prerequisite for all automotive service courses.)

AUSV 1001 - Collision Repair Fundamentals and Estimating

This course is and introduction to the collision repair industry and the construction of the modern automobile as it applies to the collision repair industry. Emphasis will be placed on locating vehicle information, basic construction of vehicles, environmental concerns and issues, and writing collision repair estimates on damaged vehicles.

BTNY 1303 - Plants in Human Affairs

This class provides a general introduction to the importance and function of plants in human affairs. It includes an overview of science as a way of knowing, plant forms and functions, plant reproduction, and use of economically and sociologically important plants. Flowering and non-flowering plants and products such as fruits, forages, grains, medicines, herbs and spices, textile fibers, lumber, algae, and foliage plants are studied. Ecological concepts as they relate to the growth and production of world food crops will also be included. The course has a strong emphasis on the historical development of exploitation of certain plants and the role plants played in exploration and international development. This class cannot be used to fulfull requirements for a Botany major or minor. Three hours of lecture per week.

BTNY 2104 - Plant Form and Function

A study of the structure, function, and reproduction of seed plants. The role of plants in making life on earth possible is an important theme. This course is designed for science majors and is a prerequisite for selected upper division Botany courses. Two hours of lecture and two 2-hour labs per week. Botany majors are advised to take BTNY 2121prior to or concurrently with this course.

BTNY 2114 - Evolutionary Survey of Plants

A study of the diversity, ecology, and reproduction of plants in the context of the evolution of life on earth. The role of plants in making life on earth possible is an important theme. This course is designed for science majors and is a prerequisite for selected upper division Botany courses. Two hours of lecture and two 2-hour labs per week. Botany majors are advised to take BTNY 2121 prior to or concurrently with this course.

BTNY 3643 - Intermountain Flora

A taxonomic study of plants that are of major importance to the management of wildland resources. Students will learn to identify 300 of the most important grasses, woody plants, and marsh-aquatic plants. Considers federal laws for the regulation of rare and endangered species and habitat designation. One hour of lecture and two 2-hour labs per week.

BTNY 3523 - Marine Biology

A study of marine biology and ecology, relating to the plant and animal populations of the sea to their various habitats, including the pelagic environment, the sea bottom, sea shores, and estuaries.
CHEM 4550 – Geochemistry

The chemistry of the earth and geochemical processes operating in the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere with a synthesis of these ideas to account for the chemical evolution of the earth. Applications to mineral stability and chemical reactions, geochemical cycles, and isotope geochemistry.

CHF 2100 - Family Resource Management

Understanding the significance of values, goals, attitudes and planning strategies in the management of human, economic and environmental resources as they relate to increasing satisfaction and the enhancement of family relationships.
CMT 1210 - Commercial Construction Materials and Methods

This course provides students with knowledge of residential building techniques and materials. The course will examine common construction materials, components, and systems as related to wood frame structures, including sustainable materials. The residential construction process will be analyzed from site planning to finish construction.

CMT 3260 - Mechanical and Electrical Systems

This course provides basic knowledge of electrical, plumbing, and HVAC systems used in residential and light commercial buildings. Emphasis is placed on advantages and disadvantages of various systems, and how their design and installation integrates into the management of the building process.

DANC 4890 - Cooperative Work Experience (Green Map)

Individual work or work in small groups by arrangement; in special topics not included in the announced course offerings. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. In individual cases, this course might be considered as an elective in the Dance Major.

DET 1350 - Residential Architectural Design

The study of residential and light commercial (Type IV and V buildings) architectural design and construction documents. Covers procedures used in developing residential plans using 2D CAD. Includes architectural design and drafting standards, conventions, procedures and current building code requirements of the International Residential Code (IRC) and International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).

ENGL 3520 - Literature of the Natural World

This course engages literary texts that focus on humans in relation to their natural environment. Conceived as a survey course, it attempts to delineate the various traditions of environmental concern, from the ancient past to the present, and to draw attention to the ongoing relevance of such texts. Students will learn how to read closely and carefully, and how to make such literature meaningful for their own daily lives.

GEO 1130 - Introduction to Meteorology

Survey of atmospheric processes that create weather. Topics include solar radiation, temperature, moisture, pressure, wind, storm systems, weather forecasting, and air pollution. Problem solving skills and use of satellite imagery included.

GEO 3010 - Oceanography and Earth Systems

Study of the world’s oceans as a framework for examining the major issues in Earth system science. Topics include plate tectonics and the origin of ocean basins, atmosphere-ocean linkages and feedbacks, El Nino events, the ocean’s role in biogeochemical cycles, structure and organization of marine ecosystems, and the scientific basis for understanding human impacts on marine systems.

GEOG 1000 - Natural Environments of the Earth

A study of the interrelated systems that constitute the earth’s surface environment, e.g., landforms, weather, climate, natural vegetation, hydrology, and soils, and their integrated patterns of world distribution.

GEOG 1001 - Natural Environments Field Studies

This introductory level field studies course investigates natural environmental phenomena including weather, climate, natural vegetation, landforms, hydrology, soils and human impacts on the environment. While exploring local natural environments from a geographic perspective, understanding of principles of physical geography is enhanced through direct observation in the field and through the measurement of phenomena noted above.

GEOG 1300 - People and Places of the World

The study of different places, countries, and regions of the world. Addresses topics relating to natural environment, ethnic diversity, and regional differences in subjects related to culture, gender, age, class, social structure, spatial organization, and economic activities. Current social conditions within the world’s major culture realms are analyzed and compared.

GEOG 3050 - Weather and Climate

The advanced study of the processes that produce global climate patterns; analysis of the prospects and possible repercussions of global climate change; and an examination of climatic anomalies such as El Niño, hurricanes, tornadoes and other unusual phenomena.

GEOG 3080 - Arid Lands

Presents a general overview of the characteristics and variant topography, geography, and climatic conditions of the Earth’s arid lands. Examines the spatial location of arid regions and their climatic controlling factors. Weather patterns, hydrology, and eolian processes will be discussed along with sediment transportation and deposition of arid environments. The course will also review dune types and formation along with soils of arid zones. The course concludes with a discussion on the desertification and the impact of human intervention in the misuse of arid lands, while discussing preservation versus reclamation of these regions.

GEOG 3090 - Arctic and Alpine Environments

An examination of the physical environments of high altitude and high latitude places, the ways in which humans interact with these environments, and their broader roles within the large Earth systems. Topics will include causes and consequences of avalanches, climatic characteristics of the
Arctic, glacier behavior, sea ice, and the responses of human physiology to high altitudes.

GEOG 3360 - Economic Geography

The spatial structure of the world’s resources, production, commerce, and economic problems.

GEOG 3460 - Advanced Cartography

The advanced study of maps and their role in portraying geographic data. Emphasis will be placed on various digital (computer and computer-aided) mapping techniques that categorize geographic data and illustrate this information in map form. The course will also examine cartographic visualization, databases, and production.

GEOG 3740 - Geography of Africa

The study of Africa’s natural environment, ethnic diversity, and regional differences in culture, gender, age, class, societal structure, wealth, spatial organization, and economic activities. Current socio-economic conditions in Africa are analyzed within the context of its colonial inheritance and its future outlook.

GEOG 4950 - Advanced Regional Field Studies

A directed study of specific geographic regions utilizing field observations, lectures, and individual student research.

HIST 4120 - The American West Since 1900

Explores the history of the Trans-Mississippi West Region during the twentieth century, to include analysis of such issues as water use and allocation, population growth, land use, exploitation of resources, conservation, the federal presence, tourism, and threats to the environment.

HLTH 1030 - Healthy Lifestyles

A systematic approach to promote health enhancing behaviors related to the prevention of disease and achievement of optimal health. Focuses on the total person with a consideration of the mental, emotional, intellectual, social, physical, and environmental dimensions which impact human health.

HNRS 1510 - Perspectives in the Life Sciences

An interdisciplinary approach to the life sciences. This introductory class deals with basic concepts, problems and issues of the life sciences. May be repeated up to 10 times for credit.

HNRS 1540 - Perspectives in the Humanities

An interdisciplinary approach to the arts and humanities. This introductory class deals with basic concepts, problems and issues of the arts and humanities.

HNRS 3900 - Honors Colloquium

Varied topics as described in the semester schedule; topics will be drawn from disciplines across the entire campus; may be taken more than once with different course content.

*MED 6020 - Diversity in Education
Topics in this course will include issues related to differences among groups of people and individuals based on ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, gender, exceptionalities, language, religion, sexual orientation, and geographical area as they impact teaching and learning.

*MENG 6510 - Eminent Writers

This seminar examines significant works of and relevant criticism on an influential writer or a small group of writers. This variable emphasis course may be repeated 10 times for credit with different subject matter.

MFET 2860 - Plastics/Composites Materials and Properties

Coverage of the most common commercial plastics including their additives, fillers, and fibers; includes common physical tests used to determine material characteristics; writing intensive.

MFET 3350 - Plastic and Composite Manufacturing

Design and processing of plastic and composite materials for industrial applications.

MFET 3350L - Plastic and Composite Manufacturing Lab

Application of the theory taught in MFET 3350.

MFET 3550 - Manufacturing Supervision

The application of supervision skills. Students will gain an understanding of; motivation of subordinates, personal leadership theories, problem-solving and decision-making techniques, organizational communication, employee selection, evaluation and training process, and organizational structures. Topics will include; the American Disabilities Act, OSHA and environmental issues, Equal opportunity Employment, and Affirmative Action issues. Three lectures per week.

MFET 3750 - Welding Metallurgy I

Metallurgical principles applied to welding and weldability of ferrous metals.

MFET 3750L - Welding Metallurgy I Lab

A “hands-on” lab that reinforces the concepts taught in MFET 3750of metallurgical principles applied to welding and weldability of ferrous metals.

MFET 3760 - Welding Metallurgy II

Metallurgical principles applied to welding and weldability of nonferrous metals.

MFET 3760L - Welding Metallurgy II Lab

A “hands-on” lab that reinforces the concepts taught in MFET 3760of metallurgical principles applied to welding and weldability of nonferrous metals.

MFET 3870 - Mold Design and Process Strategies Lecture/Lab

Overview of mold design and the development of strategies and techniques integrating CAD and CAE technologies for optimizing part quality, moldability, and productivity. Additional study on design and construction of various types of production molds that are used for processing plastics in final shape. Product design in relationship to molding techniques and various techniques and materials used to construct the molds are the major units of study.

MFET 4610 - Senior Project Planning and Estimating

This is designed as a capstone course for students and is to be taken in the senior year of their program. The course will teach students fundamental principles in Project Management, Cost Estimating, and Engineering Economics that will be necessary to successfully complete their Senior Project experience. Students must apply and gain departmental approval before entering Senior Project. Approval is based on an interview with department faculty and fulfilling the prerequisites listed on the “Senior Project Requirements Sheet” available from the department secretary. All students approved for Senior project will register for this course regardless of individual project group assignments.

MICR 1153 - Elementary Public Health

Principles and practices of public health, emphasizing prevention and control of communicable and degenerative diseases, and environmental health problems.

MICR 3403 - Tropical Diseases

Study of tropical diseases, caused by viral, bacterial, protozoan, fungal, and helminthic agents, including their transmission, disease course, pathogenesis, treatment, prevention and control using a multi-disciplinary approach integrating case studies, labs, epidemiology, immunopathology as well as microbiology.

NRSG 4400 - Population Health in Nursing

This course explores nursing in diverse populations in a local and global context emphasizing disease prevention, health promotion and cultural competency for the improvement of health status throughout the lifespan. Focus will include disparities in health and health care services, and the impact of behavior and lifestyle choices. This will include assisting individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations to prepare for and minimize negative health consequences. Students will examine frameworks of community and public health, assess and analyze prevalent population-based health issues, and explore population-based interventions.

NUTR 3420 - Multicultural Health and Nutrition

The application and understanding of social, religious, economic and aesthetic qualities of foods provides the knowledge for the explorations of the food patterns of various cultures. The understanding or world food problems as they pertain to the health will also be discussed.

PHYS 2600 - Laboratory Safety

An interdisciplinary, team-taught course that will be an overview of the major chemical, biological and physical safety issues related to science laboratories and field work.

POLS 3700 - Introduction to Public Administration

Presents basic theories, concepts, and analysis of current practices and problems in governmental administration.

PSY 3100 - Psychology of Diversity

This course examines the psychological issues associated with human diversity including culture, disabling conditions, gender, class, ethnicity, and others. It addresses the psychological principles underlying these issues and offers effective ways of dealing with these issues.

REC 3600 - Outdoor Adventure Recreation

Outdoor recreation agencies/businesses/organizations, site visits, services delivery, environmental impacts, legal issues, management. Skills: backpacking/hiking/camping/ropes course leadership, and use of technology in leisure research and programming.

REC 4550 - Outdoor Education Philosophies and Principles

Provides basic concepts of outdoor education, and direct, firsthand experience with learning resources beyond the classroom.

SOC 1020 - Social Problems

A study of major social problems in contemporary society, including issues of age, gender, family, race, ethnicity, wealth and poverty, politics, education, public safety, health care, substance abuse, and environment. Special emphasis is given to these issues and their consequences for today’s global and diverse society.

ZOOL 1010 - Animal Biology

A non-major’s introduction to cell biology, genetics, evolution, ecology, and animal diversity with emphasis on diversity of animal architecture and life strategies in relation to the diverse environments of Earth. The overriding theme is the process of evolution, its basis, and its implications for all animals, including humans. Three lecture/discussion hours a week.

ZOOL 1020 - Human Biology

Survey course for non-science majors. Course content includes basic structure and function of the human body, homeostasis, heredity, human evolution, and ecology. Implications for personal health, bioethical and environmental issues and the impact of each of these on society will be examined.

ZOOL 3450 – Ecology

Study of the relationships of organisms and their environment.

ZOOL 3450L - Ecology Lab

Laboratory for Zoology 3450 - Ecology

ZOOL 4660 – Herpetology

Structure, function and evolutionary relati MICR 1153 - Elementary Public Health
Principles and practices of public health, emphasizing prevention and control of communicable and degenerative diseases, and environmental health problems.

MICR 3403 - Tropical Diseases

Study of tropical diseases, caused by viral, bacterial, protozoan, fungal, and helminthic agents, including their transmission, disease course, pathogenesis, treatment, prevention and control using a multi-disciplinary approach integrating case studies, labs, epidemiology, immunopathology as well as microbiology.

NRSG 4400 - Population Health in Nursing

This course explores nursing in diverse populations in a local and global context emphasizing disease prevention, health promotion and cultural competency for the improvement of health status throughout the lifespan. Focus will include disparities in health and health care services, and the impact of behavior and lifestyle choices. This will include assisting individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations to prepare for and minimize negative health consequences. Students will examine frameworks of community and public health, assess and analyze prevalent population-based health issues, and explore population-based interventions.

NUTR 3420 - Multicultural Health and Nutrition

The application and understanding of social, religious, economic and aesthetic qualities of foods provides the knowledge for the explorations of the food patterns of various cultures. The understanding or world food problems as they pertain to the health will also be discussed.

PHYS 2600 - Laboratory Safety

An interdisciplinary, team-taught course that will be an overview of the major chemical, biological and physical safety issues related to science laboratories and field work.
POLS 3700 - Introduction to Public Administration
Presents basic theories, concepts, and analysis of current practices and problems in governmental administration.

PSY 3100 - Psychology of Diversity

This course examines the psychological issues associated with human diversity including culture, disabling conditions, gender, class, ethnicity, and others. It addresses the psychological principles underlying these issues and offers effective ways of dealing with these issues.

REC 3600 - Outdoor Adventure Recreation

Outdoor recreation agencies/businesses/organizations, site visits, services delivery, environmental impacts, legal issues, management. Skills: backpacking/hiking/camping/ropes course leadership, and use of technology in leisure research and programming.

REC 4550 - Outdoor Education Philosophies and Principles

Provides basic concepts of outdoor education, and direct, firsthand experience with learning resources beyond the classroom.

SOC 1020 - Social Problems

A study of major social problems in contemporary society, including issues of age, gender, family, race, ethnicity, wealth and poverty, politics, education, public safety, health care, substance abuse, and environment. Special emphasis is given to these issues and their consequences for today’s global and diverse society.

ZOOL 1010 - Animal Biology

A non-major’s introduction to cell biology, genetics, evolution, ecology, and animal diversity with emphasis on diversity of animal architecture and life strategies in relation to the diverse environments of Earth. The overriding theme is the process of evolution, its basis, and its implications for all animals, including humans. Three lecture/discussion hours a week.

ZOOL 1020 - Human Biology

Survey course for non-science majors. Course content includes basic structure and function of the human body, homeostasis, heredity, human evolution, and ecology. Implications for personal health, bioethical and environmental issues and the impact of each of these on society will be examined.

ZOOL 3450 – Ecology

Study of the relationships of organisms and their environment.

ZOOL 3450L - Ecology Lab

Laboratory for Zoology 3450 - Ecology

ZOOL 4660 – Herpetology
Structure, function and evolutionary relationships of amphibians and reptiles.
*graduate level course


The website URL where the inventory of course offerings with sustainability content is publicly available:
A brief description of the methodology the institution followed to complete the course inventory:

Courses were identified using the inventory of courses from WSU’s existing Environmental Studies Major and Minor, the WSU course catalog, from input from the University Environmental Issues Committee, and from discussions with individual faculty members, deans, department chairs, and the Provost.

Timeframe: Fall 2011-Spring 2013


How did the institution count courses with multiple offerings or sections in the inventory?:
Each offering or section of a course was counted as an individual course

A brief description of how courses with multiple offerings or sections were counted (if different from the options outlined above):
---

Which of the following course types were included in the inventory?:
Yes or No
Internships No
Practicums No
Independent study No
Special topics Yes
Thesis/dissertation Yes
Clinical Yes
Physical education Yes
Performance arts Yes

Does the institution designate sustainability courses in its catalog of course offerings?:
No

Does the institution designate sustainability courses on student transcripts?:
No

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.