Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 52.43
Liaison Wesley Enterline
Submission Date Nov. 13, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.25 / 4.00 Wesley Enterline
Sustainability Coordinator
Facilities Planning and Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a published strategic plan or equivalent guiding document that includes sustainability at a high level? :
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

STRATEGIC PLAN
GOAL 3: Diversity and Inclusion: We will foster diversity and inclusion.
OBJECTIVE 2: We will continue to create an inclusive campus culture where different perspectives are respected and individuals feel valued.
- Primary Action: Support and implement programs that are geared towards fostering an inclusive, respectful campus environment.
- Here's how: Empower the Chancellor's Inclusive Excellence Committee to develop a plan for supporting, implementing, and evaluating programs that will help the campus build a more inclusive, respectful campus culture for all - students, staff, and faculty; use evaluation results to identify areas where programs can be implemented and improvements can be made.
- Key Performance Indicators: Increased sense of belonging as determined by definition of and mechanism for measuring it amongst students, staff, and faculty. Documentation of programs and opportunities that promote a sense of belonging for students, staff, and faculty.

STRATEGIC PLAN
GOAL 4: Strengthening Resources - We will strengthen our resources.
OBJECTIVE 2: We will enhance our operational efficiency and effectiveness.
- Primary Action: Make operational improvements to ensure alignment with student needs, university priorities, institutional capacity, and UW system's CORE project on efficiencies in budget systems, human resources, information technology, and procurement.
- Here's how: Review organizational policies, processes, and efficiencies in operations that could include areas such as student transactions, facilities, budget systems, human resources, information technology, and procurement to identify priority areas for improvement; develop a plan for improvements across all areas over time.
- Key Performance Indicator: Increased operational efficiencies based on the establishment of baseline data on identified improvement areas.

STRATEGIC PLAN
GOAL 5: Partnerships and Relationships - We will deepen partnerships and relationships.
OBJECTIVE 1: We will seek opportunities to build new partnerships with community, business, and governmental organizations in support of our mission.
- Primary Action: Identify and support the development of strategic, mutually beneficial partnerships.
- Here's how: Define the characteristics of strategic, mutually beneficial partnerships; use definition to develop and evaluate new partnerships.
- Key Performance Indicators: Increased number of new partnerships. Impact of new partnerships.


A copy of the strategic plan:
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The website URL where the strategic plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have a published sustainability plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
No

A copy of the sustainability plan:
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The website URL where the sustainability plan is publicly available:
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Does the institution have a published climate action plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
No

A copy of the climate action plan:
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The website URL where the climate action plan is publicly available:
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Does the institution have other published plans that address sustainability or include measurable sustainability objectives (e.g. campus master plan, physical campus plan, diversity plan, human resources plan)? :
Yes

A list of other published plans that address sustainability, including public website URLs (if available):

CAMPUS MASTER PLAN - https://www.uww.edu/masterplan

- Master Plan Proposals: EMBRACE SUSTAINABILITY

Topography, native planting, views, and sustainable building features enrich the campus in some locations, but have not been embraced campus-wide. The Master Plan will further embrace sustainable practices by highlighting natural features unique to Whitewater, promoting efficient use of resources, and connecting people with each other and with their environment.

SUSTAINABILITY FOCUS AREA
Pursuing sustainability in the Master Plan allows campus to meet its facility needs with sensitive proposals that assess a holistic consideration of interrelated issues. As a result, the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater’s commitment to sustainability is evident across many aspects of its operations. Several facets of the Comprehensive Campus Master Plan have important sustainability considerations.

The plan consolidates new development in previously developed areas. This results in preserved natural landscapes, redevelopment of gray-fields, and a compact, walkable campus that decreases automobile dependence for trips between campus destinations.

Site planning prioritizes southern and northern exposure over eastern and western exposure where heat gain is more difficult to control, minimizing energy use of new buildings. Redevelopment of surface parking lots into building and open space reduces the impervious surface, thereby reducing stormwater runoff and will provide opportunities for infiltration. Existing buildings will be reused to reduce waste and resource consumption.

In conjunction with the City of Whitewater’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, new bicycle infrastructure will encourage more members of the University community to bike to campus. The University can further promote cycling by providing more bicycle-oriented amenities, including covered bicycle parking, storage, changing and shower facilities, and bicycle service.

Many other opportunities exist to implement sustainable initiatives on campus. Discussions throughout the Comprehensive Campus Master Plan process touched on opportunities to integrate sustainability education into landscapes and buildings, stormwater management best practices, and reducing energy usage in existing buildings by shutting them down in off hours and months.

A future sustainability plan is recommended to provide an opportunity for the University to map out an approach for campus wide sustainability.

SUSTAINABILITY PLAN

A Sustainability Plan will provide the opportunity to address the full range of initiatives necessary to realize the University’s commitment to sustainability indicated by their signing of the American College and University President’s Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and their current Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS self-assessment). All aspects of campus sustainability, including operations issues related to energy and waste and building design and construction considerations, will be addressed.

ACADEMIC PLAN

The University's Academic Plan continues our institutional commitment to AAC&U's Liberal Education & America's Promise (LEAP), which includes the following Essential Learning Outcomes that have also informed our General Education Learning Outcomes:

Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World
- Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories,
languages, and the arts - Focused by engagement with big questions, both contemporary and enduring

Personal and Social Responsibility, including:
- Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global; Intercultural knowledge and competence; Ethical reasoning and action; Foundations and skills for lifelong learning; Anchored through active involvement with diverse communities and real-world challenges - Anchored through active involvement with diverse communities and real-world challenges

A'VIANDS DINING - "NATURALLY" SUSTAINABILITY PLAN
A’viands is proud to be an industry leader in sustainability efforts. We plan to implement our custom sustainability program, aptly named Naturally. Naturally is a program developed by A’viands that utilizes marketing and training materials to educate customers and team members about sustainable practices. This program ensures that our staff is using natural resources in a responsible manner while encouraging our guests to do the same. Through our efforts, we have received national accreditation from sustainability groups at several of our locations.

A’viands believes that being a part of the solution to the world’s environmental problems boosts customer loyalty and pride for their institution. As such, we will implement our Naturally program to educate customers and team members about sustainable practices in the workplace. Marketing materials will be used to educate customers on sustainable initiatives at UW‐WHITEWATER and how they can help, especially with recycling and food waste initiatives.

Naturally was developed by A’viands to promote education and sustainable practices within our dining areas. The Naturally mission and five commitments use products and processes that take into consideration our actions to decrease our carbon footprint while offering operational choices that have an economic and ecological impact. It is our goal to not only implement a sustainable initiative, but educate our clients on our commitments towards creating a greener future.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum and the published plans in which each objective is included:

ACADEMIC PLAN

The University's Academic Plan continues our institutional commitment to AAC&U's Liberal Education & America's Promise (LEAP), which includes the following Essential Learning Outcomes that have also informed our General Education Learning Outcomes:

Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World
- Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts - Focused by engagement with big questions, both contemporary and enduring

Personal and Social Responsibility, including:
- Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global; Intercultural knowledge and competence; Ethical reasoning and action; Foundations and skills for lifelong learning; Anchored through active involvement with diverse communities and real-world challenges - Anchored through active involvement with diverse communities and real-world challenges


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Research?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Research and the published plans in which each objective is included:

No measurable objectives were measured in any of these reports.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MASTER PLAN

Many other opportunities exist to implement sustainable initiatives on campus. Discussions throughout the Comprehensive Campus Master Plan process touched on opportunities to integrate sustainability education into landscapes and buildings, stormwater management best practices, and reducing energy usage in existing buildings by shutting them down in off hours and months.

MASTER PLAN-GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Engage with Community: Develop a compact, residential campus with amenities for students, faculty, and staff that promote interaction, enhance quality of life, and accommodate activity seven days a week.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MASTER PLAN - GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Strengthen Identity: Build on existing strengths to further distinguish the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater through its physical campus; define campus edges and a clear arrival experience to welcome and encourage engagement with the community.

STRATEGIC PLAN
GOAL 5: Partnerships and Relationships - We will deepen partnerships and relationships.
OBJECTIVE 1: We will seek opportunities to build new partnerships with community, business, and governmental organizations in support of our mission.
- Primary Action: Identify and support the development of strategic, mutually beneficial partnerships.
- Here's how: Define the characteristics of strategic, mutually beneficial partnerships; use definition to develop and evaluate new partnerships.
- Key Performance Indicators: Increased number of new partnerships. Impact of new partnerships.

UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is to:
- Provide continuing education and outreach programs as integrated institutional activities.
- Create and maintain a positive and inviting environment for multicultural students, students with disabilities, and nontraditional students, and provide support services and programs for them. Serve as a regional cultural and economic resource center through its service initiatives.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate and the published plans in which each objective is included:

No measurable objectives were measured in any of these reports.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MASTER PLAN - EXEC SUMMARY AND KEY RECOMMENDATIONS

Site planning prioritizes southern and northern exposure over eastern and western exposure where heat gain is more difficult to control, minimizing energy use of new buildings. Existing buildings will be reused to reduce waste and resource consumption.

Many existing buildings require renovation to facilitate modern pedagogy and universal accessibility. Other aging buildings in the core have short-term value as swing space to facilitate renovation but
will ultimately be removed and returned to open space in the future.

New building orientation is optimized to minimize energy usage and existing buildings are reused to reduce waste and resource consumption.

MASTER PLAN PROPOSALS - PARKING
The Comprehensive Campus Master Plan clusters new development close to the academic core to preserve sensitive natural features. This strategy results in displacement of surface parking as lots are reconfigured to accommodate new buildings. Siting new buildings in gray fields, or parking lots, is a sustainable practice recommended.

MASTER PLAN PROPOSALS - SUSTAINABILITY
Site planning prioritizes southern and northern exposure over eastern and western exposure where heat gain is more difficult to control, minimizing energy use of new buildings. Redevelopment of surface parking lots into building and open space reduces the impervious surface, thereby reducing stormwater runoff and will provide opportunities for infiltration. Existing buildings will be reused to reduce waste and resource consumption.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy and the published plans in which each objective is included:

No measurable objectives were measured in any of these reports.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining and the published plans in which each objective is included:

DINING RFP REQUIREMENTS

The most recent RFP states "Describe purchasing practices that include sustainable sources and meet the University’s goal of 10 percent or more of purchases from local/regional producers." This 10% goal represents a measurable objective from an institutional perspective. Additionally, the RFP states "The Contractor will collaborate with the University for the potential purchase and use of products grown locally, to include the University Garden, if said products meet the appropriate risk management, health codes, etc. The Contractor will work with the University to develop and implement the sustainable dining plan. The University encourages a minimum of 15% of purchases be made from local producers with an expectation for growth in this area over the life of the Contract. The Contractor will provide monthly procurement reports specifying purchases made with local producers."

The RFP also states "Upon request, the Contractor will be required to collaborate with the University and the City of Whitewater to develop a food separation process no later than six months following the request." and "The Contractor is encouraged to have 100% of dining vehicles rated as low emission, super ultra-low emission, or zero emission."


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MASTER PLAN - EXEC SUMMARY

The plan consolidates new development in previously developed areas. This results in preserved natural landscapes, redevelopment of gray-fields, and a compact, walkable campus that decreases automobile dependence for trips between campus destinations.

MASTER PLAN - NATURAL SYSTEMS - NATURAL FEATURES AND TOPOGRAPHY
Many of the natural areas identified in Figure 19 are protected under the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act (LAWCON). LAWCON funds are federal monies that can be used for the planning, acquisition, and development of land and water outdoor recreation facilities. Congress intended this investment of public funds to be permanent. Section 6(f) of the Act requires all funded lands to be retained and used solely for outdoor recreation in perpetuity. Any conversion of these lands to uses other than outdoor recreation must be approved by the National Park Service. The Park Service will only consider approval if all alternatives to the conversion have been evaluated and rejected on a sound basis. If approved, the state must acquire replacement lands of at least equal fair market value and recreational usefulness. This designation applies to some areas of the UW-Whitewater campus, including some land that is not contiguous with the nature preserve and do not have the same high quality of native landscape. In the past, the University has successfully transferred LAWCON designation between some of these less ecologically sensitive areas and other state-owned land in order to establish some desirable development sites. While this legal process takes years to complete, it is an option to allow the University to consider future development on current LAWCON designated land. See Figure 61 on page 73 for LAWCON boundaries.

A palette of prairie species has been incorporated into some areas of the campus landscapes. Students, faculty, and staff often cite these areas of the grounds as a source of pride and identity for the University. Along Main Street in the historic core of the campus, a collection of significant trees, many of mature size and age, has been designated as an arboretum. This landscape contributes to the character of campus and reflects the history of the site and the institution. Current campus policies provide a re-planting strategy of 2 to 1 as trees are removed purposely or by attrition. Plan proposals appropriately continue to preserve this area as campus arboretum.

MASTER PLAN - LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Landscape design guidelines emerge from considerations for students with disabilities, sustainability objectives, new construction and remodeling projects identified in the master plan and landscape management processes.

The master plan recommends that the landscape character of the main academic core evolve to a more naturalistic landscape pattern. The drumlin slopes are too steep and continuous to accommodate field activities. Maintaining this space in mowed turf is not sustainable, nor does campus benefit significantly from having the lawn space. A more sustainable strategy would be to restore the ground plane of the drumlin to a native prairie or a infrequently mowed meadow. Once established this landscape will reduce maintenance costs, emissions, runoff, enhance wildlife habitat, restore the soil profile and fertility and result in a distinctive landscape character for the academic neighborhood and UW-Whitewater as whole. This transformation can be accomplished incrementally as funds and labor can be applied. Smaller open space areas in the academic core could also be modified similarly. A prairie or meadow landscape creating a definitive edge along the pedestrian malls and against surface parking lots would enhance wayfinding and would benefit stormwater management practices.

MASTER PLAN PROPOSALS - OPEN SPACE
The native landscape of glacial drumlin and prairie present in the nature preserve play a critical role in the open space system. The plan recommends the continued use of a consistent native plant palette for planting design to reinforce the regional landscape character in developed areas of campus.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing and the published plans in which each objective is included:

No measurable objectives were measured in any of these reports.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MASTER PLAN - SUMMARY

In conjunction with the City of Whitewater’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, new bicycle infrastructure will encourage more members of the University community to bike to campus. The University can further promote cycling by providing more bicycle-oriented amenities, including covered bicycle parking, storage, changing and shower facilities, and bicycle service.

VEHICULAR AND BICYCLE CIRCULATION

Automobile circulation is the dominant mode of vehicular circulation to campus due to limited alternative transportation options. A large portion of the University community travels longer distances to get to campus. Limited transportation options suggests many arrive by car. This predominance of automobile use impacts the University’s carbon footprint and requires a significant amount of land dedicated to parking. Members of the campus community living within a short distance of campus have the option to walk or ride their bikes to campus. Off-street bicycle trails on Schwager Drive and Fremont Road facilitate access from the north and connect the campus to regional recreational trails and natural amenities. Bicycle lanes are marked on campus along Warhawk Drive and Starin Road. Once on campus, pedestrian paths are not intended for bicycle use, and cyclists are expected to park their bikes and walk to their destination. Bicycle parking areas, particularly in covered locations, are often full. The City of Whitewater released a Pedestrian and Bicycle Plan in December 2013 that proposes a more extensive and connected network of bicycle amenities around the campus. This would include bicycle lanes along Main Street, Prairie Street, and Tratt Street and a neighborhood greenway along Prince Street, where pedestrians and cyclists would be given priority. A shared-use path west of the athletics district along Walton Drive would connect to Meadowstreet Park.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste and the published plans in which each objective is included:

No measurable objectives were measured in any of these reports.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Water?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Water and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MASTER PLAN

Redevelopment of surface parking lots into building and open space reduces the impervious surface, thereby reducing stormwater runoff and will provide opportunities for infiltration.

MASTER PLAN - LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
A prairie or meadow landscape creating a definitive edge along the pedestrian malls and against surface parking lots would enhance wayfinding and would benefit stormwater management practices.

MASTER PLAN - STORMWATER
Updates to the campus stormwater program including a TMDL Compliance Plan can be funded by a Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources’ (WDNR) Urban Nonpoint Source and Stormwater Grant program that provides a 70 percent state and a 30 percent local (campus) match. The permit requires that the stormwater program updates be completed between March 15, 2015, and March 31, 2018, depending on the specific requirement. The grant program if successful, will provide funding in the January 1, 2015, through December 31, 2017, timeframe. This grant time frame works well to provide funding that will allow completion of permit requirements within the permit time frame. Compliance with the permit will require the implementation of sustainable green stormwater infrastructure on campus.

However, the DOA has determined that the applicable stormwater regulations for each UW System campus shall include the most stringent of state and local ordinances to foster a good neighbor relationship with the local municipalities and counties where the campuses are located and to prevent degradation of the state’s water resources. The master plan recommends that UW-Whitewater aspire to most stringent stormwater management requirements as a responsible steward and in keeping with the goals of a sustainable institution.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability and the published plans in which each objective is included:

STRATEGIC PLAN

GOAL 3: Diversity and Inclusion - We will foster diversity and inclusion
OBJECTIVE 2: We will continue to create an inclusive campus culture where different perspectives are respected and individuals feel valued.

- Primary Action: Support and implement programs that are geared towards fostering an inclusive, respectful campus environment.
- Here's how: Empower the Chancellor's Inclusive Excellence Committee to develop a plan for supporting, implementing, and evaluating programs that will help the campus build a more inclusive, respectful campus culture for all - students, staff, and faculty; use evaluation results to identify areas where programs can be implemented and improvements can be made.
- Key Performance Indicators: Increased sense of belonging as determined by definition of and mechanism for measuring it amongst students, staff, and faculty. Documentation of programs and opportunities that promote a sense of belonging for students, staff, and faculty.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance and the published plans in which each objective is included:

No measurable objectives were measured in any of these reports.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work and the published plans in which each objective is included:

No measurable objectives were measured in any of these reports.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas (e.g. arts and culture or technology)?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MASTER PLAN

PLANNING: A future sustainability plan is recommended to provide an opportunity for the University to map out an approach for campus wide sustainability.


Does the institution have a formal statement in support of sustainability endorsed by its governing body (e.g. a mission statement that specifically includes sustainability and is endorsed by the Board of Trustees)? :
No

The formal statement in support of sustainability:
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The institution’s definition of sustainability (e.g. as included in a published statement or plan):

he University of Wisconsin-Whitewater's Sustainability Council, which includes at least three faculty members from different departments who conduct research, developed the following definition of sustainability research:

Sustainability is defined by the Bruntland Commission as "the ability to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." This is achieved through a focus on the three key principles of sustainability: environmental stewardship, economic opportunity, and social equity.


Is the institution an endorser or signatory of the following? :
Yes or No
The Earth Charter No
The Higher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI) No
ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter No
Second Nature’s Carbon Commitment (formerly known as the ACUPCC), Resilience Commitment, and/or integrated Climate Commitment Yes
The Talloires Declaration (TD) No
UN Global Compact No
Other multi-dimensional sustainability commitments (please specify below) No

A brief description of the institution’s formal sustainability commitments, including the specific initiatives selected above:
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Strategic plan - https://www.uww.edu/strategic-plan

Campus master plan or physical campus plan - http://www.uww.edu/masterplan

Sustainability plan - N/A

Climate action plan - Not formally adopted

Human resources strategic plan - N/A

State of Wisconsin Compensation Plan - https://dpm.wi.gov/Pages/Employees/CompensationPlan.aspx

2018 Affirmative Action Plan - http://www.uww.edu/Documents/adminaffairs/HR%20Diversity/AA%20PLAN%2004-2018.pdf

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.