Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 69.30
Liaison Dave Barbier
Submission Date May 14, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
OP-10: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 Shelly Janowski
Sustainability Coordinator
Facility Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of the legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance:

Schmeeckle Reserve is a natural area on the campus of UW-Stevens Point, a 280-acre conservancy area with 5 miles of trails and boardwalks, a 24-acre lake, and a large diversity of habitats that support numerous wildlife species.

The Reserve is managed to protect and restore natural communities of central Wisconsin, serve as an outdoor classroom for learning, and provide outdoor recreation opportunities.


Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify endangered and vulnerable species (including migratory species) with habitats on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify environmentally sensitive areas on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

The methodologies used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or environmentally sensitive areas (including most recent year assessed) and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:

We review the Natural Heritage Inventory when writing the plan to identify potential TES species, confirm this with boots on the ground surveys and then recommend appropriate actions if they are found during forest management activities. Various other wildlife, soil, forestry and groundcover surveys have been done.

We have numerous managed lands with separate Management Plans
Allen's acres
Bill Natzke Forest
CWES
Dudley Lake
Kurtz Forest
Kohler/Bushman
McLoud
Schmeekle
Severson Lake
Sternburg
Treehaven


A brief description of identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

We have a separate report for each managed area - here is an example for Allans Acres:

The Natural Heritage Inventory identifies locations of threatened and/or endangered plants and animals throughout Wisconsin. This inventory was consulted and no endangered resources were identified on your property.

Species of Greatest Conservation Need
Although no species on the Natural Heritage Inventory were found on the property, there are some species of conservation need that could use your property.
The gray wolf is listed as an endangered species. Gray wolf (Canis lupis), also referred to as timber wolf, is the largest wild members of the dog family. Males average about 10% larger in size than females. In addition, gray wolves have a massive head and neck important in killing prey, which results in larger fore feet than hind feet. Body weight, height, and foot prints are important distinguishing characteristics when comparing gray wolves to other wild and domestic canids. Wolves are social animals, living in a family group, or pack. Pack sizes in Wisconsin average 2-6 individuals with a few packs as large as 8-10 animals. A wolf pack's territory may cover 20-120 square miles.
Sand Snaketail is a rare species of dragonfly. Dragonflies occupy a variety of aquatic habitats, and tend to be either associated with flowing water, specialized wetlands such as peatlands, and specialized lake types. Species have a life cycle of two to three years which means the predominant life stage (larvae) have to have their requirements met for long periods of time.

A Tiger Beetle is a rare species. Tiger beetles require bare soil ranging from loose sand to packed clay. Partial to full exposure to sunlight also is required, although some species require openings in forested landscapes. Larvae cannot withstand excessive disturbance of the soil in which they burrow.

The Karner blue butterfly is a federally endangered species. The caterpillar stage feeds only the leaves of lupine so the butterfly’s habitat is prairies, opening and pine and oak barrens.

Effects of planned practices
The prescription for thinning in the oak and pine stands probably will not impact any of the above species greatly. A conversion of the red and jack pines to white pine will add species and size class diversity, good for habitat. Restoration of oak savanna and prairie habitat could be considered to improve habitat and food sources for some of these species.


A brief description of plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

We review the Natural Heritage Inventory when writing the plan to identify potential TES species, confirm this with boots on the ground surveys and then recommend appropriate actions if they are found during forest management activities.

Each College of Natural Resources field station has plans and programs in place:

-Treehaven is a 1,400-acre study area located near Tomahawk, WI. The Treehaven property supports a wide diversity of wildlife species indigenous to north central Wisconsin including threatened and endangered species, game and non-game species, and migratory species. Management of the Treehaven property focuses on maintaining and enhancing habitat for all of these wildlife species in the appropriate locations, with the appropriate intensity, and over the appropriate time scale. Treehaven is certified through the American Tree Farm System which applies the Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Systems (PEFC) endorsement.
http://www.uwsp.edu/cnr-ap/treehaven/Documents/maps/TH_LandManagementPlan.pdf

-The Central Wisconsin Environmental Station is located 17 miles from campus on Sunset Lake. During the school year, CWES serves as an environmental education center for area school children. During the summer, a wide variety of resident camp programs are offered for youth. Students from the College of Natural Resources are offered practical experience as teachers and counselors for both school year and summer programs.

-The Schmeeckle Reserve is a 280-acre facility bordering the UWSP campus. The reserve serves primarily as a natural preserve, but is also used as a study site for natural resources classes, and as a student recreation area. Students in natural resources can gain practical experiences in nature center programming and management by working in the new visitor center and on the reserve grounds.
When Schmeeckle Reserve was created in 1977, the committee established three priorities which would guide the management and development of the property. The 3 R's of Schmeeckle Reserve are: Refuge:Preserve and restore native ecological communities of Central Wisconsin; Research & Education:Serve as a living laboratory for teaching and research; Recreation:Serve the recreational needs of the campus and the community, when those uses are not in conflict with the first two priorities.
http://www4.uwsp.edu/cnr/schmeeckle/Education/


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.