Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 68.06
Liaison Brad Spanbauer
Submission Date June 18, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
OP-10: Landscape Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.25 / 2.00 Brian Kermath
Sustainability Director
Sustainability Office
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Figures required to calculate the total area of managed grounds::
Area
Total campus area 184.62 Acres
Footprint of the institution's buildings 26.57 Acres
Area of undeveloped land, excluding any protected areas 20 Acres

Area of managed grounds that is::
Area
Managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Plan 0 Acres
Managed in accordance with a sustainable landscape management program that includes an IPM plan and otherwise meets the criteria outlined 114.60 Acres
Managed organically, third party certified and/or protected 0 Acres

A copy of the IPM plan:
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The IPM plan :

Action Plan:
• Maximize the use of locally sourced, native plant material that is well suited for the local environment. Such plant material will require less fertilizer, irrigation, or pesticide. Emphasis should be placed upon perennials rather than annuals.
• Utilize the widest genetic base among individual species.
• Eliminate existing invasive exotic species.
• Include endangered, rare species to the extent possible.
• Include useful plants (e.g., pest deterrents, nitrogen-fixing plants, edibles and medicinals) for pedagogical and practical purposes.
• Reduce turf area and monocultures in favor of diverse native ground covers, tree canopies, understory trees and shrubbery.
• Maintain and update the campus tree inventory on an annual basis. Continue to participate in Tree Campus U.S.A.


A brief summary of the institution’s approach to sustainable landscape management:

Action Plan:
• Maximize the use of locally sourced, native plant material that is well suited for the local environment. Such plant material will require less fertilizer, irrigation, or pesticide. Emphasis should be placed upon perennials rather than annuals.
• Utilize the widest genetic base among individual species.
• Eliminate existing invasive exotic species.
• Include endangered, rare species to the extent possible.
• Include useful plants (e.g., pest deterrents, nitrogen-fixing plants, edibles and medicinals) for pedagogical and practical purposes.
• Reduce turf area and monocultures in favor of diverse native ground covers, tree canopies, understory trees and shrubbery.
• Maintain and update the campus tree inventory on an annual basis. Continue to participate in Tree Campus U.S.A.


A brief description of how the institution protects and uses existing vegetation, uses native and ecologically appropriate plants, and controls and manages invasive species:

The Campus Sustainability Plan adopted in 2008 notes that the campus has a history of educational plantings, including native prairie, and for the extensive riverfront to retain and encourage native trees and vegetation. The campus riverfront includes a state trail and Shapiro Park. For policies, the plan recommends: 1) increasing the planting of native species, and removal of invasive non-native species; 2) creation of more native prairie plantings. Native tree preference is also stated in the Campus Tree Care Plan developed in 2010 for a successful Tree Campus USA application


A brief description of the institution’s landscape materials management and waste minimization policies and practices:

The Campus Sustainability Plan adopted in 2008 notes that the campus has a history of using mulching lawnmowers, mulching leaves into turf areas in the fall, and chipping wood landscaping refuse to make mulch for campus shrubs and flower beds. In 2009, the Sustainability Office and Facilities Management co-funded the purchase of a compost tea machine to produce organic fertilizer. Starting in 2011, yard waste is diverted to the campus biodigester, from which solids are sent to a commercial composter.


A brief description of the institution’s organic soils management practices:

Action Plan:
• Maximize the use of locally sourced, native plant material that is well suited for the local environment. Such plant material will require less fertilizer, irrigation, or pesticide. Emphasis should be placed upon perennials rather than annuals.
• Utilize the widest genetic base among individual species.
• Eliminate existing invasive exotic species.
• Include endangered, rare species to the extent possible.
• Include useful plants (e.g., pest deterrents, nitrogen-fixing plants, edibles and medicinals) for pedagogical and practical purposes.
• Reduce turf area and monocultures in favor of diverse native ground covers, tree canopies, understory trees and shrubbery.
• Maintain and update the campus tree inventory on an annual basis. Continue to participate in Tree Campus U.S.A.


A brief description of the institution’s use of environmentally preferable materials in landscaping and grounds management:

Action Plan:
• Maximize the use of locally sourced, native plant material that is well suited for the local environment. Such plant material will require less fertilizer, irrigation, or pesticide. Emphasis should be placed upon perennials rather than annuals.
• Utilize the widest genetic base among individual species.
• Eliminate existing invasive exotic species.
• Include endangered, rare species to the extent possible.
• Include useful plants (e.g., pest deterrents, nitrogen-fixing plants, edibles and medicinals) for pedagogical and practical purposes.
• Reduce turf area and monocultures in favor of diverse native ground covers, tree canopies, understory trees and shrubbery.
• Maintain and update the campus tree inventory on an annual basis. Continue to participate in Tree Campus U.S.A.


A brief description of how the institution restores and/or maintains the integrity of the natural hydrology of the campus:

Action Plan:
• Maximize the use of locally sourced, native plant material that is well suited for the local environment. Such plant material will require less fertilizer, irrigation, or pesticide. Emphasis should be placed upon perennials rather than annuals.
• Utilize the widest genetic base among individual species.
• Eliminate existing invasive exotic species.
• Include endangered, rare species to the extent possible.
• Include useful plants (e.g., pest deterrents, nitrogen-fixing plants, edibles and medicinals) for pedagogical and practical purposes.
• Reduce turf area and monocultures in favor of diverse native ground covers, tree canopies, understory trees and shrubbery.
• Maintain and update the campus tree inventory on an annual basis. Continue to participate in Tree Campus U.S.A.


A brief description of how the institution reduces the environmental impacts of snow and ice removal (if applicable):

The Campus Sustainability Plan adopted in 2008 notes that the campus has a history of using an environmentally safer ice melting chemical treatment on sidewalks. The campus also maintains an excellent snow removal team, and recently upgraded the plow tractors used to clear walkways -- good mechanical removal of snow is our main strategy for minimizing the need for ice melting chemicals. Sand is used in parking areas, and the university uses a street sweeper to clean up sand and keep it from entering stormwater runoff.


A brief description of any certified and/or protected areas:

The University manages a state trail along the riverfront.


Is the institution recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation's Tree Campus USA program (if applicable)?:
Yes

The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable landscape management programs and practices is available:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.