Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Andrea Trimble
Submission Date May 29, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Virginia
OP-25: Hazardous Waste Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Jesse Warren
Sustainability Program Manager
Facilities Management - Energy & Utilities
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have strategies in place to safely dispose of all hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste and seek to minimize the presence of these materials on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of steps taken to reduce hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:

UVa's Environmental Health and Safety Office (EHS) has implemented a variety of programs to minimize the amount of hazardous, special, universal, and non-regulated chemical waste from UVa. Materials such as batteries, light bulbs, and certain chemicals are also collected throughout the University by EHS for recycling. The batteries are sent for processing to recover the metals. Fluorescent light bulbs are shipped to a facility where the mercury can be recovered and reused and the glass is recycled. The oil and antifreeze collected from from vehicles is recycled through Parking and Transportation. EHS also has a mercury thermometer replacement program and works with labs and departments to replace mercury-containing equipment. Solvents, including xylene and acetone, are recycled through EHS for reuse in other departments. In addition, EHS examines large generators of waste and works with them where possible to reduce their usage or switch to less hazardous chemicals. One example of this program involved working with the undergraduate chemistry labs to scale down the size of their experiments to reduce the quantity of waste generated from the large number of lab classes every semester.


A brief description of how the institution safely disposes of hazardous, universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:

EHS has protocols, procedures, and policies for safely labeling, collecting and disposing of chemical, radioactive, biohazardous, and other universal hazardous waste. Anyone who works in a laboratory/area where chemicals are used, or who generates Hazardous (Chemical) Waste, must be trained by Environmental Health & Safety (EHS). All wastes are disposed of in accordance with Federal, State, and local regulations.


A brief description of any significant hazardous material release incidents during the previous three years, including volume, impact and response/remediation:

10-17-2013 Power washing was conducted at Scott Stadium without proper capture of the resulting runoff. The runoff resulted in a white discharge, which was detected in Lodge Creek nearby. The exact volume of runoff is unknown. Upon detecting the discharge, the appropriate parties were contacted and they were able to determine that power washing had taken place. All future power washing was ceased until an appropriate plan for runoff capture was in place. Now all power washing runoff is vacuumed up before it reaches the storm sewer, with appropriate controls at storm sewer inlets.

11-3-2014 During the startup of Boiler 2R at the Main Heat Plant, at most 150 gallons of lime and water slurry were released from the pollution control system. Much of the spill was contained, but some entered the storm system. An air bladder was used to block the affected storm drain. The University’s vacuum truck was used to flush the affected storm drain. The pH of the closest outfall of the storm system was monitored and it stayed within a normal 6.5-7, indicating that the spill was contained. The exact quantity released is unknown, but the theoretical maximum was 150 gallons based on the data recorded by the plant control system. The failsafe, which failed and did not prevent the flow of lime slurry, was repaired. A runoff study and a project to control storm water contamination was already underway. Heat plant staff was immediately retrained on the operation of the inflatable air bladder.

12-24-2014 During the afternoon of December 24, the line from the lime slurry pump failed, causing the lime slurry to drain from the tank. Because it was raining, a storm drain that is normally blocked was opened to prevent flooding at the Main Heat Plant. The exact volume of slurry released is not known. The University’s vacuum truck was called in and the affected storm sewer was flushed with 2000 gallons of water. The next morning, it was discovered that some of the affected storm water reached a nearby stream. The affected outfall was intercepted and pumped to an adjacent retaining BMP. Elevated pH levels of 8.5 to 9 were found in the stream initially, which dropped upon intercept of the outfall. Some dead worms and minnows were observed in the stream. As mentioned, a larger contamination control project was already underway. The initial storm sewer inlet, which is normally closed, must now be visually monitored whenever it is open.


A brief description of any inventory system employed by the institution to facilitate the reuse or redistribution of laboratory chemicals:
---

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish all electronic waste generated by the institution?:
Yes

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by students?:
Yes

A brief description of the electronic waste recycling program(s):

Computers and related parallels are recycled through a recycling company contracted by the UVA. Cell phones, pagers, small electronics, batteries and media related materials (CDs, DVDs, audio and or video tapes) are sent to recyclers for proper refurbishments or recycling.


A brief description of steps taken to ensure that e-waste is recycled responsibly, workers’ basic safety is protected, and environmental standards are met:

Computers and related parallels are recycled through a recycling company contracted by the UVA and coordinated through Procurement and Diversity Services. Cell phones, pagers, small electronics, batteries and media related materials (CDs, DVDs, audio and or video tapes) are sent to recyclers for proper refurbishments or recycling. Our contract requires zero landfill for all electronic components and a recycling policy for packaging/logistics by-products. The supplier is certified under the EPA R2 program and the e-steward program.

Fluorescent lamps, ballasts and other lamps are collected by trained electrical mechanics and packaged for proper recycling practices.


The website URL where information about the institution’s hazardous and electronic-waste recycling programs is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.