Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 66.44
Liaison Mike Wilson
Submission Date Jan. 29, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Victoria
IN-4: Innovation 4

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.00 / 1.00 Lisa Church
Manager, Retail Operations
Food Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Title or keywords related to the innovative policy, practice, program, or outcome:
Improvements in Campus Waste Diversion through Food Services

A brief description of the innovative policy, practice, program, or outcome:

UVic’s overall waste diversion rate increased from 62% in the 2010/2011 academic year, to 66% in 2012/2013 - an increase of 6.5%. Over the same period, UVic’s total compostable waste increased from 609.4 tons to 791.8 tons - an increase of 30%!

These successes are due to a number of factors including increasing the availability of recycling and composting facilities, and targeted behavior change programs. But by far the areas with the highest waste diversion rates at UVic are in the buildings with food service (dining) facilities. These include the Cadboro Commons, University Centre, Grad Student Society and the University Club with diversion rates of between 84% and 90%. A chart of the results of a waste audit conducted in 2011 by collection area can be found here: https://www.uvic.ca/sustainability/assets/docs/UVic%20waste%20audit%20by%20building.pdf.

These remarkable waste diversion statistics are the result of the tremendous efforts by the staff that manage and work in the food service areas. There are no garbage, recycling or composting bins in the student dining areas. Instead, all waste is left on the food trays and placed on racks. The waste from the trays is then sorted by staff into compost, recycling and garbage in the kitchen areas. Similarly in the restaurant areas, staff manually sort leftovers into compost, recycling and garbage.

In addition, any recycling sorted that is refundable (for example, pop cans and plastic bottles) is donated to a different local school, youth group or sports team in the community each month. The amount raised for these groups ranges from $800 to $1,500 per month providing much needed charitable funding to organizations that have seen other sources of funding drastically cut in recent years. For more details on this program, see: http://ring.uvic.ca/news/recycling-caf. For her efforts, the Food Services retail outlets coordinator was a finalist for an EcoStar community service award.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 3, 2014

A brief description of any positive measurable outcomes associated with the innovation (if not reported above):

UVic’s overall waste diversion rate increased from 62% in the 2010/2011 academic year, to 66% in 2012/2013 - an increase of 10%.

Over the same period, UVic’s total compostable waste increased from 609.4 tons to 791.8 tons - an increase of 30%.

Diversion rates are highest in food service (dining) areas, ranging from 84 to 90%.


A letter of affirmation from an individual with relevant expertise:
Which of the following STARS subcategories does the innovation most closely relate to? (Select all that apply up to a maximum of five):
Yes or No
Curriculum No
Research No
Campus Engagement No
Public Engagement Yes
Air & Climate No
Buildings No
Dining Services No
Energy No
Grounds No
Purchasing No
Transportation No
Waste Yes
Water No
Coordination, Planning & Governance No
Diversity & Affordability No
Health, Wellbeing & Work No
Investment No

Other topic(s) that the innovation relates to that are not listed above:
---

The website URL where information about the innovation is available:

UVic’s overall waste diversion rate increased from 62% in the 2010/2011 academic year, to 66% in 2012/2013 - an increase of 10%. Over the same period, UVic’s total compostable waste increased from 609.4 tons to 791.8 tons - an increase of 30%!

These successes are due to a number of factors including increasing the availability of recycling and composting facilities, and targeted behavior change programs. But by far the areas with the highest waste diversion rates at UVic are in the buildings with food service (dining) facilities. These include the Cadboro Commons, University Centre, Grad Student Society and the University Club with diversion rates of between 84% and 90%. A chart of the results of a waste audit conducted in 2011 by collection area can be found here: https://www.uvic.ca/sustainability/assets/docs/UVic%20waste%20audit%20by%20building.pdf.

These remarkable waste diversion statistics are the result of the tremendous efforts by the staff that manage and work in the food service areas. There are no garbage, recycling or composting bins in the student dining areas. Instead, all waste is left on the food trays and placed on racks. The waste from the trays is then sorted by staff into compost, recycling and garbage in the kitchen areas. Similarly in the restaurant areas, staff manually sort leftovers into compost, recycling and garbage.

In addition, any recycling sorted that is refundable (for example, pop cans and plastic bottles) is donated to a different local school, youth group or sports team in the community each month. The amount raised for these groups ranges from $800 to $1,500 per month providing much needed charitable funding to organizations that have seen other sources of funding drastically cut in recent years. For more details on this program, see: http://ring.uvic.ca/news/recycling-caf. For her efforts, the Food Services retail outlets coordinator was a finalist for an EcoStar community service award.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.