Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 46.29
Liaison Thomas Frazer
Submission Date March 4, 2022

STARS v2.2

University of South Florida
OP-9: Landscape Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.00 / 2.00 Suchi Daniels
Sustainability Manager
Facilities Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Total campus area:
1,634 Acres

Figures required to calculate the total area of managed grounds:
Area (double-counting is not allowed)
Area managed organically, without the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides 0 Acres
Area managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program that uses selected chemicals only when needed 0 Acres
Area managed using conventional, chemical-based landscape management practices 716 Acres
Total area of managed grounds 716 Acres

A brief description of any land excluded from the area of managed grounds:

The Grounds Department maintains 635 acres, of which 322 is grass and the remainder consists of garages, shrubbery and plant beds. USF Physical Plant does not treat the grass lawns. Shrubs and plant beds are treated on an "as needed basis" in compliance with EPA's "Four Tiered Approach." USF pest control products in use are approved by USF Environmental Health and Safety.
http://usfweb2.usf.edu/eh&s/


Percentage of grounds managed organically:
0

A brief description of the organic landscape management program:

The Grounds Department maintains 635 acres, of which 322 is grass and the remainder consists of garages, shrubbery and plant beds. USF Physical Plant does not treat the grass lawns. Shrubs and plant beds are treated on an "as needed basis" in compliance with EPA's "Four Tiered Approach." USF pest control products in use are approved by USF Environmental Health and Safety.
http://usfweb2.usf.edu/eh&s/


Percentage of grounds managed in accordance with an IPM program:
0

A copy of the IPM plan or program:
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A brief description of the IPM program:
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A brief description of the institution's approach to plant stewardship:

USF has given priority to using native plant species and drought-tolerant species for many years, especially with the institutional focus on sustainability and design of LEED buildings. Recent projects feature the native landscapes, including the Patel Center for Global Solutions, the Interdisciplinary Science Center, the Park at
Collins, and many other un-named campus landscape improvements. The USF Botanical Gardens provides on-going university and community opportunities for learning about native landscape plants with lectures, workshops, weekend festivals, community garden, and plant shop. It consists of 16 acres of gardens and is part of the Greenway on the USF Tampa campus. The Gardens maintain a living collection of more than 3,000 of plants, animals and natural habitats. The gardens house ongoing research in medical botany and provide opportunities for service-learning to USF students. With about 35,000 annual visitors, the gardens serve as an important outreach component of USF. Please see: http://gardens.usf.edu/


A brief description of the institution's approach to hydrology and water use:

Tampa: The 10‐year plan for stormwater management focuses on increasing pervious area throughout the campus. In addition, the 10‐year plan implements stormwater management Best Management Practices (BMPs) to improve water quality on campus and beyond in downstream waters off‐campus.

Within the campus’ West Basin, construction of pond 204B provides water quality treatment prior to runoff entering Lake Behnke and serves to lower the peak stage elevation in the Lake. The ditch south/east of Shriners (204C2) and its future expansion to the north (204C) will help reduce localized roadway flooding, currently occurring during certain storm events for areas draining to pond 204C.

In addition, a riparian way is proposed to the Central Quadrangle from MLK Plaza and the Marshall Student Center to a new pond south of Fine Arts Building, which will receive roof runoff and condensate from adjacent buildings. This feature will serve to divert runoff from entering pipe networks, lower the peak stage of Lake Behnke, improve water quality, and provide a resource for subsequent reuse while contributing aesthetic value to the Central Quad in a way that gives visibility to stormwater management and the hydrologic cycle.

Within the campus’ East Basin, additional stormwater system components are to be added to address the changes in the land use. To complete the Greenway system, impervious pavement is proposed to be removed from within the Greenway and replaced with stormwater ponds and open space. Wet pond 104A‐1 and future pond 104A will serve to provide the needed stormwater treatment, attenuation and flood prevention.

The University shall enhance the stormwater facilities and greenway system with the following appropriate design features:
• Gradual and varied side slopes,
• Natural aquatic plant material,
• Walkways/boardwalks,
• Seasonal hardwoods and native-understory plant materials, and Properly designed "feature" ponds that include retention liners and sufficient water flows and aeration to maintain a healthy environment and habitat for wildlife.

Sarasota/Manatee: The stormwater management plan for the Sarasota/Manatee campus is currently set up for future expansion. The system collects overland stormwater runoff into inlets and pipes it to an onsite wet detention pond. The pond treats stormwater by detaining it and slowly releasing it downstream to maximize treatment.

St. Petersburg: see: http://www.usf.edu/administrative-services/facilities-planning/documents/master-goals-policies.pdf Increasing on-site infiltration, USF storm
water policy - eliminate pollution and contaminates from stormwater run-off http://usfweb2.usf.edu/eh&s/Stormwater/index.html, compliance with FLDEP NPDES
rule 62-621.00(7)(b), FAC


A brief description of the institution's approach to landscape materials management and waste minimization:

Grass clippings are mulched directly back into the landscape; they are not collected.


A brief description of the institution's approach to energy-efficient landscape design:

Campus landscape design incorporates drought tolerant native and adaptive plants. Tree Mapping is in process on all three campuses with over 16,000 trees mapped. Tree mapping assists planners and grounds in the management of new trees, removal of existing trees, and biodiversity. Tree canopies on all three campuses help to reduce the overall heat island effect thereby passively contribution to the reduction of cooling loads on buildings.


A brief description of other sustainable landscape management practices employed by the institution:

USF has given priority to using native plant species and drought-tolerant species for many years, especially with the institutional focus on sustainability and design of LEED buildings. Recent projects feature the native landscapes, including the Patel Center for Global Solutions, the Interdisciplinary Science Center, the Park at
Collins, and many other un-named campus landscape improvements. The USF Botanical Gardens provides on-going university and community opportunities for learning about native landscape plants with lectures, workshops, weekend festivals, community garden, and plant shop. It consists of 16 acres of gardens and is part of the Greenway on the USF Tampa campus. The Gardens maintain a living collection of more than 3,000 of plants, animals and natural habitats. The gardens house ongoing research in medical botany and provide opportunities for service-learning to USF students. With about 35,000 annual visitors, the gardens serve as an important outreach component of USF. Please see: http://gardens.usf.edu/


Website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable landscape management program is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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