Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 65.64
Liaison Rob Andrejewski
Submission Date March 1, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Richmond
EN-1: Student Educators Program

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.20 / 4.00 Cassandra Collins
Sustainability Communications & Engagement Specialist
Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students enrolled for credit (headcount):
4002

Total number of students enrolled for credit that are served (i.e. directly targeted) by a student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program (avoid double-counting to the extent feasible):
3200

Percentage of students served by a peer-to-peer educator program:
79.96

Name of the student educators program:
University of Richmond Sustainability Advocates (URSA)

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (headcount):
2759

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:

University of Richmond Sustainability Advocates (URSA) is an Office for Sustainability student program that empowers students to learn about sustainability at UR, adopt personal actions that reduce their environmental footprint, engage in sustainability events, and support campus sustainability initiatives. URSA runs the Green Room Program, which allows campus apartments and residence hall rooms to earn a certification for sustainable habits. URSA also helps plan the University's participation in Richmond's annual Environmental Film Festival, hosts an annual clothing swap, organizes movie nights for students to watch sustainability-focused documentaries, and recruits volunteers for zero waste athletic events.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected:

All University of Richmond students are invited to join the URSA Program. URSA members must complete 5 quizzes focused on different areas of sustainability, become green room certified, and attend an hour-long Intro to Sustainability meeting in order to formally join the group.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:

All students interested in joining URSA attend an Intro to Sustainability meeting before becoming confirmed members. This hour-long meeting educates attendees on sustainability efforts across the University, preparing them to share information with others during events URSA organizes or attends.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination):

Two paid student interns in the Office for Sustainability coordinate the program, the Office for Sustainability provides funds for events like movie nights, and Office for Sustainability staff support for Intro to Sustainability meetings.


Name of the student educators program (2nd program):
Cultural Advisors

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (2nd program):
2050

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (2nd program):

Cultural Advisors (CAs) are student leaders on campus who live in the residence halls and work with residents and residence life staff to make the halls are safe, welcoming, and supportive communities for all students. Cultural Advisors promote learning and understanding across differences, share information about campus resources on diversity and inclusion, and facilitate connections between and among residents. They also coordinate the weekly SpiderNights program which occurs most Saturday nights.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (2nd program):

Cultural Advisors (CAs) are recruited and selected early in the spring semester for the following academic year. Rising sophomores through seniors are eligible to apply. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, and have no disciplinary history. Students are encouraged to apply regardless of race, ethnicity, sexual identity, gender identity, faith tradition, ability status, or other areas of difference.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (2nd program):

The position requires that students return to campus a week before the start of the semester for training with Common Ground. Cultural Advisors must also attend regular meetings for supervision and on-going training. While there is no compensation for the position, benefits include extensive skill development in the areas of diversity, community-building, and event planning, collaborating with and learning from your fellow advisors, ready access to University administration, and the opportunity to become change agents on campus.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (2nd program):

CAs are given a programming budget for their residence halls. There is not any personal cost to the Cultural Advisor to participate in any aspects of the training or program.


Name of the student educators program (3rd program):
Wellness Education Bandits

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (3rd program):
3200

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (3rd program):

The Wellness Education Bandits (WEB) are a diverse group of UR students trained to educate their classmates about college lifestyle and wellness issues in a positive, interactive, fun, and non-judgemental manner. They provide information to their peers that promotes a healthy lifestyle that carries them through college and in to adulthood. Students participating in the program attend weekly meetings and volunteer at events.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (3rd program):

Students must submit an online application to be considered for the program.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (3rd program):

Comprehensive training prepares the WEB to provide confidential patient education sessions; facilitate dynamic outreach programs; encourage physical, mental, and spiritual health; create informative awareness events; and promote community support to create a health campus culture. The Bandits are dedicated to providing education and community support with sensitivity to race, gender, sexual orientation, culture, religious, and individual capabilities.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (3rd program):

The Student Health Center on campus coordinates the program, selects students to participate, and provides training.


A brief description of all other student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education programs, including the number of students served and how student educators are selected, trained, and supported by the institution:

Rethink Waste Trainings: Office for Sustainability interns partnered with Resident Assistants (RA's) in campus residence halls and apartments to educate on-campus students about how to recycle where they live. This involved setting up presentations for a whole residence hall floor and meeting with students to talk about what items to recycle, where to recycle them, and the University's waste diversion goals under the Rethink Waste campaign. Every intern who supported this program saw a demonstration of a Rethink Waste presentation, learned about recycling at the University in detail, and received training in how to talk about the program prior to meeting with campus residents. The Office for Sustainability paid interns for the time they spent doing Rethink Waste Trainings and provided any presentation materials or snacks needed during the meeting.


Total number of hours student educators are engaged in peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education activities annually (all programs):
3300

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.