Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Rob Andrejewski
Submission Date Feb. 15, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Richmond
OP-10: Landscape Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Steve Glass
Horticulturist/Landscape Mgr
Facilities
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Figures required to calculate the total area of managed grounds::
Area
Total campus area 322.50 Acres
Footprint of the institution's buildings 28.50 Acres
Area of undeveloped land, excluding any protected areas 29 Acres

Area of managed grounds that is::
Area
Managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Plan 263.50 Acres
Managed in accordance with a sustainable landscape management program that includes an IPM plan and otherwise meets the criteria outlined 0 Acres
Managed organically, third party certified and/or protected 1.50 Acres

A copy of the IPM plan:
---

The IPM plan :

UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT (IPM) PLAN

Paul H. Sandman
Integrated Pest Management Specialist Landscape Department
University of Richmond 28 Westhampton Way
University of Richmond, VA 23173 (804)289-8605
psandman@richmond.edu

INTRODUCTION
Pests are populations of living organism (animals, plants, or microorganism) that damage property or interfere with the aesthetics or use of University facilities for human purposes.

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) establishes a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health and environmental risks.

The University of Richmond has adopted this Integrated Pest Management Plan for the landscape and grounds the University manages. The plan outlines procedures to be followed to protect the health and safety of students, faculty, staff, and visitors from pest and pesticide hazards. The plan is designed to voluntarily comply with policies and regulations promulgated by the Department of Agriculture for public buildings and university facilities.

Objectives of this IPM plan include:
• Elimination of significant threats caused by pests to the health and safety of students, faculty, staff and the public.
• Prevention of loss or damage to landscapes or property by pests.
• Protection of environmental quality inside and outside buildings.

The goal of Integrated Pest Management is often not total elimination of a pest.
That is unrealistic. The goal is to minimize the problem to an acceptable level. This IPM plan will be stored in the office of the Landscape Department.
IPM COORDINATOR
The Landscape Department Manager or designee shall be the University of Richmond’s IPM Coordinator and be responsible to implement the IPM plan and to

coordinate pest management-related communications between the University of Richmond, service providers, faculty, staff and students.

ANNUAL REVIEW
This IPM Plan will be reviewed and revised annually by the IPM Specialist, the Landscape Department Manager and Assistant Manager, with input from the University’s Sustainability Manager and representatives of the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service.

POSTING AND NOTIFICATION OF PESTICIDE APPLICATIONS
When pesticide applications are scheduled at University of Richmond-managed grounds, pesticide applicators shall provide posting and notification in accordance with product label instructions. All students, faculty, and staff will have access to pesticide application information through the University’s Facilities Department website, http//facilities.richmond.edu/.

Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require notification. If pesticides other than least toxic pesticides are used, building occupants will be notified not less than 72 hours before the pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions (LEED 2009).

RECORD KEEPING & PUBLIC ACCESS TO INFORMATION
The University of Richmond will maintain records of all Service Provider visits and pest control treatments for at least three (3) years. Information regarding pest management activities will be made available to the public at the University of Richmond Landscape Department office.

TRAINING
All pesticide application staff will attend training required to maintain certification with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Periodic information and question/answer sessions may be offered to interested faculty, staff, and students to provide an overview of the University’s Integrated Pest Management activities.

GENERAL IPM STRATEGIES
Pest management strategies may include education, exclusion, sanitation, maintenance, biological and mechanical controls, and pre-approved, site-appropriate pesticides.

An Integrated Pest Management decision at the University of Richmond shall consist of the following steps:

1. Identify pest species.

2. Estimate pest populations and compare to established action thresholds.

3. Select the appropriate management tactics based on current on-site information.

4. Assess effectiveness of pest management.

5. Keep appropriate records.

Decisions concerning whether or not pesticides should be applied in a given situation will be based on a review of all available options. Efforts will be made to avoid the use of pesticides by adequate pest proofing of facilities, good sanitation practices, selection of pest-resistant plant materials, and appropriate horticultural practices.

When it is determined that a pesticide must be used in order to meet pest management objectives, the least-hazardous material, adequate for the job, will be chosen.

All pesticide storage, transportation, and application will be conducted in accordance with the requirement of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 United States Code136 et seq.), Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR, Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, University of Richmond policies and procedures, and local ordinances.

No person shall apply, store, or dispose of any pesticide on University of Richmond-managed property without an appropriate pesticide applicator license. All pesticide applicators will be trained in the principles and practices of IPM and the use of pesticides approved for use by the University. All applicators must comply with this IPM policy and follow appropriate regulations and label precautions when using pesticides in or around University facilities.

Pest-specific strategies will be included in the IPM Program Specifications provided to each service provider.

PEST-SPECIFIC STRATEGIES
The following strategies will be used for frequently encountered pests:

Weeds in Mulch Beds

Threshold: Any
1. When possible, pull or dig weeds up manually, being sure to remove root material, before the weeds are mature enough to produce seeds.
2. Apply pre-emergent weed preventer, such as FREEHANDTM or SNAPSHOTTM granules according to label directions, to all beds February-April and June- July. This is most effective if applied to bare ground before re-applying mulch, and watered in thoroughly. All granules will be immediately swept or blown off of sidewalks, patios, roads, etc. before the applicator leaves the treatment area.

3. Maintain 2-4 inches of clean mulch cover to inhibit weed growth and retain moisture.
4. When applying dye such as Mulch Magic to mulched areas, a liquid pre- emergent weed preventer, such as PENNANTTM (S-metolachlor 83.7%, one ounce per gallon of water) may be added to the dye mix, for areas where granular pre-emergent weed preventer has not yet been applied for the season.

Nutsedge or broad-leafed weeds in ornamental grass such as liriope (see #1,2,3 above):
When manual removal is not practicable, spot treat as early as possible with a selective herbicide labeled for nutsedge and broad-leafed weed control, such as BASAGRANTM (Sodium salt of bentazon 44%) mixed
0.75 ounces per gallon of water or equivalent. Manual removal of nutsedge is seldom effective, due to extensive underground rhizomes.

Grassy weeds in ornamental grass such as liriope (see #1,2,3 above):
When manual removal is not practicable, spot treat as early as possible with a selective grassy weed herbicide such as NUFARM SETHOXYDIMTM(Sethoxydim 13%) mixed 2.9 ounces per gallon of water or equivalent. Manual removal of bermuda grass is seldom effective, due to extensive underground rhizomes.

NOTE: BASAGRANTM and SETHOXYDIMTM can be mixed together in the same tank to control nutsedge, broad-leafed weeds, and grassy weeds in liriope beds where this is needed.

Broad-leafed or grassy weeds in open mulch areas (see #1,2,3 above):
When manual removal is not practicable, spot treat as early as possible With a non-selective herbicide, such as glyphosate 41% mixed 2.6 ounces per gallon of water or equivalent.

Broad-leafed or grassy weeds in sidewalk cracks, curbs, patios.

Threshold: Any

When manual removal is not practicable, spot treat as early as possible
with a mixture of both a non-selective weed killer and a pre-emergent weed preventer, such as 2.6 ounces of glyphosate 41% plus 1.0 ounce of PENNANTTM (S-metolachlor 83.7%) per gallon of water.

Poison Ivy near walkways and parking lots

Threshold: Any

When manual removal is not practicable, spot treat as early as possible with an

herbicide labeled for poison ivy control, such as glyphosate 41% mixed 2.6 ounces per gallon of water or equivalent.

Weeds in turf areas

General turf areas
Weed thresholds are high in general turf areas. The need for pre- and post-emergent herbicide applications may be made on a case by case basis.

Showcase warm-season turf areas - Bermuda, Zoysia such as the Baseball field, Practice fields, President’s Circle, …
Cultural practices such as spring fertilization in accordance with the Warm Season Nutrient Management Plan for the University of Richmond, and aeration and over-seeding can improve turf health, thereby minimizing opportunities for weeds to establish.

Apply pre-emergent weed preventer such as LESCO RONSTAR .95% PLUS FERTILIZERTM (Oxadiazon 0.95%) at the rate of 50 lbs per 6900 square feet. Granular pre-emergent herbicides should be thoroughly watered-in with at least ½ inch rainfall or irrigation. DO NOT apply pre-emergent weed preventer within 90 days prior to over-seeding. Consult the product label to insure non- interference with future over-seeding operations. All granules will be immediately swept or blown off of sidewalks, patios, roads, etc. before the applicator leaves the treatment area.

When broad-leafed weeds appear, spot treat with a broad-leafed weed killer such as COOLPOWERTM (MCPA 56.14%, Triclopyr 5%, Dicamba 3.6%) mixed 0.91 to 1.29 fluid ounces in 0.5 to 5.5 gallons of water to treat 1000 square feet. The higher rate can be used on dormant turf. Use the lower rate when warm season turf is actively growing. Consult the product label to insure non- interference with future over-seeding operations.

Showcase cool-season turf areas – Fescue (Front Wall, …)
Cultural practices such as fall fertilization in accordance with the Cool Season Nutrient Management Plan for the University of Richmond, and aeration and over-seeding can improve fescue turf health, thereby minimizing opportunities for weeds to establish.

Apply pre-emergent weed preventer such as a turf fertilizer containing BARRICADETM (Prodiamine) according to the manufacturer’s label directions during February – March and April – May. Granular pre-emergent herbicides should be thoroughly watered-in with at least ½ inch rainfall or irrigation. DO NOT apply pre-emergent weed preventer within 90 days prior to over-seeding. Consult the product label to insure non-interference with future over-seeding operations. All granules will be immediately swept or blown off of sidewalks, patios, roads, etc. before the applicator leaves the treatment area.

When broad-leafed weeds appear, spot treat with a broad-leafed weed killer such as COOLPOWERTM (MCPA 56.14%, Triclopyr 5%, Dicamba 3.6%) mixed 0.91 to 1.29 fluid ounces in 0.5 to 5.5 gallons of water to treat 1000 square feet. For fine fescues such as creeping red or Chewing’s, DO NOT apply
until the turf is 3 years old, and use the lower mix rate. Insects, fungus, and other diseases damaging ornamental plants
Prevention is the primary method of pest and disease control, including:

Choosing plant varieties that are hardy and well-suited to the micro- environment where they will be placed.

Inspecting new plants prior to planting to insure they are healthy.

Amending soil in planting areas as indicated by soil testing, to provide optimum conditions for plants to thrive, making them more resistant to diseases. Critical factors include maintaining optimum soil pH and nutrient balance for the specific plants.

Placing ornamental plants with sufficient space around them for adequate light and air circulation in their mature size.

Assuring adequate water and fertilizer are applied to keep plants healthy and resistant to attack.

Careful pruning and clean-up of clippings.

Cleanup of pruning tools with isopropyl alcohol to prevent spread of insects, fungi, and other diseases.

Early detection and quick treatment is essential to minimize the need for pesticide application. In addition to periodic surveys by the Integrated Pest Management Specialist (IPMS), ornamentals plants will be checked by all landscape staff who will alert the IPMS to suspected problems including spotting and yellowing of leaves, leaf drop, or other visible evidence of pests or disease.

Lacebugs damaging azaleas or rhododendrons:

Threshold: Significant stippling and yellowing of leaves

If the infestation affects small areas, portions of plants, apply contact insecticide such as insecticidal soap or horticultural oil mixed with water

according to the manufacturer’s label. If needed, repeat applications at 2- week intervals.

If the infestation is severe or does not subside after repeated treatment with regular insecticides, apply a foliar contact insecticide such as ASTROTM (Permethrin 36.8%) mixed 4 to 8 ounces per 100 gallons of water in the spring when pupae are emerging and adult flies are present.

Leaf miners in boxwoods:

Threshold: Noticeable leaf damage.

Apply foliar contact insecticide such as ASTROTM or PERMETHRIN SFRTM (Permethrin 36.8%) mixed 4 to 8 ounces per 100 gallons of water in the spring when pupae are emerging and adult flies are present. This pesticide is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or residues on crops or weeds. Do not apply this product or allow it to drift to crops or weeds on which bees are actively foraging.

Japanese Beetle Grubs in turf:

Threshold: 10-12 grubs per square foot (cut and peel back the sod layer to Inspect during July - August)

Apply appropriate insecticide in accordance with the manufacturer’s label directions.

Powdery mildew on peonies:

Consider moving the plants to a location where there is less moisture and more sunlight.

Replace with plants more resistant to fungi in shaded, moist environments, such as Leucothoe.

Fungicide application is not recommended.

Fruit Trees

Preventive treatment is important for successful fruit production. Detailed instructions are available in Virginia Cooperative Extension Publication 422-023 Growing Apples in Virginia. Products needed will include dormant oil, fungicide such as IMMUNOXTM (Myclobutanil 1.55%) mixed ½ oz per gallon of water and insecticide such ASTROTM or PERMETHRIN SFRTM ( Permethrin 36.8%) mixed ½ tsp per gallon of water. These may be used according to the following schedule:

Growth Stage Timing Pest Treatment Dormant Early April above 40oF Insect eggs Dormant oil
Green tips Leaves out 1/8 inch Insects, Fungi Permethrin, Myclobutanil Tight cluster Flower buds tight Insects, Fungi Permethrin, Myclobutanil Blooming (No spraying, harms bees)
Post-bloom Petals are falling Insects, Fungi Permethrin, Myclobutanil 10 days later Insects, Fungi Permethrin, Myclobutanil
10 days later Insects, Fungi Permethrin, Myclobutanil Every 12 – 14 days thru mid-August Insects, Fungi Permethrin, Myclobutanil
(If lots of rain, do this after 10 days from last spray)

Aquatic Pest Control

Prevention is the key to the control of algae and weeds in Westhampton Lake. Careful adherence to the University’s Nutrient Management Plan (Moyer, 2013) will reduce algae and weed problems due to runoff of excess fertilizer from the landscape within the lake’s watershed.

Periodic draw-down of the water level will be used to reduce the populations of certain nuisance aquatic weeds.

If chemical application is needed, the least aggressive products will be used that achieve an acceptable level of control.


Algae

Threshold: When algae is evident. It is critical to treat Chara and
Phormidium at the first signs of algal bloom.

Apply algaecide such as K-TEATM (Copper hydroxide 12.9%) at a rate of
0.7 to 3.4 gallons per acre-foot to visible algae populations. Use the lower rate for planktonic algae, and the higher rate for mats of filamentous algae.

Duckweed and other floating and emerged weeds:
Threshold: When duckweed covers 10% or more of the lake surface.

Apply aquatic herbicide such as REWARDTM (Diquat dibromide 37.3%) mixed at a rate of 1.5 to 3.0 ounces per gallon of water for water depths of 2 to 4 feet or RODEOTM (Glyphosate 53.8%) mixed at a rate of 2 ounces per gallon of water. Floating mats of vegetation may require retreatment after 24 hours.

ADD MORE PESTS AS APPROPRIATE.

References:

IPM Institute of North America, Inc. Sample Integrated Pest Management Plan 4510 Regent St., Madison, Wisconsin 53705 USA, 608-232-1410 Fax 608-232-1440 www.ipminstitute.org (Last accessed on April 25, 2014).

LEED 2009, LEED Reference Guide For GreenBuilding Operations & Maintenance 2009 Edition, U.S. Green Building Council.

Moyer, Allison (2013) Nutrient Management Plan Prepared For University of Richmond,
Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Virginia Cooperative Extension Service (2009) Growing Apples in Virginia, Publication 422-023. Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/422/422-023/422-023.html (Last accessed on April 25, 2014)

Virginia Cooperative Extension Service (2013) Pest Management Guide – Horticultural
& Forest Crops 2013. Virginia Tech and Virginia State University, National Institute for Food and Agriculture, United States Department of Agriculture.

Virginia Cooperative Extension Service, video education module Integrated Pest Management for Plant Diseases in the Home Garden and Landscape, Learning Module I: Integrated Pest Management, http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/PPWS/PPWS-14/PPWS-14.html, (Last accessed on April 25, 2014).


A brief summary of the institution’s approach to sustainable landscape management:

The University of Richmond is committed to developing a cultural shift across the university community to recognize that a sustainable landscape is a vital part of campus life. All new construction on campus avoids the use of irrigation systems by using native plants and less water-intensive plantings. Existing systems that require major renovations have been turned off and eliminated (example, Stern Plaza in the center of the historic campus). Sustainability is one of five themes in the campus master plan: "The University of Richmond is committed to environmental sustainability and is addressing the challenge head-on, from education to conservation, purchasing policies to land management." This influences practices in open space management. Recent redevelopment of the south campus has presented a rare opportunity to expand significantly the high-quality open space network of campus.


A brief description of how the institution protects and uses existing vegetation, uses native and ecologically appropriate plants, and controls and manages invasive species:

An Arboricultural Plan was completed in November of 2013 and is being utilized to assist in the management of 13 acres (144 trees) in the historic core of the campus. A Disc Golf Course was established on campus in 2011 in which 13 holes ran through a wooded area of campus. Dead trees were felled for safety reasons, logs ( some hollow) were left in place to benefit wildlife and reduce damage to the forest floor that would have resulted from their removal. In 2015, Landscape Services and the Office of Sustainability held two tree planting events in which students, faculty and staff planted 66 native trees, 4-7 feet tall. When new buildings are constructed, existing plant material and trees are moved when possible to other locations on campus. In the fall of 2015, plant material that is crowded and overgrown at an existing build was dug and replanted at a newly renovated dorm. This practice of transplanting crowded plant material is becoming standard practice. The controlling and managing of invasive species is ongoing, with the removal of invasive trees year round and the removal of invasive vines performed mainly in the winter months.


A brief description of the institution’s landscape materials management and waste minimization policies and practices:

All landscaping waste, including grass trimmings, are recycled/composted at an off campus facility.


A brief description of the institution’s organic soils management practices:

Organic compost is utilized in flower beds, new plant beds, when over seeding lawn areas, when required, to promote plant growth with reduced inorganic fertilizers. The Community Garden uses only organic soils and compost.


A brief description of the institution’s use of environmentally preferable materials in landscaping and grounds management:

In all new landscape construction projects and for plant replacements, native plants are given priority, ecologically appropriate plants are utilized at all times.


A brief description of how the institution restores and/or maintains the integrity of the natural hydrology of the campus:

All new construction on campus avoids the use of irrigation systems and existing systems that require major renovations have been turned off and eliminated (example, Stern Plaza in the center of the historic campus). At the Westhampton Center, a Bio Retention garden was established during renovation. Watering is limited primarily to new plantings and maintaining existing plants and turf as necessary to keep plants alive, but not necessarily to maintain aesthetic quality.


A brief description of how the institution reduces the environmental impacts of snow and ice removal (if applicable):

Surfaces to be treated, walks, roadways and parking lots have been prioritized to reduce applications of ice melt products in low use areas. A bulk rock salt storage facility is being constructed to reduce run of from stored rock salt.


A brief description of any certified and/or protected areas:

A Community Garden for students, faculty and staff was established in the spring of 2009. The 1.5 acre garden is all organic, allowing no inorganic fertilizers or pesticides.


Is the institution recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation's Tree Campus USA program (if applicable)?:
No

The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable landscape management programs and practices is available:

At this time only the Community Garden is maintained organically. The campus has a Nutrient Management Plan approved by the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), though this is not required for private universities. The plan is based on soil test and specific fertilization requirements set by the DCR based on the soil test. The Nutrient Management Plan does not require organic fertilizers, but does require that all nitrogen sources are 50% slow release. The plan is very strict in the use of phosphorus, which can be problematic when utilizing organic fertilizers as organic fertilizers contain phosphorus. If the soil test does not call for phosphorus, then it is very difficult to us an organic fertilizer. The existing 3 year plan expires the spring of 2016, a new plan will be prepared early in 2016, with the goal of utilizing organic fertilizers as soil test and guidelines set by the DCR allow.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.