Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 66.51
Liaison Aurora Sharrard
Submission Date Feb. 28, 2021

STARS v2.2

University of Pittsburgh
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
3.00 / 3.00 Jennifer Barnes
Supplier Diversity & Sustainability
Purchasing
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines, or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across multiple commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
---

The policies, guidelines or directives:

Pitt's general "Buying Green - Sustainable Purchasing" information can be found here: https://cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/buyingGreen.php

Our Commitment:
The University of Pittsburgh is committed to environmental stewardship through sustainable purchasing, conservation, and construction designed to conserve natural resources and preserve the environment. Our purchasing processes seek to balance the following objectives.
- Increase the purchase of products with a reduced or minimal environmental impact as compared to other similar products and services that serve the same purpose.
- Comply with regulations requiring sound financial stewardship by the University.
- Comply with regulations that require the University to identify business opportunities for diversity and disadvantaged suppliers.

Purchasing Services:
- Provides environmentally preferable supply sources through active research and solicitation of bids on environmentally preferable goods and services.
- Works with suppliers to ensure that environmentally preferable products are easy to locate through clear product labeling and use of the PantherExpress System. See our list of contracted supplier programs for more information.
- Asks suppliers to provide clear environmental impact information for the entire life cycle of products.
- Educates University departments about sustainable purchasing practices.
- Provides management services to University departments with product inventories to reduce the excess or obsolete inventories that lead to waste or potential environmental and safety issues.
- Provides a paperless purchase-to-pay process via the PantherExpress System.
- Purchasing Services also works closely with the Office of Sustainability to develop programs, provide outreach, or further support University sustainability initiatives.

General Guidelines for Sustainable Purchasing can be found here: https://cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/SusGuidlines.php


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA as a matter of policy and standard practice when evaluating all energy- and water-using products, systems and building components

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

The University of Pittsburgh is committed to purchasing products with a reduced or minimal environmental and energy demands as compared to other similar products and services that serve the same purpose. This includes general considerations that they are durable (long lasting, repairable, reusable, refillable, rechargeable), high quality, and function and better product life cycle costs to traditional products. The product or service consideration may consider impacts relating to raw materials acquisition, production, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, reuse, operation, maintenance , and/or disposal.

Language in this regard is included in all RFPs from Pitt Purchasing for external vendors. Contractors are asked to highlight reduced life cycle costs, reduced energy consumption, extended product life, decreased maintenance, and end-of-life plans (including recycling or reuse) of products (among a host of other sustainability and diversity considerations).

Additionally, internally, per the University’s Purchasing practices, purchases above $10,000 require collaboration with a Pitt Procurement Specialist, who helps ensure decisions consider all costs associated with the purchase, along with other sustainability and diversity considerations.

Specific to renovation and new construction projects, all facilities projects larger than $50,000 must have a Pitt Facilities Management project manager, who ensures that life cycle costing is incorporated into energy and water decision-making. All projects managed by FM must adhere to the University’s Design Manual, which Professionals use as a guide in the development and preparation of Contract Documents for construction and renovation projects assigned by Pitt’s Facilities Management. The Pitt FM Design Manual sets a high bar for building performance regardless – and also requires professionals to provide energy and life cycle costs with the ability to analyze energy and product alternatives (and to design facilities with low energy, maintenance, and operating costs with responsible considerations and paybacks if additional upfront cost is required).
Relatedly, when the University’s 30-year Energy Master Plan was completed in 2017, it lists LCCAs for all recommended energy and water conservation projects, which have been deployed over the past 3 years across campus, including in some buildings with the highest energy use intensities for both energy and water. Campus wide energy and water conservation measures (ECMs) are thus bundled based on LCCAs.

The University has also applied the social cost of carbon on a handful of facilities projects internally and is working on a more holistic application as part of the forthcoming Pitt Climate Action Plan.

Pitt’s Sustainable Landscape Design Guidelines also require the landscape architects to strive to design a cost-effective landscape that addresses life-cycle costs.

Pitt Facilities’ Design Manual: https://www.fm.pitt.edu/design-manual
Division S: Sustainable Landscape Design Guidelines: https://www.fm.pitt.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Design_Manual/DIVISION-S.pdf


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:

The 2018 Pitt Sustainability Plan commits the University to striving for sustainable consumption and diversion practices by considering sourcing, usage, and ultimate disposal at time of purchase; it also addresses cultivating sustainable landscapes that increase biodiversity and enrich all ecosystem services, which are vital to environmental and human health and well-being. 4 goals from both the “Materials & Waste” and “Landscape & Ecology” impact areas are of relevance to chemically intensive products and services:
1) Establish procedures, policies, practices, and educational tools to reduce the quantity and environmental impact of materials entering and exiting the University.
2) Use healthy products for our built environment in accordance with future Pitt Green Building Standards. Learn more.
3) Adhere to Pitt’s Sustainable Landscape Design Guidelines in all new landscape designs.
4) Maintain at least 75% of landscaped areas in accordance with Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) Standards for Organic Land Care by 2024.

In 2019, Pitt Facilities’ Management updated its Design Guidelines for Architectural Materials and Products, including the following healthy materials language applicable to all facilities projects:
a) The Professional and Contractor shall strive to use products that provide healthy indoor environments; this includes using products that avoid chemicals of concern as designated by Health Product Declarations (HPDs), Declare labels, and Cradle to Cradle (C2C) Material Health Certificates.
b) Use No or Low Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)-emitting Materials: Professional and Contractor shall strive to use low or no Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)-emitting materials (including paints, coatings, adhesives, carpet, ceiling tiles, and furniture systems) to help ensure good indoor air quality.
c) All site installed, wet applied products shall meet the VOC emissions limits of CARB 2007 and SCAQMD Rule 1168.
d) All interior products with the potential to emit shall be chamber tested and shown to meet the emissions thresholds of CDPH Standard Method v1.1-2010

Additionally, Pitt Purchasing provides other campus purchasers with cleaning and sanitizing product information and tips to help them make healthy choices: https://cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/cleaning.php

The University's Sustainable Landscape Design Guidelines work to reduce use of harmful chemicals, pesticides, and herbicides, including the following requirements:
• Strive to design landscapes that are easily maintained using the principles of sustainable landscape maintenance, such as NOFA (Northeast Organic Farm Associations of Connecticut) Standards for Land Care (http://www.nofamass.org).
• Compost for use as mulch and as topsoil amendment shall be weed-free, organic matter source derived from agricultural, leaf, or yard trimmings, non-toxic to humans or plants and free of man-madeforeign matter. Compost shall be certified by U.S. Composting Council’s Seal of Testing Assurance Program.
• Prohibit materials, including but not limited to: chemically treated wood and paper, dyed and chemically treated mulches, plastic and non-woven geotextile fabrics that contain PVC (polyvinyl chloride), synthetic burlaps, galvanized steel, mulch made from recycled rubber tires, synthetic fertilizer, synthetic pesticides and herbicides, sewage sludge, raw manure, triple superphosphate, muriate of potash, synthetically derived sulphates, calcium and magnesium, genetically modified seed.

Pitt’s Sustainable Landscape Design Guidelines: https://www.fm.pitt.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Design_Manual/DIVISION-S.pdf

Pitt Sustainability Plan goals: https://www.sustainable.pitt.edu/impacts


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating consumable office products?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for consumable office products:

The University of Pittsburgh has a wide variety of sustainability critera for consumable office products summarized below:

RESOURCES

• Pitt Purchasing’s Sustainable Purchasing for Ink & Toner Tools, Tips, and Resources: https://cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/toner_tools.php
• Pitt Purchasing’s Sustainable Purchasing for Lighting Products Tools, Tips and Resources:
https://cfo.pitt.edu/pExpress/documents/TTTLighting.pdf
• Pitt Purchasing Paper tools, tips, & resources: https://www.cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/paper.php
• Pitt Recycling information: https://www.sustainable.pitt.edu/zerowaste/
• Pitt Sustainability website: https://www.sustainable.pitt.edu
• + External references on Pitt Purchasing’s Paper page

TREE ZERO PAPER
TreeZero paper is made from 100% sugarcane waste fiber (not tree pulp), which means its price is not impacted by increases in the paper industry. TreeZero is 100% recyclable and carbon neutral, making it a smart solution for the environment as well as your budget. Many offices on campus have shifted over to TreeZero paper with no reported printer issues. TreeZero is offered for cheaper than virgin or recycled content paper in the SUPRA punchout in Pitt’s PantherExpress purchasing system.
Learn more: https://www.sustainable.pitt.edu/treezero-paper/

PAPER: TOOLS, TIPS, AND RESOURCES (provided for detail)

StopWaste.Org - StopWaste.Org is the Alameda County Waste Management Authority and the Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board operating as one public agency. StopWaste.org has a site dedicated to Environmental Purchasing Links, and a specific link for Green Paper products.
• Green Seal - Green Seal Certification ensures that a product meets rigorous, science-based leadership standards. This gives manufacturers the assurance to back up their claims and purchasers confidence that certified products are better for human health and the environment. Click here to find Green Seal GS-07 Printing-Writing Paper. Click here to find Green Seal GS-10 Coated Printing Paper.
• FSC - The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is an independent, non-governmental, not for profit organization established to promote the responsible management of the world’s forests. Click here to view FSC’s paper products standards:
• Conservatree - is a non-profit organization that provides web tools as well as in-depth information on environmentally sound papers. Click here to view a Paper Master List for Professional Paper Buyers, a Best Practices Manual for Single Stream Recycling as well as information to help assist in the selection of paper types.
• EPN - The Environmental Paper Network (EPN), a non-profit organization, provides specific tools for paper purchasers. Click here to view the Paper Calculator and other components of the Purchaser’s Toolkit.
• EPA - The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a governmental agency, has issued a series of web links designed to provide procurement professionals and consumers with web tools to help evaluate paper products. Click here for general information about paper products. Click here for EPA’s Buy-Recycled Series or visit the searchable supplier database to find suppliers that cell CPG designated products with recycled content.

PAPER PRODUCT TIPS
• Before printing, consider if it is absolutely necessary to print a particular file or document.
• For a large file, consider whether it is necessary to print the entire document.
• Before selecting the printer, choose the most energy efficient printer available in your area.
• Prior to printing, select the Properties tab on the Printer dialogue box and select 2-sided printing (which should also be your default).
• Consider whether it is absolutely necessary to have a document printed in color or will a black & white print meet your needs, especially for drafts.
• Chose the most sustainably efficient paper to meet your printing requirements (Carbon neutral, Acid Free, FSC Certified, 10%, 30% or 100% recycled content).
• Always recycle used paper as well as spent toners and cartridges.

Pitt Purchasing Paper Resources: https://www.cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/paper.php


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating furniture and furnishings?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for furniture and furnishings:

The University of Pittsburgh has a wide variety of sustainability criteria for furniture products, as summarized below:

Pitt Purchasing’s Sustainable Purchasing Resources for Office Furniture: found here: https://www.cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/OfficeFurniture.php
• Steelcase is a Gold level University contracted supplier, which has provided the following furniture purchasing tools, tips and resources to meet your department’s sustainability and budgetary goals (https://cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/documents/FranklinSteelcase.pdf); along with information on their product certifications (https://www.steelcase.com/resources/documents?tax[doctype]=certificates-sustainability); and product environmental profiles (https://www.steelcase.com/resources/documents/?tax%5Bdoctype%5D=product-environmental-profile )

PITT PURCHASING’S SUSTAINABLE PURCHASING RESOURCES FOR CARPETING:
Discover the importance of FloorScore certification and other tools by viewing the flooring Knowledge Center developed by Resilient Floor Covering Institute (RFCI).

Carpeting Tips:
- Discover ways to improve air quality and combat allergens on the Fact Sheet page developed by The Carpet and Rug Institute (CRI) on air quality, asthma and allergy management, cleaning products and environmental sustainability.
- Browse further resources developed by CRI "Committed to Sustainable Best Practices"
Learn more: https://cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/carpeting.php

PITT FACILITIES DESIGN GUIDELINES ON FURNITURE

The University’s Facilities Design Guidelines are followed for all projects over $50,000 (which are assigned a Pitt Facilities Project Manager). The sustainable furniture components are in Division C of those guidelines and summarized below.
Reference: https://www.fm.pitt.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Design_Manual/DiVISION_C_Divisions_02-14_Revised_20201210.docx.pdf

Product Requirements:
1) Regardless of the selected Sustainable Rating System, all materials and resources for every project shall meet the following goals:
a) Reduce consumption and depletion of material resources, especially nonrenewable resources.
b) Minimize the life-cycle impact of materials on the environment.
c) Enhance indoor environmental quality.
d) Minimize waste generated from construction, renovation, and demolition of buildings.
e) Encourage better management of and minimize waste generated during ongoing occupancy

2) Use Materials with Low Life-Cycle Cost: Use a life-cycle methodology to evaluate materials. Choose materials, especially those used in large quantities, with the lowest environmental impact when possible.
3) Explore use of Materials that provide reduced embodied carbon of primary materials compared to an equivalent baseline. Projects may select products with lower than industry average embodied carbon for the following product categories:
a) Ceiling tiles/acoustic treatments.
b) Flooring.
c) Gypsum wallboard.

4) Production: In order to conserve embodied energy, which is the total amount of energy needed to create a material from raw extraction to finished life of the product, and reduce the consumption of natural resources, consider the following:
a) Salvaged materials (e.g., reuse furniture, wood flooring, light fixtures, other building materials).
b) Remanufactured materials, such as engineered wood products.
c) Recycled-content products and materials (post-consumer is preferred over pre-consumer).
d) Reusable, recyclable, and biodegradable materials.
e) Materials from rapidly renewable sources (e.g., wheat, cotton, cork, bamboo, etc.).
f) Wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).

5) Use Locally Manufactured Materials: Obtain materials and products from local sources and manufacturers, minimizing energy use and pollution associated with transporting from great distances.
a) Regional Material: To the maximum extent feasible and practicable, materials and products (by cost) shall be manufactured in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is the University’s strong preference to begin with the closest local region first, and then move outward, and finally up to the 100 mile region beyond. 20% or more of the materials construction budget shall be from within 100 miles of the project site.

6) Use Durable Materials: Use products or materials (including masonry, steel, glass, and timber products such as beams, columns, floorboards, etc.) that are durable (with a life cycle of at least 50 years), weather well, and last more than one building lifetime (i.e., through a reuse or remodel).

7) Healthy Materials:
a) The Professional and Contractor shall strive to use products that provide healthy indoor environments; this includes using products that avoid chemicals of concern as designated by Health Product Declarations (HPDs), Declare labels, and Cradle to Cradle (C2C) Material Health Certificates.
b) Use No or Low Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)-emitting Materials: Professional and Contractor shall strive to use low or no Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)-emitting materials (including paints, coatings, adhesives, carpet, ceiling tiles, and furniture systems) to help ensure good indoor air quality.
c) All site installed, wet applied products shall meet the VOC emissions limits of CARB 2007 and SCAQMD Rule 1168.
d) All interior products with the potential to emit shall be chamber tested and shown to meet the emissions thresholds of CDPH Standard Method v1.1-2010.

DIVISION 120000 addresses the sustainability of furnishings in even greater detail: https://www.fm.pitt.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Design_Manual/DiVISION_C_Divisions_02-14_Revised_20201210.docx.pdf


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) and equipment?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for Information Technology (IT) and equipment:

Pitt Information Technology’s Computer Purchasing and Standardization Program enables University academic and administrative units to purchase pre-configured devices for use by their staff and faculty at significant cost savings. When it’s time to purchase a new PC, either Pitt IT or Purchasing can support employees in buying the appropriate standard device through PantherExpress. All standard devices have ENERGY STAR certification.
Learn more: https://www.technology.pitt.edu/services/computer-purchasing-staff-faculty

Pitt Purchasing also has a number of Sustainable Purchasing Resources specific to Computer Products for internal purchasers. The University also encourages external vendors and internal purchasers to focus on EPEAT and ENERGY STAR certification when available in a product category:

Computer Product Tools:

• EPEAT - (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool): EPEAT was launched in July 2006 by the EPA and helps institutional purchasers evaluate and select laptops, desktop computers, and monitors according to a list of preferred environmental attributes.
• CoSN's - web-based Energy Usage Calculator: This Calculator provides a quick approach for estimating annual kilowatt hours and related cost for computer use by K-12 users (by group) and the related datacenter infrastructure.
• ENERGY STAR - Energy Star is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy, has published guides and calculators to help determine equipment life cycle and savings including carbon IT savings.
• ETBC (Electronics TakeBack Coalition) - ETBC promotes green design and responsible recycling in the electronics industry. ETBC's goal is to protect the health and wellbeing of electronics users, workers, and the communities where electronics are produced and discarded by requiring consumer electronics manufacturers and brand owners to take full responsibility for the life cycle of their products.
• RPN (The Responsible Purchasing Network) - RPN is an international network of buyers dedicated to socially responsible and environmentally sustainable purchasing. RPN has published several useful calculators to determine environmental benefits, life cycle estimates, and carbon reduction.

Computer Product Tips

• If possible, use a laptop instead of a desktop computer. On average, with each computer being used for the same task and duration, desktop computers use about 150 watts of power compared to a mere 25 watts that laptops consume.
• Laptops have fewer add-on peripherals, (display screens & keyboards) and components, making them easier to recycle and contributing fewer chemicals such as PVC’s and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) to post-consumer waste landfills.
• When possible, power down your computer at night or when not in use.
• Use ‘green’ power strips to power your computer, peripherals and printers.
• When purchasing a new computer, evaluate the manufacturer regarding its sustainability and social responsibility activities. Use resources such as the Basel Action Network to investigate a manufacturer’s track record as to its recycling efforts.

Learn more: https://cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/computers.php


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food service providers:

The 2018 Pitt Sustainability Plan set a number of “Food Systems” and “Materials & Waste” goals related to Dining at the University. The vision for is that the University will help "build food systems that support a healthy body and healthy planet, strengthen local communities, and minimize waste," while also striving for “sustainable consumption and diversion practices by considering sourcing, usage, and ultimate disposal at time of purchase.” The Pitt Sustainability Plan serves as a strategic road map for our sustainability efforts and builds on our longstanding commitment to the University community.

In 2018, the goals below were committed to partnership with the University’s past food vendor (Sodexo). They are also written into the new 10-year contract with new food services contractor, Compass Group, which began serving the university in Summer 2020. Along with the goals below, Pitt Eats by Compass Group is committed to 15% diverse purchasing and supporting the University in achieving its energy and water reduction goals.

• Support a local, fair, ecologically sound, and humane food system by expanding the Real - Food Challenge across campus to serve 25% Real Food by 2025.
• Serve 50% of to-go meals and beverages in reusable containers by 2025.
• Serve meals that put plants at the center of the plate by decreasing the amount of animal-derived products old by 25% by 2025 (Cool Food Pledge of 25% reduction in GHGs by 2025)
• Compost 50% of food waste by 2025.
• Reduce landfill waste by 25% by 2030 from 2017 levels.
• Establish procedures, policies, practices, and educational tools to reduce the quantity and environmental impact of materials entering and exiting the University.

Learn more about sustainability in Pitt’s on-campus dining and food offerings here: https://dineoncampus.com/pitt/sustainable-practices and here: https://www.sustainable.pitt.edu/learn-more/pitt-green-guide/green-guide-food-dining/

Pitt’s Real Food and Cool Food details are documented in Credit OP-7. Dining’s contributions to waste on campus is evidenced in our growing food recovery and composting numbers showcased in Credit OP-18 and our online Pitt Sustainability Dashboard here: https://www.sustainable.pitt.edu/dashboard/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional service providers:

Pitt’s Facilities Management Professional Design Manual has two whole sections on the sustainability expectations for external service providers (pieces of each are quoted below, but they’re available in full at the link):
• Section 018100 Project Performance Requirements - Sustainability Design
• Section 018113 Sustainability Design Requirements

Pitt’s Design Manual: https://www.fm.pitt.edu/design-manual
Pitt’s Design Manual, Division C for Architectural Design Guidelines for Sustainability, Products, and Materials: https://www.fm.pitt.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Design_Manual/DiVISION_C_Divisions_02-14_Revised_20201210.docx.pdf

“The University of Pittsburgh Project Design Sustainability Guidelines apply to all capital projects and are included in all Requests for Proposals issued for projects and referenced in contracts for professionals and construction managers.”

“The sustainability goals identified in the Request for Proposal identify the minimum level of design and process requirements for construction and renovation projects. At the beginning of the project, the Professional and the University’s Project Manager shall review the project scope, confirming the type of project, project estimated cost and the appropriate sustainability rating systems to apply. At minimum, the project will incorporate the sustainability goals outlined in the Request for Proposal and Owners Project Requirements (OPR). The Professional shall evaluate the feasibility of pursuing a higher level and/or complementary sustainability goals prior to meeting with the University’s Project Manager including understanding anticipated life cycle costs, benefits, and/or savings that may be incurred in order to create a more sustainable project. The University is very interested in identifying economies of scale that may exceed the project scale; to that end, Professional shall work with Project Manager to understand campus and city systems before suggesting a solution."

“University will also set whole project site Energy Use Intensity (EUI in kBTU/square foot/year) and Water Use Intensity (WUI in gallons/square foot). EUI and WUI targets for the different types of spaces anticipated to be part of the project will be identified; final whole project site EUI and WUI targets will be determined based on weighted average of the final areas of each space type. Campus-wide site EUI and WUI targets align with the ideals and goals of the international 2030 Challenge”

“Tier 1 and Tier 2 projects shall consider a third party Green Building Rating System or Certification. The Professional shall evaluate the following Sustainability Rating Systems and Certifications, and demonstrate to the University whether they are viable options:
a) LEED.
b) Passive House.
c) WELL.
d) Fitwel.
e) Zero Energy.
f) Zero Carbon.
g) Living Building Challenge.
h) ParkSmart.
i) Other internationally relevant third-party sustainability rating systems to be determined.”

“To ensure that the University’s Project Sustainability Design Guidelines are accomplished the Professional shall provide appropriate documents at the end of each phase of the design process to prove that the project design supports the University’s sustainability goals, conforms to the requirements of the Sustainability Rating System and fully meets the University’s Sustainability Certification requirements as outlined in the Request for Proposals or as otherwise agreed upon.

Professional shall prepare sustainability documentation in the Contract Documents that provides direction to the Contractor to achieve the required Sustainability Certification.

Professional shall have on staff or hire a consultant with a professional Sustainability Credential applicable to the Certification(s) being pursued.”

“Professional shall …include general requirements and procedures for Construction Phase Sustainability Submittals, for compliance with the selected sustainability guidelines as stated in the Request for Proposals and amended during the Design Development Phase.

Sustainability Project Checklist: Section shall include checklist addressing all credits project might pursue under selected Sustainability Rating System(s).

Professional shall include language that all submittals and transmissions to the Sustainability Rating System shall be copied to University’s Project Manager. At the end of the project, the Professional shall add designated University personnel to online submission portal for the project and deliver to University’s Project Manager on electronic media, all documentation for Sustainability Certification and correspondence with the Sustainability Rating System.”

“Close-Out Documentation:

1. Contractor shall collect and turn over documentation that shall assist with efficient operations of the space or shall be beneficial to the performance of future University projects. This process should be done in a consistent and thorough process and includes the following requirements:
a) Contractor shall prepare and turn over to the Facilities Department a Systems Manual following the requirements of ASHRAE Guideline. This is frequently delivered as part of the project’s commissioning (Cx) efforts.
b) Official acceptance of O&M documentation must be approved by University’s Project Manager.
c) Contractor shall submit documentation required by University’s Project Manager, including as-built energy model with summary of inputs and outputs and electronic model file.
d) Provide electronic access to the selected Sustainability Rating Systems’ online account and content to University’s Project Manager for university tracking purposes.
e) Provide a final copy of the project’s Deliverables and associated documentation to University’s Project Manager.”


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:

The University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Parking, Transportation & Services (PT&S) is committed to practicing efficient fleet purchasing as a means to:
• Reduce fossil fuel dependence of our operations
• Reduce lifecycle environmental and fleet costs
• Increase the availability of alternative fuel vehicles
• Promote the advancement of innovative technologies
• Lower greenhouse gas emissions, helping to mitigate climate change and improve air quality
• Support emissions reductions goals outlined in the University Sustainability Plan.

See attached additional documentation for full 2018 Vehicle Purchasing Guidelines, along with the September 2020 announcement of Pitt’s extended partnership with Enterprise. The partnership will help Pitt upgrade its fleet with more hybrid and electric vehicles, which will further support the University’s commitment to making the campus carbon neutral by 2037. “Enterprise Fleet Management will lease a total of 268 electric and hybrid vehicles to Pitt, beginning with 32 new vehicles to the facilities department, faculty and staff” in 2020, with double that expected annually moving forward.

Learn more: https://www.pittwire.pitt.edu/news/university-extends-partnership-enterprise-support-transportation-needs-sustainability-goals


Website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable procurement program or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

+ Pitt Purchasing General Sustainability Guidelines: http://cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/buyingGreen.php
+ Pitt Purchasing General Paper Sustainability Guidelines: http://www.cfo.pitt.edu/pexpress/purchases/paper.php
+ Pitt Purchasing General Sustainability Guidelines:
+ Pitt Facilities Design Manual: https://www.fm.pitt.edu/design-manual
+ Pitt Facilities Design Manual, Division C (Architectural for Sustainability, Products, and Materials): https://www.fm.pitt.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Design_Manual/DiVISION_C_Divisions_02-14_Revised_20201210.docx.pdf
+ Pitt Facilities Design Manual, Division S, Sustainable Landscapes: http://fm.pitt.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Design_Manual/DIVISION-S.pdf
https://dineoncampus.com/pitt/procurement

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.