Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 66.51
Liaison Aurora Sharrard
Submission Date Feb. 28, 2021

STARS v2.2

University of Pittsburgh
OP-5: Building Energy Efficiency

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.20 / 6.00 Michael Sinack
Senior Manager, Mechanical Engineering
Facilities Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Electricity use, performance year (report kilowatt-hours):
kWh MMBtu
Imported electricity 233,909,000 Kilowatt-hours 798,097.51 MMBtu
Electricity from on-site, non-combustion facilities/devices (e.g., renewable energy systems) 4,311 Kilowatt-hours 14.71 MMBtu

Stationary fuels and thermal energy, performance year (report MMBtu):
MMBtu
Stationary fuels used on-site to generate electricity and/or thermal energy 833,624 MMBtu
Imported steam, hot water, and/or chilled water 121,755 MMBtu

Total site energy consumption, performance year:
1,753,491.22 MMBtu

Gross floor area of building space, performance year:
11,564,322 Gross Square Feet

Floor area of energy intensive space, performance year:
Floor area
Laboratory space 2,414,722 Square Feet
Healthcare space 0 Square Feet
Other energy intensive space 648,676 Square Feet

EUI-adjusted floor area, performance year:
17,042,442 Gross Square Feet

Degree days, performance year:
Degree days
Heating degree days 5,446 Degree-Days (°F)
Cooling degree days 975 Degree-Days (°F)

Total degree days, performance year:
6,421 Degree-Days (°F)

Start and end dates of the performance year (or 3-year period):
Start date End date
Performance period July 1, 2017 June 30, 2020

Total site energy consumption per unit of EUI-adjusted floor area per degree day, performance year:
16.02 Btu / GSF / Degree-Day (°F)

Electricity use, baseline year (report kWh):
kWh MMBtu
Imported electricity 211,102,000 Kilowatt-hours 720,280.02 MMBtu
Electricity from on-site, non-combustion facilities/devices (e.g., renewable energy systems) 0 Kilowatt-hours 0 MMBtu

Stationary fuels and thermal energy, baseline year (report MMBtu):
MMBtu
Stationary fuels used on-site to generate electricity and/or thermal energy 104,555 MMBtu
Imported steam, hot water, and/or chilled water 828,013 MMBtu

Total site energy consumption, baseline year:
1,652,848.02 MMBtu

Gross floor area of building space, baseline year:
9,447,142 Gross Square Feet

Start and end dates of the baseline year (or 3-year period):
Start date End date
Baseline period July 1, 2010 June 30, 2011

A brief description of when and why the energy consumption baseline was adopted:

Fiscal Year 2011 has been selected as the baseline for submission. This was the time period of focus for the University's SECOND Greenhouse Gas inventory, but has been selected as a baseline year because the data set is more accurate than that used for the 2008 GHG baseline inventory for the University's entire GHG footprint.


Source-site ratio for imported electricity:
3.14

Total energy consumption per unit of floor area:
Site energy Source energy
Performance year 0.15 MMBtu / GSF 0.30 MMBtu / GSF
Baseline year 0.17 MMBtu / GSF 0.34 MMBtu / GSF

Percentage reduction in total source energy consumption per unit of floor area from baseline:
11.47

Documentation to support the performance year energy consumption figures reported above:
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A brief description of the institution's initiatives to shift individual attitudes and practices in regard to energy efficiency:

The Pitt Sustainability Plan was finalized in January 2018 with the full endorsement of the Chancellor and University. The Plan sets out several goals in the "Energy & Emissions" impact area, as listed below:

To combat the serious threat of climate change, we aim to dramatically reduce energy consumption and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Goals and Aspirations

* Reach carbon neutrality by 2037 for Pittsburgh campus (Added in February 2020)
* Strive toward climate neutrality, with a goal to reduce GHG emissions by 50% by 2030 from 2008 baseline. Follow our progress.
* Embrace Pittsburgh 2030 District goals of 50% reduction below the national average in energy use intensity (consumption per square foot) by 2030 (from 2003 baseline) and establish design standards and operational practices to achieve them.
* Produce or procure 50% of the University’s electricity from renewable resources by 2030.

Learn more: https://www.sustainable.pitt.edu/impacts/energy-emissions/


A brief description of energy use standards and controls employed by the institution:

Though they were publicized in the 2018 Pitt Sustainability Plan, the University of Pittsburgh has been committed to international 2030 Challenge goals related to energy since 2014. Specifically, the goal is to achieve 50% reduction in energy use intensity (EUI, energy consumption in kBTU per square foot) by 2030 (below national baselines) -- and establish design standards and operational practices to achieve them.

In Fiscal Year 2020, Pitt’s continued emphasis on reducing energy consumption resulted in a sustained downward trend, with the University reaching its lowest total energy use per square foot since data tracking began in 2008 (and remaining on track to meet the 2030 goal of 50% reduction). To achieve these reductions, Pitt’s Facilities Management initiated and completed energy reduction measures across campus buildings, resulting in a 22% reduction since 2015. Key initiatives included Facilities Management’s “Relamping for Sustainability” program that focused on LED lighting upgrades which was completed in 12 buildings, anticipating savings of over $206,000 per year with additional LED lighting upgrades over time, and use of the University’s Fault Detection and Diagnostics Analytics system with documented energy savings of over $112,000 per year.

NEW CONSTRUCTION & MAJOR RENOVATIONS

Pitt’s energy use tracking across campus and by building includes both existing buildings, new buildings, and major renovations. All energy projects are covered by Facilities' Design Manual, including Division J (Mechanical) and Division K (Electrical): https://www.fm.pitt.edu/design-manual

Additionally, all Pitt new construction and major renovation projects have EUI targets set at the very beginning that align with the University’s 2030 Challenge targets.

INDOOR AIR TEMPERATURE SETPOINTS

The University's standard indoor air temperature setpoints are as follows:

Winter Indoor Air Dry Bulb Temperature

* All occupied spaces: 70º F ± 2º F with nighttime and weekend setbacks to 60º F
* Labs housing and caring for animals: As required by the current edition of “Guide for Care and Use of Laboratory Animals.”
* Unoccupied spaces (such as storage rooms, vestibules, etc.): 55ºF ± 5º F
* Unoccupied spaces (such as mechanical equipment rooms, electrical equipment rooms, etc.): 55ºF minimum.
* Unoccupied spaces (such as toilet rooms): 68º F ± 2º F.
* Elevator equipment rooms: 40°F minimum and 90º F maximum.

Summer Indoor Air Dry Bulb and Wet Bulb(WB) Temperatures

• All occupied spaces: 74º F ± 2º F with maximum 57º F WB with nighttime and weekend setbacks to 80º F
• Labs housing and caring for animals: As required by the current edition of “Guide for Care and Use of Laboratory Animals.”
• Unoccupied spaces (such as storage rooms, vestibules, etc.): 80ºF ± 5º F with maximum 62º F WB.
• Unoccupied spaces (such as mechanical equipment rooms, electrical equipment rooms, etc.): 90ºF maximum, non-condensing conditions at all times.
• Unoccupied spaces (such as toilet rooms): 78º F ± 2º F with maximum 57º F WB.
• Elevator equipment rooms: 40°F minimum and 90º F maximum, non-condensing conditions at all times.

LIGHTING CONTROLS

University lighting control standards require:
• Vacancy sensors to be used to control lighting in all spaces where occupants may want lights off when occupied (e.g., offices, classrooms, and labs);
• Occupancy sensors in all spaces where lights must be on when occupied (e.g., restrooms and corridors);
• Photocells or time clocks to control all outdoor lighting; and
• Even emergency lighting is required to be automatically shut off when spaces are unoccupied (generator transfer devices are used to automatically turn emergency lights on when normal power is lost).


A brief description of Light Emitting Diode (LED) lighting and other energy-efficient lighting strategies employed by the institution:

In addition to its normal annual energy and water conservation and efficiency projects, the University has contracted with The Efficiency Network (TEN) to advance more energy and water upgrades since 2018. TEN has audited over 15 campus buildings to-date -- and has been advancing energy efficiency upgrades across the 15 buildings since 2018, with more buildings in the queue. This effort is part of a multi-year Pitt Facilities Management energy efficiency upgrade project that includes LED lighting.

In fiscal year 2020 alone, Facilities Management’s “Relamping for Sustainability” program was completed in 12 buildings, anticipating savings of over $206,000 per year with additional LED lighting upgrades over time.

The University’s lighting standards are covered in detail in Facilities' Design Manual, Division K (Electrical): https://www.fm.pitt.edu/design-manual


A brief description of passive solar heating, geothermal systems, and related strategies employed by the institution:

Given Pitt's performance-based approach to building energy use, a variety of strategies are used in new construction, including passive solar design when possible.

The University does not currently have any geothermal systems on-campus.


A brief description of co-generation employed by the institution:

Neither of the district steam plants cooperatively owned by Pitt are currently co-generation facilities.

However, in 2020 the University of Pittsburgh was the recipient of a $2,600 Second Nature Climate Solutions Acceleration Fund grant that has been supporting energy modeling at the district level for Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood (including district steam). The grant and Pitt are supporting the City of Pittsburgh’s Department of City Planning in development of an Oakland Energy Master Plan that will help the city and its universities reach their carbon reduction goals.
Learn more: https://www.pittwire.pitt.edu/accolades/climate-solutions-grant-will-aid-oakland-energy-master-plan


A brief description of the institution's initiatives to replace energy-consuming appliances, equipment, and systems with high efficiency alternatives:

The University of Pittsburgh's 2017 Energy Master Plan and Energy Conservation Plan identified Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) across the University, which began shortly thereafter and will continue on. Thus, in addition to its normal annual energy and water conservation and efficiency projects, the University has contracted with The Efficiency Network (TEN) to advance more energy and water upgrades since 2018. TEN has audited over 15 campus buildings to-date -- and has been advancing energy efficiency upgrades across 25 buildings since 2018, with more buildings in the queue. This effort includes systems, equipment, and appliance upgrades.

As part of the in-development Pitt Climate Action Plan, additional efficiency opportunities are being identified and deployed campus-wide.


Website URL where information about the institution’s energy conservation and efficiency program is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.