Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 66.40
Liaison Madeline Schuh
Submission Date Feb. 21, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Pennsylvania
PA-7: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.74 / 4.00 Madeline Schuh
Sustainability Analyst
Facilities and Real Estate Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

Penn practices need-blind admissions for citizens and permanent residents of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, which means that admissions decisions are not affected by a family’s ability to pay. Penn commits to meeting full demonstrated need for four years and provides loan-free packages for eight academic semesters. If a family’s circumstances remain stable, financial aid remains relatively constant; if circumstances change during the year (such as a parent losing a job), a financial aid package will be adjusted. As all scholarships are need-based, students must complete the financial aid process. Student Financial Services selects recipients based on the scholarship's criteria; no separate application is necessary. These scholarships are provided through direct gifts to the University and privately endowed funds established by alumni and friends. Named scholarships enable Penn to continue its two-fold commitment to admit students solely on the basis of academic merit, and to meet 100% of a student's financial need.

The cornerstone of Penn’s initiative to increase access for students from all socioeconomic backgrounds is its All-Grant Financial Aid Policy. Penn has awarded nearly $1 billion in grants since implementing the policy in 2008, and the average net cost for aided students to attend Penn today is almost $2,700 less than it was in 2005 (in constant 2005 dollars). In 2016-17, this need-based grant program made it possible for nearly half of Penn’s undergraduate students to attend and graduate from the University without incurring debt.


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs to promote equity and diversity among students, staff, and faculty.

Penn's Office of Affirmative Action & Equal Opportunities Programs (OAA/EOP) provides central leadership and support for the University’s efforts to achieve an educational and work environment that is diverse in race, ethnicity, interests, abilities and perspectives, as well as educational training programs to assist members of the University community in understanding discrimination, harassment and retaliation. The office ensures the implementation of equal opportunity, affirmative action and nondiscrimination policies through education, training and active partnership with others from the campus and the broader Philadelphia communities. In addition, this office offers information on how to address behaviors that violate University policies, and how to be proactive in creating a respectful and productive work environment. See: http://www.upenn.edu/affirm-action/policies-handbooks.html

The Office provides educational programs on Penn’s Affirmative Action and non-discrimination policies, as well as specific topics related to affirmative action, non-discrimination, equal opportunity, diversity, disability, sex discrimination and other forms of prohibited discrimination, specifically to provide educational programs tailored to department-specific issues, and to provide technical assistance to University personnel on affirmative action and non-discrimination issues.

The services of the office include, but are not limited to, the following: investigate complaints of harassment and other forms of prohibited discrimination; provide training on affirmative action, equal opportunity and non-discrimination policies; offer suggestions on outreach and recruitment strategies, consult with faculty and staff with disabilities on request for reasonable accommodation, as well as consulting with managers and supervisors who need information on how to provide reasonable accommodation to employees with disabilities.

These services are available for all University and related faculty, staff, students, and collective bargaining staff.

Examples of the training programs offered by OAA/EOP include the following:
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers
Americans with Disabilities (ADA) for Faculty
Creating a Respectful and Productive Work Environment
Common Ground: Promoting Respectful Workplaces
Diversity for Leaders
Diversity Management: Valuing Diversity at Penn
Managing Intercultural Conflict
Procedures for Resolving Complaints of Discrimination
Sexual Harassment Awareness
Whites Confronting Racism

In addition to these offices, in 2017, the University launched a program for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students to support these underrepresented groups while at Penn and to recruit FGLI students to Penn. Of the incoming freshman class, 12.4% are first generation college students (http://www.admissions.upenn.edu/apply/whatpennlooksfor/incoming-class-profile). For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/fgli


A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs to promote equity and diversity among students, staff, and faculty.

In 2017, the University launched a program for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students to support these underrepresented groups while at Penn and to recruit FGLI students to Penn. Of the incoming freshman class, 12.4% are first generation college students (http://www.admissions.upenn.edu/apply/whatpennlooksfor/incoming-class-profile). For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/fgli

The Vice Provost for University Life's (VPUL) Equity and Access Programs nurture the academic aspirations of hundreds of local community members each year, from middle school through graduate study. Youth-based programs such as Talent Search, Upward Bound, and Upward Bound Math Science help to guide promising local middle and high school students toward college. Adult-based programs, including the Educational Opportunity Center and Veterans Upward Bound, assist adult community members seeking to return to education or extend their current educational experiences. These support services help students enhance learning in core academic subjects, manage time, find financial aid, meet mentors, and feel more confident about their abilities. Penn’s Equity and Access Programs provide community members a pipeline of opportunities for educational success.

The Provost Summer Mentorship Program (SMP) is an innovative four-week program geared to inspire first generation underrepresented students in Philadelphia to view higher education as an achievable goal. Students attending this program have the opportunity to participate in five of Penn's professional schools (Dental Medicine, Nursing, Engineering, Medicine, and Law). Over the course of the program, high school students gain first hand exposure to an academic discipline and the opportunity to explore a variety of career opportunities. Since 2009, 255 SMP alumni (STEMMP included) out of 276 SMP alumni are either currently enrolled at or have graduated from a post-secondary institution. Since 2009, 21 total SMP alumni (STEMMP included) are either currently enrolled at or have graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. More information on the program can be found here: https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/eap/smp/


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

Penn practices need-blind admissions for citizens and permanent residents of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, which means admissions decisions are not affected by a family’s ability to pay. Penn commits to meeting full demonstrated need for four years and provides loan-free packages for eight academic semesters. If a family’s circumstances remain stable, financial aid remains relatively constant; if circumstances change during the year (such as a parent losing a job), a financial aid package will be adjusted. As all scholarships are need-based, students must complete the financial aid process. Student Financial Services selects recipients based on the scholarship's criteria; no separate application is necessary. These scholarships are provided through direct gifts to the University and privately endowed funds established by alumni and friends. Named scholarships enable Penn to continue its two-fold commitment to admit students solely on the basis of academic merit, and to meet 100% of a student's financial need.

The cornerstone of Penn’s initiative to increase access for students from all socioeconomic backgrounds is its All-Grant Financial Aid Policy. Penn has awarded nearly $1 billion in grants since implementing the policy in 2008, and the average net cost for aided students to attend Penn today is almost $2,700 less than it was in 2005 (in constant 2005 dollars). In 2016-17, this need-based grant program made it possible for nearly half of Penn’s undergraduate students to attend and graduate from the University without incurring debt.


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

University President, Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020 goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs that provide mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs to support students from underrepresented groups on campus.In addition, Penn's Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence outlines an extensive plan to recruit, retain, and mentor distinguished and diverse faculty http://provost.upenn.edu/uploads/media_items/diversity-plan-brochure.original.pdf.

The University of Pennsylvania's Talent Search Program is a federally-funded TRIO Program designed to help eligible students complete high school and enroll in post-secondary school. The Program provides 600 students at West Philadelphia's Beeber Middle School and Overbrook High School with support services that instill within them a college-going culture and promote the academic and personal development necessary for entry into higher education institutions.
The Talent Search Program offers a full range of activities and interventions to reduce the gap in college access, including goal setting and decision making; career exploration and academic planning; college selection and scholarship searches; and financial aid information. Students also gain exposure to college life by visiting colleges and universities. Middle school students receive instruction that includes academic counseling and advising; educational workshops; and career exploration activities. High school students receive group and individual advising; assistance with researching colleges; and assistance with completing college, financial aid, and scholarship applications.

McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program: The University of Pennsylvania is proud to be the first Ivy League institution to host the prestigious Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program. This project, also known as the McNair Scholars Program and named in honor of deceased NASA astronaut Dr. Ronald E. McNair, identifies and prepares eligible students for graduate studies leading to the Ph.D. by providing research training and early scholarly experiences to high-achieving undergraduate Penn students. Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs to promote equity and diversity among students, staff, and faculty.

The University of Pennsylvania's Talent Search Program is a federally funded TRIO Program designed to help eligible students complete high school and enroll in postsecondary school. The Program provides 600 students at West Philadelphia’s Beeber Middle School and Overbrook High School with support services that instill within them a college-going culture and promote the academic and personal development necessary for entry into higher education institutions.

The Talent Search Program offers a full range of activities and interventions to reduce the gap in college access, including goal setting and decision making; career exploration and academic planning; college selection and scholarship searches; and financial aid information. Students also gain exposure to college life by visiting colleges and universities. Middle school students receive instruction that includes academic counseling and advising; educational workshops; and career exploration activities. High school students receive group and individual advising; assistance with researching colleges; and assistance with completing college, financial aid, and scholarship applications.

McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program: The University of Pennsylvania is proud to be the first Ivy League institution to host the prestigious Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program. This project, also known as the McNair Scholars Program and named in honor of deceased NASA astronaut Dr. Ronald E. McNair, identifies and prepares eligible students for graduate studies leading to the Ph.D. by providing research training and early scholarly experiences to high-achieving undergraduate Penn students. Students apply to the McNair Scholars Program during their sophomore year. The program comprises four modules: the Summer Research Institute, the Junior Academic Year Activities, a Summer Internship, and the Senior Year Graduate School Preparatory. McNair Scholars participate in research training and scholarly experiences through each of the four modules, as well as through other related activities, including performing research under the guidance of a faculty mentor, presenting their research at national academic conferences, and publishing their work in the Penn McNair Research Journal.

Penn's College Achievement Program (PennCAP) works closely with a diverse group of academically talented students, many from low-income and/or first-generation backgrounds, to support their success at Penn. Staff provide coaching, counseling, academic assistance, and cultural enrichment so that students can more confidently move towards their personal and academic goals. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/eap/penncap/

The University of Pennsylvania High School Upward Bound Program is a college preparatory program designed to motivate and prepare students in the program for the successful pursuit of a four-year college education. The goal of the program is to increase the rate at which low-income, first-generation-to-college students enroll in and graduate from a college or university with a bachelor's degree. The mission of the program is to provide high school students in grades 9th – 12th, at the identified high schools, with academic, career and cultural enrichment resources and programming to assist students to graduate from high school and increase the rate at which low income, first generation college students matriculate and graduate from post secondary institutions. Only students from Lamberton, Motivation, Overbrook, Parkway West, Sayre, Strawberry Mansion, and West Philadelphia public high schools are eligible to apply.

Upward Bound Math Science works to help low-income and first-generation-to-college high school students recognize and develop their potential to excel in fields related to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Upward Bound Math and Science program services include: summer programs with intensive math, science, writing and language training; year-round counseling, advisement and academic support services; exposure to research; education or counseling services designed to improve the financial and economic literacy of students; and assistance with application to competitive post-secondary institutions leading to bachelor's degree in a STEM related discipline. Students from University City High and Overbrook High are eligible to apply.

The TRIO Veterans Upward Bound (VUB) Program at the University of Pennsylvania is a FREE, non-credited, non-profit, pre-college program federally funded with a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The primary goal of TRIO VUB is to prepare eligible veterans to enter college, be successful in college, and to graduate from college. In order for students to be fully prepared for college, TRIO VUB emulates the college experience. High expectations are placed on students while attending TRIO VUB in order to support their success in the Program and later in college. TRIO VUB provides 160 students annually with academic instruction and support services. Students come to TRIO VUB from Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties in Pennsylvania and Camden County in New Jersey.

In 2017, the University launched a program for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students to support these underrepresented groups while at Penn and to recruit FGLI students to Penn. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/fgli


A brief description of the institution’s other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

University President, Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020 goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs that provide mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs to support students from underrepresented groups on campus.In addition, Penn's Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence outlines an extensive plan to recruit, retain, and mentor distinguished and diverse faculty http://provost.upenn.edu/uploads/media_items/diversity-plan-brochure.original.pdf.

The University of Pennsylvania's Talent Search Program is a federally-funded TRIO Program designed to help eligible students complete high school and enroll in post-secondary school. The Program provides 600 students at West Philadelphia's Beeber Middle School and Overbrook High School with support services that instill within them a college-going culture and promote the academic and personal development necessary for entry into higher education institutions.
The Talent Search Program offers a full range of activities and interventions to reduce the gap in college access, including goal setting and decision making; career exploration and academic planning; college selection and scholarship searches; and financial aid information. Students also gain exposure to college life by visiting colleges and universities. Middle school students receive instruction that includes academic counseling and advising; educational workshops; and career exploration activities. High school students receive group and individual advising; assistance with researching colleges; and assistance with completing college, financial aid, and scholarship applications.

McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program: The University of Pennsylvania is proud to be the first Ivy League institution to host the prestigious Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program. This project, also known as the McNair Scholars Program and named in honor of deceased NASA astronaut Dr. Ronald E. McNair, identifies and prepares eligible students for graduate studies leading to the Ph.D. by providing research training and early scholarly experiences to high-achieving undergraduate Penn students. Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs to promote equity and diversity among students, staff, and faculty.

The University of Pennsylvania's Talent Search Program is a federally funded TRIO Program designed to help eligible students complete high school and enroll in postsecondary school. The Program provides 600 students at West Philadelphia’s Beeber Middle School and Overbrook High School with support services that instill within them a college-going culture and promote the academic and personal development necessary for entry into higher education institutions.

The Talent Search Program offers a full range of activities and interventions to reduce the gap in college access, including goal setting and decision making; career exploration and academic planning; college selection and scholarship searches; and financial aid information. Students also gain exposure to college life by visiting colleges and universities. Middle school students receive instruction that includes academic counseling and advising; educational workshops; and career exploration activities. High school students receive group and individual advising; assistance with researching colleges; and assistance with completing college, financial aid, and scholarship applications.

McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program: The University of Pennsylvania is proud to be the first Ivy League institution to host the prestigious Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program. This project, also known as the McNair Scholars Program and named in honor of deceased NASA astronaut Dr. Ronald E. McNair, identifies and prepares eligible students for graduate studies leading to the Ph.D. by providing research training and early scholarly experiences to high-achieving undergraduate Penn students. Students apply to the McNair Scholars Program during their sophomore year. The program comprises four modules: the Summer Research Institute, the Junior Academic Year Activities, a Summer Internship, and the Senior Year Graduate School Preparatory. McNair Scholars participate in research training and scholarly experiences through each of the four modules, as well as through other related activities, including performing research under the guidance of a faculty mentor, presenting their research at national academic conferences, and publishing their work in the Penn McNair Research Journal.

Penn's College Achievement Program (PennCAP) works closely with a diverse group of academically talented students, many from low-income and/or first-generation backgrounds, to support their success at Penn. Staff provide coaching, counseling, academic assistance, and cultural enrichment so that students can more confidently move towards their personal and academic goals. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/eap/penncap/

The University of Pennsylvania High School Upward Bound Program is a college preparatory program designed to motivate and prepare students in the program for the successful pursuit of a four-year college education. The goal of the program is to increase the rate at which low-income, first-generation-to-college students enroll in and graduate from a college or university with a bachelor's degree. The mission of the program is to provide high school students in grades 9th – 12th, at the identified high schools, with academic, career and cultural enrichment resources and programming to assist students to graduate from high school and increase the rate at which low income, first generation college students matriculate and graduate from post secondary institutions. Only students from Lamberton, Motivation, Overbrook, Parkway - West, Sayre, Strawberry Mansion, and West Philadelphia public high schools are eligible to apply.

Upward Bound Math Science works to help low-income and first-generation-to-college high school students recognize and develop their potential to excel in fields related to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Upward Bound Math and Science program services include: summer programs with intensive math, science, writing and language training; year-round counseling, advisement and academic support services; exposure to research; education or counseling services designed to improve the financial and economic literacy of students; and assistance with application to competitive post-secondary institutions leading to bachelor's degree in a STEM related discipline. Students from University City High and Overbrook High are eligible to apply.

The TRIO Veterans Upward Bound (VUB) Program at the University of Pennsylvania is a FREE, non-credited, non-profit, pre-college program federally funded with a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The primary goal of TRIO VUB is to prepare eligible veterans to enter college, be successful in college, and to graduate from college. In order for students to be fully prepared for college, TRIO VUB emulates the college experience. High expectations are placed on students while attending TRIO VUB in order to support their success in the Program and later in college. TRIO VUB provides 160 students annually with academic instruction and support services. Students come to TRIO VUB from Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties in Pennsylvania and Camden County in New Jersey.

In 2017, the University launched a program for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students to support these underrepresented groups while at Penn and to recruit FGLI students to Penn. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/fgli
Penn commits to meeting full demonstrated need throughout the undergraduate years. If a family’s circumstances remain stable, financial aid remains relatively constant; if circumstances change during the year (such as a parent losing a job), a financial aid package will be adjusted.

There is no maximum income cutoff for eligibility for University financial aid. Factors such as family size, student income and assets, parent income and assets (including home equity but not retirement accounts), the number of children in college, and extenuating family circumstances (such as illness or loss of employment) are important considerations in determining financial need.


Does the institution have policies and programs to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs to promote equity and diversity among students, staff, and faculty.

The cornerstone of Penn’s initiative to increase access for students from all socioeconomic backgrounds is its All-Grant Financial Aid Policy. Penn has awarded nearly $1 billion in grants since implementing the policy in 2008, and the average net cost for aided students to attend Penn today is almost $2,700 less than it was in 2005 (in constant 2005 dollars). In 2016-17, this need-based grant program made it possible for nearly half of Penn’s undergraduate students to attend the University.

Scholarships for part-time students are facilitated through individual schools and centers. The School of Arts and Sciences awards a number of scholarships to matriculated, part-time students on the basis of academic merit, commitment and financial need.

Penn School of Nursing provides scholarships for students enrolled in either a full- or part-time graduate nursing program, employed by University of Pennsylvania Health System (verification required with application), and have a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Full-time and part-time students in the School of Policy and Practice are eligible for scholarships, based on faculty recommendation.


A brief description of the institution’s on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

University of Pennsylvania offers a discounted childcare program to Penn faculty, staff, students and University of Pennsylvania Health System employees at its Penn Children’s Center. Penn also offers additional rates at a discounted price to select faculty and staff based on income.

Penn’s Children’s Center is for children ages three months to five years of age and is conveniently located on the University campus. Enrollment in the Penn Children's Center is open to all members of the University and surrounding communities, with preference given to faculty, staff and students of the University. The center is one of few centers in the area accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

Penn Children’s Center celebrates cultural, economic, and ethnic diversity through its curriculum and programming, and incorporates learning activities into traditional playtime, through stories, arts and crafts, music and movement, science, physical fitness, and field trips. The center features 13 well-equipped classrooms, computers, an indoor gym, and an outdoor playground. Teachers hold degrees in early childhood education or a related field, and are assisted by classroom aides and university students. The 10,000-square-foot center accommodates 32 infants, 50 toddlers, and 79 preschoolers.

Penn partners with the Parent Infant Center and The Caring Center in the West Philadelphia neighborhood to provide child care options in addition to the Penn Children’s Center. These NAEYC-accredited centers have spaces for 100 more children, half of them reserved for the children of Penn faculty, staff, and students.

In addition to childcare, University of Pennsylvania also provides two additional substantially subsidized childcare benefits to its faculty and staff through a partnership with Care.com.
- Back-up-Care allows Faculty and staff to arrange for temporary backup care in their homes, at an out-of-town business location or at an adult relative’s residence any time (day or night, seven days a week, including holidays). Benefits-eligible faculty and staff members are eligible for up to ten days of backup child or adult care per calendar year. There is a cost to those who utilize this service, but Penn partially offsets the cost through a subsidy program determined based on annual salary.
- Snow Day Child Care provides all-day care for children of Penn faculty and staff members when the University is open but Philadelphia public schools are closed due to inclement weather. Children ages 12 weeks to 12 years are eligible for the program, whether they attend a Philadelphia district school or not. Care is provided at the Penn Children's Center, the University of Pennsylvania's licensed day care center.

In addition, a day care facility is currently under construction for the Center for Healthcare Technology which will accommodate 170 children.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:

Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs to promote equity and diversity among students, staff, and faculty.

There are six cultural resource centers at Penn providing services for underrepresented groups:
- The Greenfield Intercultural Center fosters intercultural understanding at Penn through cross-cultural activism, reflection, and dialogue. This cultural resource also provides resources for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students.
- La Casa Latina, Penn's Center for Hispanic Excellence, promotes awareness of Latino issues, culture, and identity.
-Penn's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Center supports the University's LGBT communities through mentoring, workshops, advocacy, and special events.
- Makuu, the Black Cultural Resource Center, is a nexus of advising, leadership development, and programming for Penn students interested in Black culture and the African Diaspora.
- The Pan-Asian-American Community House is a hub of academic, personal, and professional growth for Penn students interested in Asian-American culture and the Asian American Diaspora.
- The Penn Women's Center addresses the evolving needs of Penn's women through programming, advocacy, and community.

In addition, Penn has numerous religious organizations, arts organizations, councils, advisory boards, and student affairs affinity groups available to students from various backgrounds, as well as school-affiliated organizations within Penn's 12 schools. A full listing of these resources, with links to each organization's web page, is available on Penn's diversity website (http://diversity.upenn.edu/resources/).

Penn's College Achievement Program (PennCAP) works closely with a diverse group of academically-talented students, many from low-income and/or first-generation backgrounds, to support their success at Penn. Staff provide coaching, counseling, academic assistance, and cultural enrichment so that students can more confidently move towards their personal and academic goals. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/eap/penncap/


Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (tracking accessibility and affordability)? (If data is not available, select 'No'):
Yes

The percentage of entering students that are low-income (0-100):
14

The graduation/success rate for low-income students (0-100):
91

On average, the percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid (e.g. as reported to the U.S. Common Data Set initiative, item H2) (0-100):
100

The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required (i.e. the percentage of graduates who have not taken out interest-bearing loans) (0-100):
69

Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students (0-100):
28.60

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
---

Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The University of Pennsylvania is a major research institution, with over 3,000 degrees granted annually from twelve professional and academic schools at the Bachelor's, Master's, and Doctorate levels. Penn is committed to teaching environmental sustainability, with a goal to make climate change and sustainability part of the curriculum and educational experience available to all Penn students. (Penn's 2009 "Climate Action Plan".). This submission documents Penn's efforts during the FY17 year and compares them to the FY14 baseline year which corresponds with the University's "Climate Action Plan. 2.0".
The submission relies on information related to the main, academic, West Philadelphia campus, but to more fully document efforts across the Penn system, information related to the Morris Arboretum and New Bolton Large Animal Center has also been referenced, and noted as outside the boundary of the main campus in descriptions. The information is used to enrich examples of University efforts and is not intended to be the primary justification for credits. The responses for each of the questions and sub-questions are drawn from University materials, both internal and public documents. Each section notes the website where the information can be found.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.