Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 66.40
Liaison Madeline Schuh
Submission Date Feb. 21, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Pennsylvania
PA-6: Support for Underrepresented Groups

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Madeline Schuh
Sustainability Analyst
Facilities and Real Estate Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a publicly posted non-discrimination statement? :
Yes

The non-discrimination statement, including the website URL where the policy is publicly accessible:

The University of Pennsylvania values diversity and seeks talented students, faculty and staff from diverse backgrounds. The University of Pennsylvania does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, age, disability, veteran status or any other legally protected class status in the administration of its admissions, financial aid, educational or athletic programs, or other University-administered programs or in its employment practices.

The Penn Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Programs is charged with ensuring that the University meets its obligations as an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer and educational institution.

See: http://www.upenn.edu/affirm-action/policies-handbooks.html and http://www.upenn.edu/affirm-action/


Does the institution have a discrimination response protocol or committee (sometimes called a bias response team) to respond to and support those who have experienced or witnessed a bias incident, act of discrimination or hate crime?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s discrimination response protocol or team (including examples of actions taken during the previous three years):

The University recognizes the right of members of the community to raise questions and pursue complaints of discrimination and adheres to a strict policy that prohibits retaliation for doing so. Questions, complaints of alleged discrimination, or concerns regarding these policies or their implementation may be directed to the Executive Director, Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Programs.

http://www.upenn.edu/affirm-action/resolcomplaint.html


Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit students from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit faculty from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to recruit students, staff and/or faculty from underrepresented groups:

Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. In support of the Penn Compact 2020, the University Schools and Centers have developed numerous initiatives and programs to promote equity and diversity among students, staff, and faculty.

Towards this end, Penn's Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence outlines an extensive plan to recruit, retain, and mentor distinguished and diverse faculty. As part of the initiation of the five-year plan in 2011, Penn committed $100 million to support the plan's implementation. Over the five-year plan, the number of minority faculty has increased by 19.4% and the number of underrepresented minority faculty increased by 30%. The total number of women faculty rose to 32.7% of the total faculty population. More information and further details are reported in the inclusion report: https://provost.upenn.edu/uploads/media_items/inclusion-report.original.pdf

In 2017, the University launched a program for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students to support these underrepresented groups while at Penn and to recruit FGLI students to Penn. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/fgli. Of the incoming freshman class, 12.4% are first generation college students (http://www.admissions.upenn.edu/apply/whatpennlooksfor/incoming-class-profile)

The University also has a Mayor’s Scholars program which dates back to 1910, to support student from Philadelphia who come to Penn, and a program to support enrollment and success of veterans of the US armed forces. See https://www.collegehouses.upenn.edu/life/mayors_scholars and http://www.upenn.edu/registrar/veterans/index.html.


Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs to support students from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support faculty from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support students, staff and/or faculty from underrepresented groups:

Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community.

For Students: In 2016, Penn initiated a mandatory online program called Thrive at Penn (TAP) that assists students in their Penn experience, with a dedicated web portal for every class, including transfer students and incoming freshmen. TAP prepares students to make healthy choices during their university experience and provides information about resources available to support student success. Topics covered include thriving at a research university; wellness and health; the risks associated with alcohol and other drugs; healthy relationships and sexual violence prevention; and resources specific to student needs during freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years. See: https://www.nso.upenn.edu/tap

In addition, during New Student Orientation for freshmen and transfer students, training in cultural competency is presented through two mandatory sessions: Safe Living at Penn, a student-oriented guide to working and relaxing safely at Penn, and Speak About It, a performance about consent, boundaries, and healthy relationships.

In 2017, the University launched a program for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students to support these underrepresented groups while at Penn and to recruit FGLI students to Penn. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/fgli

There are six cultural resource centers at Penn providing services for underrepresented groups:
- The Greenfield Intercultural Center fosters intercultural understanding at Penn through cross-cultural activism, reflection, and dialogue. This cultural resource also provides resources for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students.
- La Casa Latina, Penn's Center for Hispanic Excellence, promotes awareness of Latino issues, culture, and identity.
-Penn's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Center supports the University's LGBT communities through mentoring, workshops, advocacy, and special events.
- Makuu, the Black Cultural Resource Center, is a nexus of advising, leadership development, and programming for Penn students interested in Black culture and the African Diaspora.
- The Pan-Asian-American Community House is a hub of academic, personal, and professional growth for Penn students interested in Asian-American culture and the Asian American Diaspora.
- The Penn Women's Center addresses the evolving needs of Penn's women through programming, advocacy, and community.

In addition, Penn has numerous religious organizations, arts organizations, councils, advisory boards, and student affairs affinity groups available to students from various backgrounds, as well as school-affiliated organizations within Penn's 12 schools. A full listing of these resources, with links to each organization's web page, is available on Penn's diversity website (http://diversity.upenn.edu/resources/).

Penn's College Achievement Program (PennCAP) works closely with a diverse group of academically-talented students, many from low-income and/or first-generation backgrounds, to support their success at Penn. Staff provide coaching, counseling, academic assistance, and cultural enrichment so that students can more confidently move towards their personal and academic goals. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/eap/penncap/

In addition, Penn has several fully staffed Cultural Resources Centers, specifically dedicated to support students from under-represented groups. The Cultural Resource Centers provide trainings focused on cultural competencies, diversity, and equity throughout the year, available to all students. Penn’s Cultural Resource Centers include: The Pan-Asian American Community House, the Greenfield Intercultural Center, La Casa Latina, the LGBT Center, Makuu: the Black Cultural Resource Center, and the Penn Women's Center. These Centers, located in the geographic core of campus provide counseling, career advice, crisis intervention services, and other support services. For more information, see: http://www.admissions.upenn.edu/life-at-penn/our-diverse-community/cultural-resource-centers

Penn’s Chaplain’s Office and Spiritual and Religious Life Center also provides similar services for members of any religion, available throughout the year. See: https://chaplain.upenn.edu

Staff and Faculty: The Human Resources Department provides support to staff and faculty from under-represented groups, and conducting these trainings in each division and office, including for Penn's 700+ persons trades and unionized employees.

The Penn Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Programs (OAA/EOP) is responsible for providing educational training programs to assist members of the University community in recognizing and understanding discrimination, harassment and retaliation. In addition, this office offers information on how to address behaviors that violate University policies, and how to be proactive in creating a respectful and productive work environment. See: http://www.upenn.edu/affirm-action/policies-handbooks.html

For staff and faculty, Penn has numerous programs and support systems to ensure equity and diversity in hiring and advancement at Penn, including the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (http://www.upenn.edu/affirm-action/ ) and the resources and direction provided by the Human Resources Department https://www.hr.upenn.edu/

Penn’s Committee on Diversity and Equity, which reports to the University Council, aids Penn in fostering and taking full advantage of its diversity as well as in strengthening ties across all boundaries to enrich and enliven the campus community. The Committee advises the Offices of the President, Provost, and the Executive Vice President on ways to develop and maintain a supportive atmosphere on campus for the inclusion and appreciation of diversity among all members of the University community. The Committee reviews and provides advice regarding the University’s equal opportunity and affirmative action programs and policies. The areas in which the Committee reports to the University Council include diversity within educational and work settings, integration of staff and faculty into the larger campus community, and ways to foster a campus environment that is inclusive and supportive of difference. The Committee also advises the administration on specific diversity issues that may arise on campus.
See the Penn Diversity website at http://www.upenn.edu/life-at-penn/diversity and https://secure.www.upenn.edu/secretary/council/de.html

Penn has a robust support program for staff and faculty from under-represented groups, including the following offices and services:

* African-American Resource Center, which is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life of faculty, staff, and students at the University of Pennsylvania with a particular focus on those of African decent. Any person associated with the university may use its free and confidential services as needed.
(see http://www.upenn.edu/aarc/);
* The Vice Provost for Faculty oversees faculty life and the academic personnel process, including recruitment, retention and retirement; appointments, tenure and promotions; enhancement of faculty diversity and gender and minority equity; and resolution of individual faculty issues, including grievances (see https://news.upenn.edu/news/anita-l-allen-appointed-vice-provost-faculty-penn);
* The Office of the Ombudsman (see: http://www.upenn.edu/ombuds/) and Penn's School and Center HR Offices, includes services for workplace issues resolution, staff grievances, retaliation, and all related policies and procedures. The Office of the University Ombuds' mission is to ameliorate those conditions that may impede community members from finding satisfaction with their lives at Penn.
* Penn's Central HR office includes services for workplace issues resolution, staff grievances, retaliation, and all related policies and procedures (see https://www.hr.upenn.edu/)
* The "Penn Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence" outlines an extensive plan to recruit, retain, and mentor distinguished and diverse faculty. As part of the initiation of the five-year plan in 2011, Penn committed $100 million to support the plan's implementation. Over the five-year plan, the number of minority faculty has increased by 19.4% and the number of underrepresented minority faculty increased by 30%. The total number of women faculty rose to 32.7% of the total faculty population. More information and further details are reported in the inclusion report: https://provost.upenn.edu/uploads/media_items/inclusion-report.original.pdf


Does the institution have training and development programs, teaching fellowships and/or other programs that specifically aim to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members:

Penn President Amy Gutmann's vision for Penn's future to foster inclusion, innovation and impact is detailed in the Penn Compact 2020 (https://president.upenn.edu/penn-compact). The Penn Compact 2020’s goal of inclusion strives to improve diversity and equity at Penn for all members of the Penn community. The cornerstone of Penn’s initiative to increase access for students from all socioeconomic backgrounds is its All-Grant Financial Aid Policy. Penn has awarded nearly $1 billion in grants since implementing the policy in 2008, and the average net cost for aided students to attend Penn today is almost $2,700 less than it was in 2005 (in constant 2005 dollars). In 2016-17, this need-based grant program made it possible for nearly half of Penn’s undergraduate students to attend the University.

The critical importance of Penn’s All-Grant Policy is underscored by the Penn Impact 2020 initiative to raise $1 billion for student financial aid by 2020. This unprecedented goal comprises $600 million for undergraduate assistance and $400 million for graduate and professional student assistance, building on the respective $360 million and $110 million raised in the groundbreaking Making History Campaign, which ended in 2012. Dr. Gutmann's push to increase student diversity under the Penn Compact 2022 is equaled by a concomitant drive to increase faculty diversity. Penn’s Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence outlines an extensive plan to recruit, retain, and mentor ever more distinguished and diverse faculty, and is backed by $100 million in institutional investments.

The Action Plan includes the expansion of initiatives to recruit exceptional professors of color. These include school-based Diversity Action Plans and the University-wide Presidential Professorship, as well as programs that increase diversity in the faculty pipeline, ultimately building a legacy that enriches not only the Penn community, but also the larger academic community and the wider world. As part of the initiation of the five-year plan in 2011, Penn committed $100 million to support the plan's implementation. Over the five-year plan, the number of minority faculty has increased by 19.4% and the number of underrepresented minority faculty increased by 30%. The total number of women faculty rose to 32.7% of the total faculty population. More information and further details are reported in the inclusion report: https://provost.upenn.edu/uploads/media_items/inclusion-report.original.pdf

Program for Students:
In 2017, the University launched a program for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students to support these underrepresented groups while at Penn and to recruit FGLI students to Penn. The FGLI Program supports students' academic, personal, and social transition needs while facilitating community-building and a sense of belonging. Through this program, students have access to a number of resources including career & internship assistance as well as academic assistance. For more information, see https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/fgli
Career & Internship Assistance: students can receive funding for summer internship and/or research opportunities that would otherwise be low or unpaid. In addition, students in the program can also receive graduate school entrance assistance. More information can be found here: https://www.vpul.upenn.edu//FGLI_internship.php
Academic Assistance: students have access to the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program, tutoring, the Office of Learning Resources, and many others. One of note is the PENNCAP (Pennsylvania College Achievement Program) which provides a comprehensive set of services to support success for approximately 500 academically talented students, many from low income, first-generation to college backgrounds, during their entire undergraduate careers at Penn. A professional staff provides counseling, academic support, advocacy, technology resources, financial support, cultural enrichment, and assistance in developing meaningful personal, professional and educational goals.
The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF) Program at Penn provides a small cohort of extraordinary Humanities and Social Sciences undergraduates with an array of programming services. Students selected as Fellows are matched with a faculty mentor who serves as a role model and research advisor. Under the mentor's guidance, Fellows are encouraged to discover an intellectual identity as they begin the process of becoming scholars and teachers. Fellows receive benefits including paid national and international summer research internships, research support during the academic year, book stipends, access to disciplinary conferences, and other opportunities. The Penn MMUF program has a 100% graduation rate and an 82% graduate program matriculation rate. The Penn MMUF program currently has five undergraduate Fellows. For more information about program history and current news, visit: https://www.vpul.upenn.edu/mmuf-about.php

In addition, Penn has several fully staffed Cultural Resources Centers, specifically dedicated to support students from under-represented groups. The Cultural Resource Centers provide trainings focused on cultural competencies, diversity, and equity throughout the year, available to all students. Penn’s Cultural Resource Centers include: The Pan-Asian American Community House, the Greenfield Intercultural Center, La Casa Latina, the LGBT Center, Makuu: the Black Cultural Resource Center, and the Penn Women's Center. These Centers, located in the geographic core of campus provide counseling, career advice, crisis intervention services, and other support services. For more information, see: http://www.admissions.upenn.edu/life-at-penn/our-diverse-community/cultural-resource-centers
- The Greenfield Intercultural Center fosters intercultural understanding at Penn through cross-cultural activism, reflection, and dialogue. This cultural resource also provides resources for First Generation and Low Income (FGLI) Students.
- La Casa Latina, Penn's Center for Hispanic Excellence, promotes awareness of Latino issues, culture, and identity.
-Penn's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Center supports the University's LGBT communities through mentoring, workshops, advocacy, and special events.
- Makuu, the Black Cultural Resource Center, is a nexus of advising, leadership development, and programming for Penn students interested in Black culture and the African Diaspora.
- The Pan-Asian-American Community House is a hub of academic, personal, and professional growth for Penn students interested in Asian-American culture and the Asian American Diaspora.
- The Penn Women's Center addresses the evolving needs of Penn's women through programming, advocacy, and community.

In addition, Penn has numerous religious organizations, arts organizations, councils, advisory boards, and student affairs affinity groups available to students from various backgrounds, as well as school-affiliated organizations within Penn's 12 schools. A full listing of these resources, with links to each organization's web page, is available on Penn's diversity website (http://diversity.upenn.edu/resources/).

Penn’s Chaplain’s Office and Spiritual and Religious Life Center also provides similar services for members of any religion, available throughout the year. See: https://chaplain.upenn.edu

In 2016, Penn initiated a mandatory online program called Thrive at Penn (TAP) that assists students in their Penn experience, with a dedicated web portal for every class, including transfer students and incoming freshmen. TAP prepares students to make healthy choices during their university experience and provides information about resources available to support student success. Topics covered include thriving at a research university; wellness and health; the risks associated with alcohol and other drugs; healthy relationships and sexual violence prevention; and resources specific to student needs during freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years. See: https://www.nso.upenn.edu/tap

In addition, during New Student Orientation for freshmen and transfer students, training in cultural competency is presented through two mandatory sessions: Safe Living at Penn, a student-oriented guide to working and relaxing safely at Penn, and Speak About It, a performance about consent, boundaries, and healthy relationships.

Programs for Staff and Faculty:
The Human Resources Department provides support to staff and faculty from under-represented groups, and conducting these trainings in each division and office, including for Penn's 700+ persons trades and unionized employees.

The Penn Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Programs (OAA/EOP) is responsible for providing educational training programs to assist members of the University community in recognizing and understanding discrimination, harassment and retaliation. In addition, this office offers information on how to address behaviors that violate University policies, and how to be proactive in creating a respectful and productive work environment. Penn also has numerous programs and support systems to ensure equity and diversity in hiring and advancement at Penn, including the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (http://www.upenn.edu/affirm-action/ and http://www.upenn.edu/affirm-action/policies-handbooks.html ) and the resources and direction provided by the Human Resources Department https://www.hr.upenn.edu/

Penn’s Committee on Diversity and Equity, which reports to the University Council, aids Penn in fostering and taking full advantage of its diversity as well as in strengthening ties across all boundaries to enrich and enliven the campus community. The Committee advises the Offices of the President, Provost, and the Executive Vice President on ways to develop and maintain a supportive atmosphere on campus for the inclusion and appreciation of diversity among all members of the University community. The Committee reviews and provides advice regarding the University’s equal opportunity and affirmative action programs and policies. The areas in which the Committee reports to the University Council include diversity within educational and work settings, integration of staff and faculty into the larger campus community, and ways to foster a campus environment that is inclusive and supportive of difference. The Committee also advises the administration on specific diversity issues that may arise on campus.
See the Penn Diversity website at http://www.upenn.edu/life-at-penn/diversity and https://secure.www.upenn.edu/secretary/council/de.html

In addition to the programs listed above, these resources provide robust support program for students, staff, and faculty from under-represented groups, including the following offices and services:

* African-American Resource Center, which is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life of faculty, staff, and students at the University of Pennsylvania with a particular focus on those of African decent. Any person associated with the university may use its free and confidential services as needed.
(see http://www.upenn.edu/aarc/);
* The Vice Provost for Faculty oversees faculty life and the academic personnel process, including recruitment, retention and retirement; appointments, tenure and promotions; enhancement of faculty diversity and gender and minority equity; and resolution of individual faculty issues, including grievances (see https://news.upenn.edu/news/anita-l-allen-appointed-vice-provost-faculty-penn);
* The Office of the Ombudsman (see: http://www.upenn.edu/ombuds/) and Penn's School and Center HR Offices, includes services for workplace issues resolution, staff grievances, retaliation, and all related policies and procedures. The Office of the University Ombuds' mission is to ameliorate those conditions that may impede community members finding satisfaction with their lives at Penn.
* Penn's Central HR office includes services for workplace issues resolution, staff grievances, retaliation, and all related policies and procedures (see https://www.hr.upenn.edu/)
* The "Penn Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence" outlines an extensive plan to recruit, retain, and mentor distinguished and diverse faculty. As part of the initiation of the five-year plan in 2011, Penn committed $100 million to support the plan's implementation. Over the five-year plan, the number of minority faculty has increased by 19.4% and the number of underrepresented minority faculty increased by 30%. The total number of women faculty rose to 32.7% of the total faculty population. More information and further details are reported in the inclusion report: https://provost.upenn.edu/uploads/media_items/inclusion-report.original.pdf


Does the institution produce a publicly accessible inventory of gender-neutral bathrooms on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution offer housing options to accommodate the special needs of transgender and transitioning students?:
Yes

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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http://www.admissions.upenn.edu/life-at-penn/our-diverse-community/cultural-resource-centers

The University of Pennsylvania is a major research institution, with over 3000 degrees granted annually from twelve professional and academic schools at the Bachelor's, Master's, and Doctorate levels. Penn is committed to creating a more sustainable campus as stated in the 2014 Climate Action Plan and Dr. Gutmann's Penn Compact 2020. This submission documents Penn's efforts during the FY17 year and compares them to the FY14 baseline year which corresponds with the University's Climate Action Plan. 2.0. The submission relies on information related to the main, academic, West Philadelphia campus, but to more fully document efforts across the Penn system, information related to the Morris Arboretum and New Bolton has also been referenced and noted as outside the boundary in descriptions. The information is used to enrich examples of University efforts and is not intended to be the primary justification for credits.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.