Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 65.90
Liaison Sarah Stoeckl
Submission Date March 6, 2020

STARS v2.2

University of Oregon
OP-20: Hazardous Waste Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.00 / 1.00 Cimmeron Gillespie
Education & Analytics Coordinator
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have strategies in place to safely dispose of all hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste and seek to minimize the presence of these materials on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of steps taken to reduce hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:
Please see the Sustainable Action Plan - Hazardous Materials Management: found at the Comprehensive Environmental Policy Page https://cpfm.uoregon.edu/Policy-Sustainability Specifically section 1 "A key hazardous waste management priority is to reduce the amount and toxicity of hazardous waste generated. All campus stakeholders should make every effortto reduce, reuse, or recycle materials before final disposal. Waste reduction training, educational materials and on-site assistance is available by contacting EHS at 541-346-3192. When evaluating waste reduction opportunities, consider the following areas: Purchasing Before purchasing new, potentially hazardous materials, check with others, such as those who use nearby work areas or shared chemical storage areas, or EHS to see if the product is already available. If a purchase must be made, obtain the smallest amount of the product that will satisfy the project requirements. Over-purchasing of materials is a major contributor to unnecessary waste. Inventory Control A substantial amount of hazardous waste disposed of by the University of Oregon consists of unused, outdated, or contaminated chemicals. Careful planning of chemical quantities and monitoring of chemical storage areas can reduce costs to the laboratory, department, and university. Contact EHS as soon as chemicals are no longer being used to prevent accumulation of outdated chemicals. 3 Substitution Using non-hazardous or less hazardous material in place of the original material for a process requires some thought and research by the user. In doing this, the user is not only reducing waste but also reducing the risk of potential exposure to those in the immediate area. Process substitutions can also be used to reduce hazards. These substitutions may include using improved engineering controls to reduce waste and the risk of potential exposure. Scale Reduction Many individuals have already implemented micro-scale techniques as a method of reducing waste. Using this strategy results in the consistent and substantial reduction of hazardous waste generated over time. Product Exchange While some procedures may require new materials, quite often it is possible to borrow or trade products from other users. Checking with others in the same department, building, or other nearby work areas can save money while reducing the amount of waste generated. A little extra record keeping and communication can be beneficial for everyone. Recycling/Reuse While recycling is not a true pollution prevention strategy, this alternative is preferred to disposal since the use of virgin materials is still being kept to a minimum. EHS incorporates recycling strategies into current practices and operates the re-use facilities to assist in materials recycling. Solvent recovery systems allow solvent to be purified and reused multiple times, resulting in monetary savings, environmental protections, and a reduced waste volume."

A brief description of how the institution safely disposes of hazardous, universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:
Please see the Sustainable Action Plan - Hazardous Materials Management: found at the Comprehensive Environmental Policy Page https://cpfm.uoregon.edu/Policy-Sustainability First the institution determines if the materials are regulated, if not Priority 3 - Waste Determination When a product is no longer usable, it is considered waste. Local, state, and federal regulations define what makes a waste a “hazardous waste” specifically. Generally, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines a hazardous waste as one which is specifically listed as such or that possesses hazardous characteristics. EHS is available to assist in determining whether a material is a hazardous waste. Not all wastes are regulated wastes but they may possess characteristics which are similar to regulated wastes. In these cases, an off-site disposal method is preferred over sanitary sewer disposal or landfilling. Priority 4 - In House Treatment Acid-Base Neutralizations Small quantities of acids or bases where pH is the ONLY hazardous characteristic may be neutralized to a pH range of 5.5-12.0 and then the neutral, non-hazardous solution can be disposed into the sanitary sewer system. EHS will collect large quantities of acids or bases, or any quantity with multiple hazardous characteristics. Other forms of treatment may be acceptable if properly designated in experimental protocols such as plans for quenching materials. Consult with EHS at 6-3192 prior to implementing in house treatment. EHS will still collect quenched items and evaluate for waste determination.

A brief description of any significant hazardous material release incidents during the previous three years, including volume, impact and response/remediation:
There have been no significant hazardous material releases in the previous 3 years. Per Matt Hendrickson. In the previous report the institution referred to the Department of Homeland Security website which maintained a listing of all incidents. That website is no longer available. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has been contacted to independently confirm this information upon request. Oregon DEQ reports they have no record of any hazardous material releases at the UO. The Oregon DEQ website has a publicly viewable map of hazardous material releases (the map is referred to as the RAPTOR system and is viewable here: https://www.oregon.gov/oem/emops/Pages/RAPTOR.aspx ), the UO is not listed among the hazardous releases.

A brief description of any inventory system employed by the institution to facilitate the reuse or redistribution of laboratory chemicals:
found at the Comprehensive Environmental Policy Page https://cpfm.uoregon.edu/Policy-Sustainability Priority 5. Waste Disposal EHS collects and prepares hazardous materials for disposal by commercial contractors in accordance with local, state, and federal regulations. EHS bulks and segregates materials into their compatible groups to minimize the number of containers and waste packing materials. All materials are disposed through EPA licensed Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDF). Additionally from Matt Hendrickson of UO Environmental Health & Safety UO Eugene has a chemical reuse system utilizing a software inventory. After logging in, a UO affiliated party can check the inventory and check out chemicals. UO has approximately 1000 chemicals in good condition and take an annual inventory. Before being declared a waste, chemicals are checked on suitability for the reuse program. If there is a great demand, are in good condition, and otherwise safe for storage, the chemical has satisfied the 3 factors necessary for approval. When no longer useful, chemicals are declared a hazardous waste and handled as appropriate. The final destination of all wastes are Licensed Treatment Storage Disposal Facility (TSDF) that utilize various treatment strategies (Incinerator, aqueous treatment, solvent recovery, fuels blending for kilns).

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by the institution?:
Yes

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by students?:
Yes

A brief description of the electronic waste recycling program(s), including information about how electronic waste generated by the institution and/or students is recycled:
The UO Disposal policy on E-Waste https://ba.uoregon.edu/content/how-to-dispose-of-surplus-property . The basic guidelines for Ewaste disposal: 1) If the property is in good condition, other departments on UO campus may need it. Departments are required to post all working surplus property, e-waste and furniture, in good condition on the UO Department Surplus Listing web site for one week. 2) Computers and servers that no longer effectively run a supported operating system version should be transferred to the surplus property warehouse directly without posting to the surplus website. Materials are segregated and go to Business Affairs, Zero Waste or Campus Waste. Zero Waste works collaboratively with Business Affairs and sorts Ewaste from recycling. If you still have e-waste property after posting to the surplus listing web site, complete an UO Property Disposition Request Form (PDR) online. Also do this If an item is not usable. Ewaste goes through Business Affairs and is defined as property that can be plugged in or has batteries. A big portion of Ewaste are refrigerators. As mentioned in the guidelines, it is required to post the item to the self-serve surplus (surplus.uoregon.edu) website by completing a UO Property Disposition Request Form (PDR) online. This does not need to be approved as long as it is a UO item. A document number is generated Instructions on completing the PDR form. Instructions include: contact information and item description; disposal reason; date reported the working/usable property; if it has a Banner Number (green barcode to indicate a fixed asset; if property was purchased with Federal (Fed) funds, Gift funds or is a leased piece of property; if 4 working monitors, group them together on the same line; Keep the working and non-working items on separate lines; do not combine e-waste and furniture on the same PDR; Keep a copy of the PDR for your own files; forward the PDR to BAO Surplus Property/Oregon Hall. The items stay in the department until requested and on the website for 7 days. The information will be sent out through BAO news if for a business purpose. Contractor Next Step recycling picks up and refurbishes about 90% of the computers. Zero Waste works collaboratively with Business Affairs and sorts Ewaste from recycling. If an item is not usable, a property disposition request is completed. There are public sales offered by Athletics and the Outdoor Program for where to purchase surplus. GTF’s also can utilize the recycle program listed above. Next Step recycling is certified through the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), website here: https://www.oregon.gov/DEQ/ecycles/Pages/default.aspx All items not refurbished and resold by Next Step are send to Universal Recycling Technologies (URT) in Portland. URT is E-Steward certified. URT is listed on the e-stewards list of registered handlers: http://e-stewards.org/data/list-recyclers/

Is the institution’s electronic waste recycler certified under the e-Stewards and/or Responsible Recycling (R2) standards?:
Yes

Website URL where information about the institution’s hazardous waste program is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
Data source(s) and notes about the submission:
The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Office of Emergency Management, maintains a database of recent Hazardous Material Releases. Their database is available through the RAPTOR system on the DEQ website: https://www.oregon.gov/oem/emops/Pages/RAPTOR.aspx There are no material releases recorded through the RAPTOR system, which is in concurrence with the UO Environmental Health and Safety hazardous team's records.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Office of Emergency Management, maintains a database of recent Hazardous Material Releases. Their database is available through the RAPTOR system on the DEQ website: https://www.oregon.gov/oem/emops/Pages/RAPTOR.aspx

There are no material releases recorded through the RAPTOR system, which is in concurrence with the UO Environmental Health and Safety hazardous team's records.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.