Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 71.58
Liaison Steve Mital
Submission Date May 18, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Oregon
OP-27: Rainwater Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 Kim Carson
Administrative Program Assist
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution use Low Impact Development (LID) practices as a matter of policy or standard practice to reduce rainwater/stormwater runoff volume and improve outgoing water quality for new construction, major renovation, and other projects?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s Low Impact Development (LID) practices:

UO Eugene The UO Sustainable Development Policy resembles the City of Eugene ordinances and is referenced often in these sections: (http://pages.uoregon.edu/uplan/plandoc/CampusPlan/CampusPlan3/Policy10_CampusPlan3rdEdition2014.pdf)

The City of Eugene City Ordinances align with the UO Eugene Policy.
1) Screen development permits for post-construction stormwater management, conduct plan reviews, approve stormwater facilities, conduct inspections, and provide compliance enforcement as appropriate.
2) Maintain an up-to-date Stormwater Management Manual for new development.
3) Track, evaluate, and develop new technologies and practices for post-construction stormwater management.
4) Provide training and technical assistance on water quality facilities to city staff and the public.
5) Conduct a review of policies, practices and regulations to identify potential barriers to implementing low impact development techniques.
They a) Review stormwater management proposals at the land use and/or development permit stage (i.e. earliest level of review)
b) Review and approve construction plans for stormwater management facilities for all development sites which create 1000 square feet or more impervious surface.
c) Update Eugene’s Stormwater Management Manual every two years or as needed to provide new information or practices for post-construction stormwater management.

The Stormwater Management Manual may contain forms, maps and facility agreements and shall include requirements that are consistent with the following goals:
(1) Reduce runoff pollution from development by reducing impervious surfaces and capturing and treating approximately 80% of the average annual rainfall.
(2) Control and minimize flows from development in the Headwater Areas using a variety of techniques to release water to downstream conveyance systems at a slower rate and lower volume, thereby reducing the potential for further aggravation of instream erosion problems.
(3) Emphasize stormwater management facilities that incorporate vegetation as a key element, and include design and construction requirements that ensure landscape plant survival and overall stormwater facility functional success.
(4) Operate and maintain stormwater management facilities in accordance with facility-specific O & M Plans.
(5) Reduce pollutants of concern that are generated by identified site uses and site characteristics that are not addressed solely through the stormwater quality measures by implementing additional specific source control methods including reducing or eliminating pathways that may introduce pollutants into stormwater, capturing acute releases, directing wastewater discharges and areas with the potential for relatively consistent wastewater discharges to the wastewater system, containing spills on site, and avoiding preventable discharges to wastewater facilities, surface waters or ground waters.
(6) Except as otherwise allowed by this land use code, allow disturbances or development within drainage ways only when all of the following conditions exist:
(a) The disturbance or development will not impede or reduce flows within the drainage way;
(b) The disturbance or development will not increase erosion downstream;
and (c) The constructed pipe system is sized to convey all of the runoff from the upstream watershed when the upstream watershed is completely developed. (Section 9.6790 added by Ordinance No. 20369, enacted June 14, 2006, effective July 14, 2006;
amended by Ordinance No. 20417, enacted August 11, 2008, effective July 7, 2009; and Ordinance No. 20521, enacted January 13, 2014, effective March 1, 2014.) https://www.eugene-or.gov/477/Stormwater-Management-Manual


Has the institution adopted a rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, or strategies that mitigate the rainwater runoff impacts of ongoing campus operations through the use of green infrastructure? :
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, and/or strategies for ongoing campus operations:

Sustainable Development Water Goal: Improved Quality of Stormwater. The university will improve the quality of campus stormwater emitted into the region’s waterways by focusing on campus areas that contribute the most to the degradation of water quality—campus streets and parking lots. All development projects are required to treat the equivalent amount of stormwater runoff as required by city code; however, some of the areas treated will be shifted outside the project site to address relatively low water quality campus areas—streets and parking lots. All development projects will treat stormwater run-off from a portion of an existing UO-owned street or parking area instead of treating the equivalent amount of relatively clean, on-site, impervious surfaces, primarily defined as pedestrian surfaces such as sidewalks (especially those that do not drain directly into a stormwater pipe). The same amount of impervious surface will be treated, but the dirtier surfaces will receive greater attention. For example, if a project site has 1,000 square feet of sidewalks that must be treated, the project would not be required to treat this area; instead, it would be required to fund 1,000 square feet of stormwater treatment for an existing campus street or parking lot. The cost to treat existing streets and parking areas is determined by establishing an average cost/square foot. The project is not responsible for identifying and implementing the off-site stormwater measures. Funds are deposited into a central fund earmarked for stormwater treatment measures. Campus Operations manages the fund and appropriately implements measures needed to equal the required stormwater treatment from all development projects. Projects should be designed to accommodate the potential to treat all of their stormwater in the future. This goal requires coordination with the city (and in some cases may preclude implementation of this policy).


A brief description of any rainwater harvesting employed by the institution:

UO Eugene: The Student Rec. Center pool vault project was completed in 2015 and mitigates ~40,000 sq.ft. The cistern (adaptive reuse) was created when the original pool was converted into a sealed vault to capture rainwater from roof tops of the new buildings at the SRC. The water is now stored and used for flushing toilets and irrigating around new areas of the complex. Educational opportunities are made visible through a new information monitor showing how the rain collection system works. As people enter the building, they walk across a faint green line on the floor, outlining the shape of the old pool below. This simple gesture brings awareness to the transformation of adaptive reuse. ***An average year of rainfall (400,000 gal captured), provides the SRC with water for flushing toilets and irrigating their new landscape. If rainfall is low in any given year, recycled water is supplemented with regular water. The Outdoor Program Barn has permeable paving in the boat cleaning station and bike parking area and two 1,500 gallon cisterns that mitigate about 6,000 sq.ft. The cisterns collect seasonal rainwater from the rooftop of the building. The water is then used for flushing toilets, laundry and rinsing off rental boats. Permeable Paving allows rainfall and runoff water to infiltrate into the ground. Regarding satellite locations: OIMB and UO Portland both have rainwater cisterns. White Stag has been getting 67% credit for stormwater managed onsite through Portland's Clean River Rewards Program: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/41976


Rainwater harvested directly and stored/used by the institution, performance year:
450,000 Gallons

A brief description of any rainwater filtering systems employed by the institution to treat water prior to release:

UO Eugene has runoff swales along Alder street that feed into a contach that filters out oil, trash, sediment, etc. There are over 20 mechanical devises with other proprietary names. They were built to collect run off from parking lots and along the street prior to entering the storm water drains. Other examples are provided in the sections below. The numerous vegetated rain gardens, green roofs, bioswales, flow-through planters, mechanical devices to filter water, permeable pavement, riparian areas left intact along streams, tree growth to break fall of rain and store water at roots with an excess of 4,000 trees on the UO Eugene Campus, Forest Reserve at OIMB, high elevation trees at Pine Mountain. All of these systems contribute to the filtering of rainwater by the institution.


A brief description of any living or vegetated roofs on campus:

UO Eugene: 1) The Global Scholars Hall rain garden and green roof was completed in 2012 and mitigates ~25,000 sq.ft. (Rain garden + Green Roof) The green roof (extensive) absorbs direct seasonal rainfall and provides a viewing area for students from their dormitory windows. 2) The Ford Alumni Center flow-through planter, green roof and green roof seating were completed in 2011 and mitigates~63,597 sq.ft. Green Roof (intensive) is located over the parking garage, near the back entrance of the building. The vegetated roof functions to absorb direct rainfall, and also provides a gathering space surrounded by horticultural plantings and seating areas. The flow-through planter receives water from the rooftop of the building and infiltrates the runoff into a large vegetated planter. 3) The Frohnmayer Music Building green roof - north side was completed in 2010 and mitigates~6,000 sq.ft. The green roof (extensive) is located over top of classrooms and is planted with an array of grasses that function to absorb direct rainfall. The plantings encourage wildlife habitat and provide a view of a seasonally changing landscape for users working inside the building. The permeable paving allows the courtyard rainfall to infiltrate into the ground and directs any excess runoff into surrounding garden beds. 4) The HEDCO Building bioswale, rain garden, roof garden filtration and infiltration basins were completed in 2009 and mitigates 179,303 sq.ft of impervious area and 256,901 sq.ft of total area. The vegetated bioswales filter and clean runoff from the main parking lot and underground garage. It features native plants that support wildlife habitat. The rain garden receives water from rooftops of buildings and walkway covers. The water is creatively directed into garden beds, densely planted with a variety of plantings. The filtration basins convey water from the building roof and filter through a series of planters. The green roof (intensive) is located over garage and mainly functions to absorb direct rainfall and as a gathering space. 5) Lokey Laboratories roof garden was completed in 2007 and mitigates about 20,000 sq.ft. The roof garden (intensive) is located on top of underground laboratories. It absorbs direct rainfall and functions as a gathering space. 6) The Many Nations Longhouse bioswale and green roof were completed in 2005 and mitigate~4,000 sq.ft. The vegetated bioswale filters and cleans runoff from Columbia Street and adjacent parking lot. It features native plants that support wildlife habitat. The green roof (extensive) is beautifully planted with a prairie of native grasses and herbaceous perennials. It functions to absorb direct rainfall and the elevation of the vegetated rooftop provides an engaging view to users of the surrounding buildings. 7) The Lillis Business Complex was complete in 2004 and mitigates ~ 300 sq.ft. The green roof (extensive) is located on the 4th floor in a small nook on the South/West side of the building. The garden functions to absorb direct rainfall and provides a beautiful view for indoor users, especially in the summer and fall during the plantings’ seasonal color changes.


A brief description of any porous (i.e. permeable) paving employed by the institution:

UO Eugene: 1) The Global Scholars Hall rain garden, permeable paving and green roof was completed in 2012 and mitigates ~6,000 sq.ft. The permeable paving allows rainfall to infiltrate into the ground. Runoff from adjacent impermeable area (service road) is directed and absorbed, instead of running off into parking to below. 2) The Frohnmayer Music Building green roof and permeable paving was completed in 2010 and mitigates ~6,000 sq.ft. The green roof (extensive) is located over top of classrooms and is planted with an array of grasses that function to absorb direct rainfall. The plantings encourage wildlife habitat and provide a view of a seasonally changing landscape for users working inside the building. The permeable paving allows the courtyard rainfall to infiltrate into the ground and directs any excess runoff into surrounding garden beds. 3) Villard Alley permeable asphalt was completed in 2008 and mitigates 33,541 sq.ft. The permeable asphalt allows rainwater to directly infiltrate into the ground. The parking planters feature a mixture of grasses and evergreen plantings that support wildlife habitat. 4) The Lawrence Hall Courtyard rain garden and permeable paving was completed in 2006 and mitigates ~6,000 sq.ft. The rain garden receives water from the rooftop of the building and directs the runoff into vegetated planters. It features native and horticultural plantings as well as concrete and solid wood seating walls. The permeable paving allows courtyard rainwater to infiltrate into the ground and any runoff flows into adjacent planters. 5) The Heart of Campus flow-through planters and permeable paving were completed in 2004 and mitigates 10,000 sq.ft. The flow-through planters receive street runoff from University and 13th. The planters are designed to direct the runoff into the vegetated planters, slow the water down and infiltrate it into the ground. Permeable Paving receives excess street runoff that is not taken up by the flow through planters and either they infiltrates it into the ground or directs it into an overflow drain. 6). The Jordan Schnitzer Museum Art Parking Lot permeable paving was completed in 2004 and mitigates 3,000 sq.ft. The permeable paving allows parking lot rainfall to infiltrate into the ground and any excess runoff is directed into adjacent planting beds. 7) The Outdoor Program Barn permeable paving - boat cleaning station and cisterns mitigate ~6,000 sq.ft. The cisterns collect seasonal rainwater from the rooftop of the building. The water is then used for flushing toilets, laundry and rinsing off rental boats. The permeable paving allows rainfall and runoff water to Infiltrate into the ground. 8) There is extensive use of engineered turf around Global Scholars Hall. Regarding the other satellite locations: OIMB does not pave their parking lots, roads or driveways but leaves it all in gravel. The sand is a natural storage mechanism for storm water. The shire has little pavement. UO Portland is mostly concrete building with little pavement.


A brief description of any downspout disconnection employed by the institution:

UO Eugene: The Student Rec Center and the Outdoor Program Barn have downspouts that feed into cisterns.


A brief description of any rain gardens on campus:

UO Eugene has many rain gardens on campus and more are constructed as new developments are built. 1) Global Scholars Hall rain garden and green roof was completed in 2012 and mitigates ~25,000 sq.ft. The rain garden receives water from some of the rooftops of the buildings and creatively directs it into a larger planter. It features native plants and a conveniently located seating wall for a gathering area. The green roof (extensive) absorbs direct seasonal rainfall and provides a viewing area for students from their dormitory windows. 2) The Lewis Integrative Science Building (LISB) rain garden was completed in 2012 and mitigates 36,727 impervious sq.ft. and 50,837 total sq.ft. The rain garden receives water from the rooftop of the building, which is directed into a series of holding basins. It features a native plant palette and basalt rocks, reminiscent of a riverbed. 3) The Matt Knight Arena has a flow-through planter flow-through planter that was completed in 2011 and mitigates 63,597 sq.ft of impervious and total sq.ft.. The raingarden receives water from the rooftop of the arena and infiltrates the runoff into vegetated planters. It features a convenient seating wall for users, and provides education about storm water management to the large crowds during games. 4) The HEDCO Building was completed in 2009 and has a bioswale, rain garden, roof garden, filtration beds and infiltration basins. It mitigates 179,303 sq.ft. The vegetated bioswales filter and clean runoff from the main parking lot and underground garage. They features native plants that support wildlife habitat. The rain garden receives water from rooftops of buildings and walkway covers. Water is creatively directed into garden beds, densely planted with a variety of plantings.
Filtration basins convey water from the building roof and filter through a series of planters. A green roof (intensive) is located over garage and mainly functions to absorb direct rainfall and as a gathering space. 5) The Lawrence Hall Courtyard was completed in 2006 and mitigates about 6,000 sq.ft. The rain garden receives water from the rooftop of the building and directs the runoff into vegetated planters. It features native and horticultural plantings as well as concrete and solid wood seating walls. Permeable Paving allows courtyard rainwater to infiltrate into the ground and any runoff flows into adjacent planters. 6) The Straub Hall Courtyard rain garden was completed in 2001 and 2015 and mitigates ~4,000 sq.ft. The rain garden receives water from the rooftop of Straub Hall and directs it into a small garden where the water is diffused by river rocks and absorbed into a small-vegetated garden bed. Permeable Paving allows for rainfall to infiltrate into the ground of the courtyard. The courtyard features horticultural plantings with seating areas. 7) The Vivian Olum Child Development Center rain garden was completed in 2007. The rain garden receives water from the rooftop of a small building. The water is directed into a planter that contains native and non-native plantings.
8) Walton Hall rain garden mitigates ~3,000 sq.ft.


A brief description of any stormwater retention and/or detention ponds employed by the institution:

UO Eugene: The Student Rec. Center pool vault project was completed in 2015 and mitigates ~40,000 sq.ft. The cistern (adaptive reuse) was created when the original pool was converted into a sealed vault to capture rainwater from roof tops of the new buildings at the SRC. The water is now stored and used for flushing toilets and irrigating around new areas of the complex. Educational opportunities are made visible through a new information monitor showing how the rain collection system works. As people enter the building, they walk across a faint green line on the floor, outlining the shape of the old pool below. This simple gesture brings awareness to the transformation of adaptive reuse. ***An average year of rainfall (400,000 gal captured), provides the SRC with water for flushing toilets and irrigating their new landscape. If rainfall is low in any given year, recycled water is supplemented with regular water. The Outdoor Program Barn has permeable paving in the boat cleaning station and bike parking area and two 1,500 gallon cisterns that mitigate about 6,000 sq.ft. The cisterns collect seasonal rainwater from the rooftop of the building. The water is then used for flushing toilets, laundry and rinsing off rental boats. Permeable Paving allows rainfall and runoff water to infiltrate into the ground. Regarding satellite locations: OIMB and UO Portland both have rainwater cisterns. White Stag has been getting 67% credit for stormwater managed onsite through Portland's Clean River Rewards Program: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/41976


A brief description of any bioswales on campus (vegetated, compost or stone):

UO Eugene has many vegetated bioswales on campus and new ones are installed as development evolves. 1) The Millrace bioswale pond was completed in 2001 and mitigates and area of 6,000 square feet. It is a vegetated bioswale that directs some of the runoff from Franklin Blvd through a storm drain and empties into the bioswale where the water is filtered and cleaned. The water is then either absorbed into the ground, or conveyed through a set of basins and weirs before entering into the adjacent Millrace. Features similar native plantings as the ones found along the Millrace. 2) The Moss Street Children’s Center was completed in 2004 and is a vegetated bioswale runs through playground outside of building and mitigates ~20,000 sq. ft. The bioswale then directs water under a covered bridge and out to the entrance of the main building where the water has a chance to filtrate into the ground. Features native plantings that support wildlife habitat. 3) The Many Nations Longhouse bioswale and green roof bioswale was completed in 2005 and mitigates about 4,000 sq.ft. The vegetated bioswale filters and cleans runoff from Columbia Street and adjacent parking lot. It features native plants that support wildlife habitat. The green roof (extensive) is beautifully planted with a prairie of native grasses and herbaceous perennials. It functions to absorb direct rainfall and the elevation of the vegetated rooftop provides an engaging view to users of the surrounding buildings. 4) The HEDCO Building was completed in 2009 and has a complex system that includes a bioswale, rain garden, roof garden, filtration beds and infiltration basins mitigating 173,303 sq.ft. The vegetated bioswales filter and clean runoff from the main parking lot and underground garage. It features native plants that support wildlife habitat. The rain garden receives water from rooftops of buildings and walkway covers. Water is creatively directed into garden beds, densely planted with a variety of plantings. The filtration basins convey water from the building roof and filter through a series of planters. A green roof (intensive) is located over garage and mainly functions to absorb direct rainfall and as a gathering space. 5) The Walnut Station Parking Lot was completed in 2010 and mitigates 39,457 sq.ft of impervious area and a total of 69,711 sq.ft total area. The Vegetated Bioswale filters and cleans runoff from parking lots and features native plantings that support wildlife habitat. 6) The Jaqua Academic Center has a bioswale path that was completed in 2010 and mitigates ~60,000 sq.ft. The vegetated Bioswale filters and cleans runoff from the parking lot and features native plantings that support wildlife habitat. 7) The Northside Parking area has a vegetated bioswale that was competed in 2011 and mitigates 30,000 sq.ft. The vegetated bioswale filters and cleans runoff from the parking lot and features native plantings that support wildlife habitat. 8) The Johnson Parking Lot has a vegetated bioswale that was completed in 2011 and mitigates ~6,000 sq.ft. It filters and cleans runoff from Johnson Lane Parking Lot and features a lush grove of native plantings. 9) Allen Hall has a vegetated bioswale and flow-through planter that was competed in 2013. The flow through planter receives runoff from adjacent parking lot by means of scuppers that direct water into the planter. Runoff is absorbed and cleaned though plants and ground infiltration. It features native and horticultural plantings and a seating wall for users. 10) 15th Avenue flow through planters and seating that was completed in 2015 and mitigates~ 8,000sq.ft. The Flow-Through Planters are integrated along 15th Street and in between parking areas. The sunken and walled planters filter and clean runoff from the road. French drains convey runoff underground and the planters feature an assortment of grasses plantings and conveniently built-in wooden seating areas for users.


A brief description of any other rainwater management technologies or strategies employed by the institution:

UO adheres to progressive city ordinances. We constantly focus on improving water storage, filtering and retention.


The website URL where information about the institution’s rainwater management initiatives, plan or policy is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.