Overall Rating Silver - expired
Overall Score 63.29
Liaison Allison Mihalich
Submission Date Oct. 13, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Notre Dame
PA-6: Support for Underrepresented Groups

Status Score Responsible Party
3.00 / 3.00 Mike Seamon
Vice President
Campus Safety & University Operatis
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a publicly posted non-discrimination statement? :
Yes

The non-discrimination statement, including the website URL where the policy is publicly accessible:

Statements of non-discrimination are part of the University Mission, Vision and Values. The website is nd.edu/about/mission-statement/
Some excerpts from the Mission statement:
'The intellectual interchange essential to a university requires, and is enriched by, the presence and voices of diverse scholars and students.'
' In addition, the University seeks to cultivate in its students not only an appreciation for the great achievements of human beings but also a disciplined sensibility to the poverty, injustice and oppression that burden the lives of so many. The aim is to create a sense of human solidarity and concern for the common good that will bear fruit as learning becomes service to justice.'


Does the institution have a discrimination response protocol or committee (sometimes called a bias response team) to respond to and support those who have experienced or witnessed a bias incident, act of discrimination or hate crime?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s discrimination response protocol or team (including examples of actions taken during the previous three years):

Speak Up is Notre Dame's online reporting system to report concerns of discrimination, harassment, sexual assault, and other issues. This site also offers resources to support students and their friends.
Speak Up is completely confidential: 'If you report a concern, please keep in mind: you are in control of what information you choose to share. Speak Up will not track your IP address.'
website for further information: http://speakup.nd.edu/
The Diversity and Inclusion site details other policies and reporting: http://diversity.nd.edu/resources/


Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit students from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit faculty from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to recruit students, staff and/or faculty from underrepresented groups:

Staff- Notre Dame has an on-line talent community, social media presence, recruitment fairs, passive and active recruiting, and local job fairs. The director of staff diversity and inclusion performs multiple outreach activities and assists leadership with diversity action plans.
Faculty - Notre Dame appointed its first director for academic diversity and inclusion in 2016. This role directs efforts within the academy focused on diversity and inclusion, working with partners across all academic levels to ensure the University fosters an environment in which everyone may flourish. Key responsibilities center on coordination, training and development, recruitment, retention, and communications, and acting as the point person for colleges and departments as they implement the diversity and inclusion plans developed in response to the Faculty Experience Survey and aimed at enhancing Notre Dame’s faculty climate. The University has recently joined the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium.
Students - The University has a Spring Visitation program to recruit students from underrepresented groups. A team of staff and students work during the fall semester calling potential applicants and then the spring semester organizing and participating in Spring Visitation weekends.


Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs to support students from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support faculty from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support students, staff and/or faculty from underrepresented groups:

Faculty - The University has an affiliation with the National Center for faculty Development & Diversity. They have recently visited campus and our faculty have access to their services throughout the year.

The Office of Student Enrichment (OSE) was founded in 2016 and exists to ensure all students have the opportunity to flourish at Notre Dame.
Born from the heart of the University's mission to care for the whole person, the Office of Student Enrichment is designed to:
Help students acclimate and adjust to a collegiate environment
Provide access to all things that make the Notre Dame experience special
Enable every student to reach their full potential
By offering personal support, social enrichment, and growth opportunities for high-achieving and under-resourced students, the Office of Student Enrichment hopes to create a welcoming and inclusive environment for each student to reach their full potential. Programs address students' academic, social, and professional development needs, and address topics like peer mentoring, financial literacy tools and training, career discernment and resources, helping student navigate Notre Dame and college life, and networking at Notre Dame and beyond.

Notre Dame fosters success, bringing high school students to campus through our Pre-College Programs, which allow them to experience living and learning on campus during the summer:
•Summer Scholars offers rising high school juniors and seniors with outstanding academic records an opportunity to explore one of 13 academic fields of study with some of Notre Dame's finest faculty members.
•Global Issues Seminar offers rising high school seniors with excellent academic records the chance to learn about the future challenges facing young Catholic leaders through a series of lectures by distinguished faculty, group discussions, and collaborative projects.
•Latino Community Leadership Seminar offers outstanding Hispanic students entering their senior year of high school an opportunity to explore the role of Latinos in U.S. society through a series of presentations, discussions, and experiences that will help them develop strong leadership skills.
•Seminar for African American Scholars offers talented, enthusiastic, and open-minded African American students entering their senior year of high school a chance to delve into the rich historical, political, and spiritual legacy of African-American culture.

Notre Dame also offers two TRiO Programs for pre-college students, Educational Talent Search and Upward Bound. Notre Dame’s TRiO Programs have been essential to helping thousands of local students lay the foundation for a lifetime of achievement. Through tutoring, mentoring, academic counseling, career exploration, cultural enrichment and community service, today’s students continue to reach higher, dream bigger and expect more of themselves as a result of their experiences with TRiO.

Current students can continue down the path of success through programs supported through the Office of Student Affairs' Multicultural Student Programs and Services (MSPS). The MSPS also works to provide students with access to programs, services, and clubs that will help them to expand and explore cultural diversity and multicultural education. Students will also find avenues to leadership growth, professional development, and academic excellence through MSPS.

o Historically underrepresented students are encouraged to develop critical thinking skills through opportunities of research, internships, and foreign travel through the Building Bridges Mentoring Program, and they stay connected with the program throughout their time at Notre Dame.

At the beginning of their sophomore year, historically underrepresented students with a highly competitive GPA are invited to become members of the Honors Students and High Achievers Program, and during their time in the program they are encouraged to maintain a competitive academic record, conduct research with faculty, and explore a path that leads to graduate school.

The Gender Relations Center (GRC) promotes moral formation consistent with Catholic identity, mission and values in an effort to create a healthier culture at the University of
Notre Dame. Committed to the spiritual, emotional and intellectual development of all students, the GRC engages women and men in respectful dialogue and seeks to build a
community that fully honors the human dignity of each person as a creature of God. The center exists to serve the Notre Dame community in the following ways:

•Encourage and facilitate dialogue among students about topics related to relationships, gender and sexuality
•Offer programs on topics related to relationships, gender and sexuality, including Prism - ND's first official student organization dedicated to serving the LGBTQ and ally community on campus
•Serve as a campus resource
•Facilitate opportunities for on-going training in the campus community
•Coordinate and provide support to student clubs and organizations concerned with relationships, gender and sexuality

The graduate school provides competitive fellowships to promote diversity. U.S. citizens or permanent residents seeking admission to any division of the graduate school who are first-generation, low-income college students and/or who are African American, Asian American, Hispanic, or Native American are eligible for nomination by their
departments. The Erskine A. Peters Fellowship, for example, is awarded to outstanding African American doctoral candidates in the social sciences and humanities.

We strive to create an inclusive, diverse, and vibrant environment through many student activities, organizations, and events. Students can perform in annual talent and variety shows such as the Asian American Association's Asian Allure and the Black Cultural Arts Council’s Black Images. They can learn about the history of Hawaiian and Pacific Islander cultures through Luau and celebrate the Latino culture through dance and vocal performances in Latin Expressions. Graduate students can also get involved in campus life through graduate student clubs.

Faculty and staff are supported and mentored through seven Employee Resource Groups: Adelante Hispanos, Black Faculty and Staff, International, Spectrum (LGBTQ), Thrive, Veterans, and Young Leaders of Notre Dame.


Does the institution have training and development programs, teaching fellowships and/or other programs that specifically aim to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members:

The Graduate School of the University devotes a page in its website detailing all the resources available to diverse and underrepresented students:
http://graduateschool.nd.edu/admissions/diversity-of-notre-dame/
The ND Multicultural Student Programs and Services has a number of initiatives:
http://msps.nd.edu/ways-to-get-involved/academic-initiatives/
The MSPS Scholars Program at the University of Notre Dame prepares underrepresented sophomores, juniors, and seniors for graduate school programs http://msps.nd.edu/ways-to-get-involved/academic-initiatives/msps-scholars/

The University of Notre Dame offers the following fellowships to support underrepresented graduate students:
o Clare Boothe Luce Fellowships for Women in Science and Engineering
o The University Presidential Fellowships in Humanities and Social Sciences are open to international students.
o Fernández Fellowships for students from Puerto Rico
o The Joseph L. Gaia Distinguished Fellowship in Latino Studies funds doctoral students in any discipline who choose some aspect of Latino Studies as their area of specialization.
o Deans’ Fellowships are open to U.S. citizens or permanent residents in any division of the Graduate School who are first-generation, low-income college students and/or who are African American, Asian American, Hispanic, or Native American.


Does the institution produce a publicly accessible inventory of gender-neutral bathrooms on campus?:
No

Does the institution offer housing options to accommodate the special needs of transgender and transitioning students?:
No

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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