Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Michael Lizotte
Submission Date Sept. 18, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of North Carolina, Charlotte
AC-1: Academic Courses

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Michael Lizotte
University Sustainability Officer
Facilities Planning
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Figures required to calculate the percentage of courses with sustainability content::
Undergraduate Graduate
Total number of courses offered by the institution 2969 1177
Number of sustainability courses offered 17 8
Number of courses offered that include sustainability 57 12

Number of academic departments (or the equivalent) that offer at least one sustainability course and/or course that includes sustainability (at any level):
21

Total number of academic departments (or the equivalent) that offer courses (at any level):
46

Number of years covered by the data:
One

A copy of the institution’s inventory of its course offerings with sustainability content (and course descriptions):
---

An inventory of the institution's course offerings with sustainability content (and course descriptions):

UNC Charlotte Course Offerings 2015-2016
Courses marked by * were modified by faculty development workshop participants.

SUSTAINABILITY COURSES:

AFRS 2170 Introduction to Health and Environmental Issues in the Africana World: A general introduction to the cultural, social, political, ethical, and psychological dimensions of health and environmental issues affecting the African and African Diaspora peoples globally, and the policy implications.
AFRS 4630 Environmental and Public Health in Africa: In-depth analysis of environmental and public health hazards in Africa, including pandemic, as well as the principles and practice of public health, pollution control, and waste management. The social and political contexts of the environmental and health issues in Africa are emphasized throughout.
ANTH 2126 World Population Problems: An examination of various world population “problems,” such as growth, migration, fertility, and population aging, in order to learn how cultural, political, economic, and environmental factors influence and are influenced by the population structure of a given society.
ANTH 2127. Environmental Anthropology: Anthropological approaches to environmental issues as they affect people around the world, including the relationships between humans and their natural environments, cultural knowledge about environments, the role of wealth and inequality in environmental interactions, international and global environmental governance, and the effects of these on management decisions and outcomes.

ARCH 3102. Architecture Design Studio: The final studio in the Core Program focuses on the theme of “Systems Integration.” Students interrogate matters of mechanical systems and building envelopes, as well as information systems and new media technologies, foregrounding their impact on sustainability and spatial organization and occupation.
ARCH 5302 Environmental Systems Principles: Introduces qualitative and quantitative analytical methods commonly used to assess the impact of environmental forces on occupant thermal and luminous comfort, energy performance, and regional sustainability. Students are introduced to the interplay between climatic events, patterns of building use, and the architectural variables that inform the appropriate application of building systems technology. Topics include: building envelope performance, and the introduction of passive and mechanical systems for heating, cooling, illuminating, and ventilating buildings.
CEGR 4246 Energy and the Environment: A quantitative survey of the sources and uses of energy and an analysis of their economic, environmental, and social impacts to society.
CEGR 4247 Sustainability: Focuses on sustainability as it applies to civil engineering, including land development choices, infrastructure planning, material selection and disposal, energy sources, and water supply and treatment. Methods of assessing sustainability and incorporating sustainable features in design are reviewed.
CMET 2680 Professional Development II: Sustainable Engineering and Construction: Professional seminar study of introductory concepts of sustainability and their application to engineering and construction. Course includes presentations by industry professionals.
ECON 4181 Energy and Environmental Economics: Economic issues of both energy and environment. Energy issues include the historical development of energy resources, supply and demand considerations and projections of the future energy balance. Environmental issues are externalities, common property resources, and government regulation. Policy considerations include environmental standards, pollution charges, and property rights. Cost benefit analysis and microeconomic theory are applied.
ESCI 2101 The Environmental Dilemma: Nature, causes, and responses to major environmental problems.
ESCI 3101 Global Environmental Change: Fundamental principles of the climate, including the physical processes responsible for global climate change; relationships between past, present, and future changes; and societal and environmental impacts.
GEOG 1110. Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning: An overview of current and historical trends in Urban and Regional Planning. Examines how plans and planning have been used to resolve social, environmental, and economic conflicts. Topics include: planning in industrial cities, land use planning, planning and social injustice, economic development, transportation planning, planning for global sustainability.
GEOG 4215 Urban Ecology: An introduction to the emerging field of urban ecology. Explores the biological, physical, and social components of the urban ecosystem at local, regional, and global scales. Emphasis on the interplay among components and the sustainability of cities during lectures, field trips, and group discussions.
GEOL 3105 The Earth’s Mineral Resources: Sustainability and the Environmental Impacts of Recovery: The origin, distribution, consumption rates and environmental impacts of mining and processing the Earth’s mineral resources. A significant portion of class lectures promote a deeper understanding of the current oil, gas and coal industries and their relationship to the world’s energy production and use. The long-term sustainability of these energy systems is also discussed.
HLTH 4103 Environmental Health: Introduction to environmental and occupational health issues and their implications for individual and population health.
HLTH 4280 Global Health Issues: Introduction to current issues in global health including disparities, root causes, and strategies for resolution.
HLTH 6205 Environmental Health: Contemporary environmental factors including biological, physical, and chemical factors which affect the health of a community. Traditional elements of environmental health, including the control of infectious diseases, toxicology, and environmental health policy and practices at local, state, and federal levels.
INES 8101 Environmental Systems: Examines the principles of energy and mass transport as applied to the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and the Earth’s biogeochemical systems and how these impact human activities and infrastructure. Emerging environmental issues and technologies in the areas of environmental impact due to human activities and natural disasters, and environmental sustainability including industrial ecology, waste minimization and recycling, will also be examined.
INES 8102 Infrastructure Systems: Overview of urban infrastructural development. Sustainable design features for facilities including municipal, transit, industrial, agricultural, telecommunications, and waste management. Impact of infrastructure development on environmental management including storm water quality and quantity, soil and channel erosion, urban air quality, sprawl, and waste production, treatment, and storage.
MGMT 3282 Managerial Ethics: A study of the impact of management decisions on customers, employees, creditors, shareholders, community interests, ecology, and government (including taxes and the regulatory environment). The objective is to provide future managers with a systematic way of analyzing the impact of management decisions on larger society.
MSRE 6130 Site Planning, Building Design and Construction Fundamentals: Introduces essential principles of site planning, design and construction. Special emphasis is placed on programming and sustainability issues for different project types. The nature and characteristics of construction materials, equipment, and systems used in modern buildings will be presented and how they affect function and feasibility.
MUDD 6102 Urban Open Space and Infrastructure Design Studio: This intermediate design studio focuses on the sustainable development of neighborhoods, districts, sites and urban open spaces, exploring design process issues as well as the continued acquisition and practice of a variety of technical and graphic skills.
MUDD 7103. Advanced Vertical Urbanism / Global Urban Design Studio, Part II: Part two of an advanced, two-part design studio focuses on site-specific projects in countries outside the USA and emphasizes methods of research and design as well as technological and systemic issues of sustainability in dense and vertical urban environments. Part II is held in Charlotte and completes the design projects commenced abroad.
NUDN 8160 Global Health and Social Justice: An interdisciplinary human rights and social justice perspective of contemporary issues, problems and controversies that effect social, economic, political, and environmental global health.

COURSES THAT INCLUDE SUSTAINABILITY

ANTH 3152 Early Civilizations: Great civilizations of Old and New Worlds; Mesopotamia, India, Greece, Africa, Egypt, China, Mexico, Peru; theories of cultural evolution; beginnings of complex societies; archaeological theory and method; environment, and ecology of first civilizations.
ARCH 4202. Architectural History II: 1750-Present: Global survey of architecture and urbanism from 1750 to the present. Explores key architectural and urban ideas, designers, buildings, and urban projects as well as how they were shaped by their environmental, political, economic, technological, and cultural context.
ARCH 4302 Environmental Systems Principles: Introduces qualitative and quantitative analytical methods commonly used to assess the impact of environmental forces on occupant thermal and luminous comfort, energy performance, and regional sustainability. Also introduces the interplay between climatic events, building use, and the architectural variables that inform the appropriate application of building systems technology. Topics include: Building envelope performance, and the introduction of passive and mechanical systems for heating, cooling, illuminating, and ventilating buildings.
ARCH 5305. Building Systems Integration: Introduces a set of advanced issues related to the comprehensive, systemic integration of building technology systems commonly used in large-scale buildings through case study, analytical, and simulation methods. Topics address the resolution of building structure, materials, environmental systems, mechanical systems, electrical systems, life safety, building water supply and waste, and conveying systems in building design.
BIOL 2140L General Biology Lab*: Population ecology, evolution, phylogenetics, invertebrate biology, animal and plant physiology.
BIOL 3144 Ecology: Interrelationships of organisms and their environment.
BIOL 4258. Epidemics and Plagues: A study of the history, modeling, epidemiology, environmental, and behavioral changes that contributed to the development of selected epidemics and plagues which have dramatically affected plants, agricultural animals, and humans.
BUSN 1101 Introduction to Business and Professional Development: Fundamentals of business, including accounting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, management, management information systems, and operations and supply chain management.
CEGR 2102 Engineering Economic Analysis: Economic analysis of engineering solutions; present and annual worth analysis; cost benefit analysis; internal rate of return analysis; bonds and cost estimating.
CEGR 3141 Intro. To Environmental Engineering: Environmental engineering concepts, including stream pollution analysis, water and wastewater treatment processes; solid and hazardous waste management practices; pollution problems and controls; mass balance analyses, and review of pertinent legislation.
CEGR 3161 Transportation Engineering I: Analysis of transportation facilities; planning, location, economic considerations, safety analysis, and Intelligent Transportation components, with special emphasis on land transportation.
CEGR 4162 Transportation Planning: Urban transportation; travel characteristics of urban transportation systems; analysis of transportation-oriented studies; analytic methods of traffic generation, distribution, modal split, and assignment; traffic flow theory.
CEGR 4171 Urban Public Transportation: Planning, design, and operation of bus, rail, and other public modes. Relationship between particular modes and characteristics of urban areas. Funding, security and other administrative issues.
CEGR 4242. Wastewater Treatment Design: Analysis and design of wastewater treatment processes. Regulatory requirements, water quality testing, pretreatment, primary treatment, biological processes, nutrient removal, disinfection and tertiary/advanced processes.
CEGR 4264. Landfill Design and Site Remediation: Principles of waste disposal and sanitary landfill siting including design, construction, operation and maintenance. Site assessment of underground storage tank leaks; site remediation, and clean up technologies using choice and economic analysis and computer applications.
CHFD 3115. An Ecological Approach to Learning and Development - Early Childhood to Pre-Adolescence: Examines learning and development in the context of the child’s physical and social environments, including home, neighborhoods, schools, communities, national policies and global influences. Specific attention to the approaches to learning, emotional/social, health/physical, cognitive, and language/communication domains and theories as seen in a multicultural context.
CUYC 3600. Community Engagement Capstone Seminar: Provides a culminating and comprehensive experience for students in the Minor in Urban Youth and Communities. Students synthesize the interdisciplinary theory and experiential learning around urban youth and education, communities, and social justice into a comprehensive community and school-based project lead by the student using practices of participatory action research.
ECON 1101 Economics of Social Issues: Economic issues without emphasis on theoretical models. Contemporary economic issues such as pollution control, healthcare, unemployment, and crime are studied.
ECON 2102 Principles of Economics-Micro: Pricing mechanism of a market economy, the industrial organization of the U.S. economy, problems of economic concentration, the theory of income distribution, and comparative economic systems.
EDCI 8182 Power Privilege and Education*: Addresses the critical interconnections of race, class, gender, sexuality and power and privilege in education and beyond. Investigates how these intersections influence individual and group level outcomes. Decodes issues of power and privilege in schools and society, and explores how this awareness can help create an entirely new social landscape.
EDCI 8186 Globalization, Urbanization and Urban Schools*: Explores globalization locally and internationally, with special emphasis on how global development processes are affecting urban communities and urban schools. Explores issues of global governance, global inequality, low-wage economics, and the transnationalization of the globe. It investigates conceptual and theoretical issues underlying globalization, and their impacts on the production of knowledge, educational policy, and school curricula.
EMGT 5961 Introduction to Energy Systems: Overview of energy systems: energy types, generation, conversion, storage, transportation/transmission, and utilization. Principles, physical structure, processes, and utilization of fossil fuel, nuclear, and renewables for transportation, thermal, and electrical energy generation are discussed along with associated performance metrics. Also provides an introduction to environmental impacts of energy production, lifecycle analysis, energy efficiency concepts and metrics, transmission systems, grid reliability, and the impact of smart grid technologies. All topics are presented in the context of industry standards as well as federal and state regulations.
EMGT 5962 Energy Markets: Energy and power systems in regulated and competitive environments and implications on business decisions for firms in these industries. Topics include: mechanism of energy markets; comparative market systems; determination of prices under different market structures; gas, oil, coal, and electricity market architecture; electricity market design; dispatch and new build decisions; smart grid and renewable energy in electricity markets; risk and risk management in energy including demand and price volatility and use of financial derivatives; and the impact of financial market trends and current and proposed policies on the energy industry.
EMGT 6915 Engineering Decisions and Risk Analysis*: After introducing components and challenges of decision making, the course proceeds with the discussion of structuring decisions using decision trees and influence diagrams. Decision making under uncertainty is emphasized including maximax, maximin, and minimax regret techniques. Modeling of different risk attitudes based on risk and return tradeoffs are analyzed through utility theory. Finally, decisions under conflicting objectives and multiple criteria are discussed along with some introduction to game theory.
ENER 4140 Energy Management: Study of the understanding and implementation of energy management techniques. Emphasis is on energy efficiency applications in homes, businesses, large buildings and industry. Topics include: energy auditing, energy management, energy cost analysis, energy & electric rate structures, lighting, HVAC systems, motors & drivers, boilers and steam systems, cogeneration, commercial and industrial applications and alternative energy sources.
ENER 4250 Analysis of Renewable Energy Systems: System analysis of renewable energy systems: well-to-wheels analysis, lifecycle energy and emissions, total cost, skill sets, methodologies and tool kits needed to analyze various technologies on a consistent basis for a given application. Solar photovoltaics, wind energy, and fuel cell technologies will be covered.
ESCI 2210 Field Methods in the Earth and Environmental Sciences: Field techniques used in studies of earth and environmental sciences. Skills related to the collection and presentation of scientific data emphasized.
ESCI 3205 Water Resources: The distribution of fresh water and its relevance to society and ecosystems. Fundamentals of the science of water, human use and influence on water, and issues of water management, policy, and law.
ETCE 2410 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Technology: This course is designed to serve as an introduction to environmental engineering technology. The course will provide an overview of the environmental field to include laws and regulations, water quality, hydraulic and hydrologic fundamentals, water and wastewater treatment, groundwater contamination, and solid waste management.
ETFS 3124 Risk Management for Emergency Service: An exploration of management and organizational principles with emphasis on controlling the risk associated with operations in the emergency services. In depth discussion of recognizing and controlling risk, personnel accountability, incident management systems and post-incident analysis as related to the emergency services. Critical analysis of private protection measures available to reduce loss potential.
ETFS 4123 Community Threat Assessment and Mitigation: Focuses on the emergency service’s responsibility while conducting major operations involving multi-alarm units, and natural and man-made disasters that may require interagency or jurisdictional coordination. Emphasis is on threat assessment and mitigation strategies of potential large scale disasters including but not limited to earthquakes, hurricanes, terrorism, hazardous materials releases, tornadoes, and floods. Topics include: fire-ground decision making, advanced incident command, command and control, safety, personnel accountability, hazard preparedness, mitigation, response, recovery, evacuation, sheltering, and communications.
ETGR 3222 Engineering Economics: Principles of evaluating alternative engineering proposals. Compound interest formulas and applications, present worth, equivalent uniform annual value, rate of return, depreciation and depletion, economic feasibility of projects.
GEOG 1103 Spatial Thinking*: An overview of spatial thinking fundamentals and how geospatial technology can be used to illustrate these notions. Spatial thinking combines: (1) concepts of space, (2) tools of representation, and (3) processes of reasoning, to better structure spatially explicit phenomena, and generate hypothesis to understand and explain those issues. Emphasizes various aspects of spatial thinking as a way of addressing spatially explicit phenomena applied to an array of disciplines.
GEOG 3115. Urban Transportation Problems: Problems associated with moving goods, people and information in urban areas. Topics include: mass transit and pollution problems.
GEOG 3215 Environmental Planning: Interaction and relationships between natural and human-made elements of the environment with emphasis on planning concepts and methodologies used in contemporary environmental planning.
GEOG 3250 World Food Problems: Magnitude, consequences, major causes and potential solutions to the world’s food problems.
GEOG 4132. Spatial Modeling for Social and Economical Applications: Theories and practices of spatial modeling with social and economical applications. Topics include: overview of modeling in human geography, socioeconomic data sources, and building and evaluating spatial models. Examples of models covered in class and lab exercises include: spatial accessibility, interaction, diffusion, tipping points, segregation (simulation), geodemographic/segmentation, and Markov models (stochastic).
GEOG 4216. Landscape Ecology: An introduction to landscape ecology, the study of the interplay between spatial pattern and ecological process. Lectures and in-depth group discussions focus on the fundamental and applied aspects of topics such as habitat fragmentation, animal movement in human-dominated landscapes, landscape legacies, road ecology, and landscape planning.
GEOL 3190 Environmental Geology: Aspects of geology with direct or indirect impact on society. Topics include: slope stability, earthquake hazards, solid waste disposal, flooding, ground water problems, soil loss, sediment pollution, watershed dynamics, water and soil pollution, and radioactive waste disposal.
HGHR 2100 Introduction to Holocaust, Genocide, & Human Rights Studies: War Peace, Justice, & Human Survival: Examines the Nazi Holocaust and its origins in Western thought and practice. Analyzes the psychological, cultural, and political roots of other genocides and forms of mass violence. Explores modern concepts of human rights and the role of human rights activism.
HLTH 3200. History of Public Health: An overview of health and illness from a population perspective, emphasizing the social and historical contexts in which key public health events have occurred. The content provides an historical interpretation of the development of public health - including the battle against infectious disease - across time and in today’s world.
HLTH 4104. Epidemiology: Introduction to basic principles and methods used in epidemiology to detect and control disease in populations.
HLTH 6201 Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health: Introduction to concepts and theories from the social and behavioral sciences relevant to public health practice and research. Effects of selected social and psychological factors including demographic, socioeconomic and life style indicators on health.
JOUR 2160 Introduction to Journalism*: Introduction to the basics of print journalism. Students cover a variety of stories designed to develop news and feature reporting/writing skills. Emphasis is placed on generating story ideas, making ethical news judgments, diversity issues in journalism, gathering information, and writing and editing articles.
LBST 2214 Issues of Health and Quality of Life: A study of individual and social aspects of health. Analysis of individual health and illness behavior and theory; the social, political, and economic contexts of health and illness; and the broad cultural, ethical, and religious understandings of health and illness.
MDSK 2100 Diversity and Inclusion in Secondary Schools*: For students interested in the field of education and teaching at the high school level. Provides an introduction to education including social, historical, and philosophical foundations, major issues, diversity, and students with special needs. Requires 12 hours of field-based activities in high schools and non-school settings, divided between general classrooms and special education settings. Service-learning sections of this course may have additional requirements.
MKTG 3221 Consumer Behavior and Strategy: Examination of consumer decision-making processes in the purchase, usage and disposal of goods, services and ideas. Emphasis on understanding consumption-related behaviors and the development and evaluation of marketing strategies intended to influence those behaviors. Particular focus on managing changes in consumption behavior.
MPAD 6350 Public Sector Financial Management*: Takes students beyond the introductory material in MPAD 6131 into a more thoroughgoing analysis of the finance function in modern governments. The dimensions of budgeting and financial management theory and practice which are examined include: public sector managerial accounting for revenues and expenditures; basic governmental accounting principles and procedures; the relationship of budgets to the accounting system; principles and concepts of revenue policy and administration.
MUDD 5601 Community Planning Workshop: Serves to acquaint students with contemporary theory and practice in planning and urban design; to give students experience in applying planning and urban design theory and methods to actual problems; to provide students with experience in compiling and analyzing community scale data, working with citizens, professional planners and designers, and elected officials, to provide students with experience in the preparation of oral reports and technical documents; and to examine what it means for the planner and urban designer to demonstrate ethical responsibility to the public interest, to clients and employers, and to colleagues and oneself.
MUDD 5602 Planning, Law, and Urban Design: Examines the impact of planning law on the urban form of cities, both historically and in terms of contemporary professional practice. It surveys the impacts of planning regulations from Philip of Spain’s “Laws of the Indies” at the beginning of American colonization through the development of English common law property rights, their extension to America and the development of zoning and planning legislation during the 20th century. Special attention is paid to current applications of form-based zoning codes in Britain and America and their implications for urban design and the patterns of settlement.
MUDD 6101 Fundamentals of Urban Design Studio: This introductory urban design studio focuses on fundamental concepts as well as the acquisition and practice of a wide range of technical and graphic skills and media. It is intended to serve as an arena to explore and test issues focused around the making of sustainable public infrastructure, spatial definition by buildings, and the particular dynamics of civic and social spaces.
NURS 2200. Human Growth and Development: Study of the developing person through the lifespan by examining the relationship of selected environmental and social factors to human growth and development. Consideration of the meaning of health and illness to the individual, the family, and the community within the context of life as a continuing, dynamic process from conception through death.
NURS 4240. Population Focused Nursing: Examination and analysis of concepts and theories related to care of populations from a perspective of social justice. Focuses on health indicators and risk reduction in diverse groups across the lifespan and development of community partnerships within healthcare systems.
PHIL 3810. Social and Political Philosophy: Examination of basic concepts involved in understanding the nature and structure of political and social formations. Issues may include topics such as justice, human rights, the nature of political power, and the relations between individuals and political/social institutions. Readings from historical and/or contemporary sources, and may include figures such as Plato, Hobbes, Marx, Rawls, Arendt, Foucault and Butler.
SEGR 2101 Systems Engineering Concepts*: This course provides the foundation for systems engineering processes and practices. The contents cover the discussion of current systems issues, basic systems engineering processes, and the roles of systems engineering professionals in a global business environment. It also will cover the principles of mechanical drawing and computer aided design (CAD) for systems engineering applications.
SEGR 3107 Decision and Risk Analysis*: Useful tools for analyzing difficult decisions and making the right choice. After introducing components and challenges of decision making, discusses structuring decisions using decision trees and influence diagrams. Decisions under conflicting objectives and multiple criteria are also covered, as well as sensitivity and risk analysis.
SEGR 4961 Introduction to Energy Systems: Overview of energy systems: energy types, generation, conversion, storage, transportation/transmission, and utilization. Principles, physical structure, processes, and utilization of fossil fuel, nuclear, and renewables for transportation, thermal, and electrical energy generation are discussed along with associated performance metrics. Also provides an introduction to environmental impacts of energy production, life-cycle analysis, energy efficiency concepts and metrics, transmission systems, grid reliability, and the impact of smart grid technologies. All topics are presented in the context of industry standards as well as federal and state regulations.
SEGR 4962 Energy Markets: Energy and power systems in regulated and competitive environments and implications on business decisions for firms in these industries. Topics include: mechanism of energy markets; comparative market systems; determination of prices under different market structures; gas, oil, coal, and electricity market architecture; electricity market design; dispatch and new build decisions; smart grid and renewable energy in electricity markets; risk and risk management in energy, including demand and price volatility and use of financial derivatives; and the impact of financial market trends and current and proposed policies on the energy industry.
SEGR 4963 Energy Systems Planning: Optimal planning of resources, logistics, distribution and storage in the end to end energy value chain from upstream natural gas production through mid-stream transportation and storage to downstream power generation, utility distribution and consumption. Smart Grid Optimization. Supplier and customer relationship management, contracts management. Lean-Six Sigma energy system process design. Power systems reliability and control, preventive maintenance, predictive maintenance, process and service quality control.
SEGR 4964 Case Studies in the Energy Industry: Interpret and analyze real world business cases in the energy sector. Cases explore the concepts behind natural monopolies, utility ownership, regulation and de-regulation, utility rates, and service standards. Additionally, economic concepts such as supply and demand, market pricing, producer surplus, monopolistic pricing and ratemaking (regulatory goals, revenue requirements, and the rate base and rate cases) are applied. Some of the cases explore decision-making strategies surrounding marginal prices, congestion management, congestion revenue, electric and gas transmission rights both in terms of physical versus financial markets, locational marginal prices (LMP), financial transmission rights in terms of revenue adequacy and auction revenue rights, and typical energy trading hedging practices.
SOCY 1101 Introduction to Sociology*: The scientific study of society and its structures, culture and its building blocks, and group interactions; the sociological perspective and process; fundamental concepts, principles, and procedures to understand society.
SOCY 2163 Sociology of Gender*: Changing patterns of gender inequality; socialization and social structure as basis of gendered behavior, ideologies, and relationships. Alternative gender models and social movements as vehicles to diminishing gender inequality.
SOCY 3250. Political Sociology: Sociological analysis of the relationship between social, economic and political systems. Focuses on power relations in society and its effects on the distribution of scarce resources. Topics covered may include: theories of power and the nation state, political participation and voting, religion and politics, the comparative welfare state, media and ideology, the global economy, war and genocide, revolutions, and social movements. (cross-listed as POLS 3251).
SOCY 4111 Social Inequality: Distribution of power, privilege, and prestige; correlates and consequences of inequality; national and international comparisons.
SOCY 4125 Urban Sociology: Cross-cultural analysis of urban development, social structure, ecology, demographic composition, and social problems.
SOWK 2182 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I: Human development within the biological, psychological, and social structure as it occurs throughout the lifespan.
SOWK 2183 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II: The foundational framework for understanding human interaction between individuals, families, communities, and larger social systems.
SOWK 3988 Social Work Research II*: Quantitative and qualitative research and the understanding of scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge.
SOWK 6151 Social Work, Social Justice, and Diversity: Examines individual, systemic, and ideological factors related to diversity and social justice. Theories and perspectives that contribute to understanding oppression and privilege are emphasized. Implications for social work practice, research, and policy are examined. Strategies to counter discrimination and oppression are identified. Requires considerable critical analysis and self-reflection on the part of participants.


The website URL where the inventory of course offerings with sustainability content is publicly available:
A brief description of the methodology the institution followed to complete the course inventory:

A list of courses was drawn from a review of course descriptions and when available online, course syllabi. Courses offered in 2015-2016 were screened to exclude courses with sections smaller than 4 students and those that were individually-focused.


How did the institution count courses with multiple offerings or sections in the inventory?:
Each course was counted as a single course regardless of the number of offerings or sections

A brief description of how courses with multiple offerings or sections were counted (if different from the options outlined above):
---

Which of the following course types were included in the inventory?:
Yes or No
Internships No
Practicums Yes
Independent study No
Special topics No
Thesis/dissertation No
Clinical No
Physical education No
Performance arts Yes

Does the institution designate sustainability courses in its catalog of course offerings?:
No

Does the institution designate sustainability courses on student transcripts?:
No

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.