Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 71.75
Liaison Cindy Shea
Submission Date July 24, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
PA-7: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.69 / 4.00 Rachelle Feldman
Associate Provost and Director of Scholarships and Student Aid
Office of Scholarships and Student Aid
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

The Carolina Covenant (through the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid) makes college possible for qualified students regardless of their financial means. Students from households that earn less than 200% of the federal poverty level graduate debt free. Grants and work-study positions pay the bills. North Carolina residency is not required. A student may be designated as a Covenant Scholar when admitted to Carolina as a first year or transfer student. Carolina was the first major public university in the US to introduce such a program in 2003. In 2016, nearly 20% of Carolina students were first generation college students, the first in their families to attend college.

http://carolinacovenant.unc.edu/

Additionally, UNC meets 100% of the need for all eligible financial aid applicants. 96% of undergraduates who received need-based financial aid also received scholarship and/or grant aid.

http://carolinacovenant.unc.edu/

Additionally, UNC meets 100% of the need for all eligible financial aid applicants. 96% of undergraduates who received need-based financial aid also received scholarship and/or grant aid.


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

In order to boost retention and graduation rates, Carolina Covenant Scholars are matched with a volunteer faculty or professional staff member who mentors them during their first year at Carolina. The mentor commits to support a small group of Scholars in their daily lives and to help them discover and participate in campus life and community-building activities.

Each year, some 35 mentors attend a training session before meeting with their Scholars, work with up to 15 Scholars each, meet with Scholars individually, and host social activities for the students in their group.

http://carolinacovenant.unc.edu/facultystaff-mentors-guides-advocates-friends/


A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

Project Uplift (sponsored by Diversity and Multicultural Affairs in conjunction with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions) organizes a college life experience for rising seniors from under-served communities or disadvantaged backgrounds and in the top 25% of their class. It enables students to visit classes, meet with faculty and staff, interact with students, and participate in cultural and social activities. The goal is to enhance the racial/ethnic and socio-economic diversity of Carolina's undergraduate student body. Each year, high school guidance counselors across North Carolina nominate students to attend the 2-day program, and approximately 1,200 students participate. https://diversity.unc.edu/resources/prospective-students/project-uplift/

NC Renaissance (sponsored by Diversity and Multicultural Affairs in conjunction with North Carolina Renaissance) is a one-week enrichment program for rural high school sophomores to participate in sessions exploring team building, college admissions, financial aid, the Ackland Art Museum, and community service. http://diversity.unc.edu/resources/prospective-students/north-carolina-renaissance/

Other recruitment and retention programs include Upward Bound, Carolina Advising Corps, Increasing Diversity and Enhancing Academia (IDEA), Carolina Millennial Scholars Program, Cultural Competence Leadership Institute, and Carolina Latinx Collaborative.

NC Renaissance (sponsored by Diversity and Multicultural Affairs in conjunction with North Carolina Renaissance) is a one-week enrichment program for rural high school sophomores to participate in sessions exploring team building, college admissions, financial aid, the Ackland Art Museum, and community service. http://diversity.unc.edu/resources/prospective-students/north-carolina-renaissance/

Other recruitment and retention programs include Upward Bound, Carolina Advising Corps, Increasing Diversity and Enhancing Academia (IDEA), Carolina Millennial Scholars Program, Cultural Competence Leadership Institute, and Carolina Latinx Collaborative.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

James M. Johnston Awards (Office of Scholarships and Student Aid) are the University's premier need-based scholarships. Every year, approximately 25 entering freshman are chosen to be Johnston Scholars, based on outstanding high school records, financial need, and leadership potential. Faculty mentors, Johnston honors seminars, and special leadership activities are included as part of the program. Johnston scholarships are renewable, provided the recipients achieve a minimum grade point average of 3.0. The scholarship also covers additional expenses associated with UNC-sponsored Study Abroad programs.
http://studentaid.unc.edu/types-of-aid/internal-scholarships/

Awards for new and returning Johnston Scholars totaled more than $1.7 million in 2010.

The Blanchard Scholarship is a one-time award of $5,000, though in the event of demonstrated financial need, the scholarship can be renewed on a year-by-year basis. Applicants must demonstrate affiliation with an Episcopal Church. Priority consideration is given to applicants with financial need.


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

Tar Heel Target (Diversity and Multicultural Affairs): Minority student recruitment volunteers visit their hometown high schools during Carolina’s fall break and meet with prospective students in various locations around North Carolina and a few specifically selected schools out of state. http://diversity.unc.edu/resources/prospective-students/tar-heel-target/


A brief description of the institution’s other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

The Burch Fellows Program recognizes undergraduate students at the University who possess extraordinary ability, promise, and imagination. It grants up to $6,000 to support self-designed, off-campus experiences that will enable students to pursue a passionate interest in a way and to a degree not otherwise possible.


Does the institution have policies and programs to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

Permanent UNC-Chapel Hill employees can have tuition waived for up to two courses per year (this includes classroom, online, and correspondence courses). If you are a UNC-Chapel Hill employee enrolled at UNC-Chapel Hill, the tuition waiver may also be applied to one summer session course per academic year.


A brief description of the institution’s on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and UNC Health Care Systems jointly own the University Child Care Center and contract with the Victory Village Day Care Center to manage the facility. The Center is a nationally accredited, five-star licensed, non-profit child care center. Children enrolled at the University Child Care Center are children of students, faculty and staff of UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC Health Care Systems. The population is a diverse group that reflects the race, ethnic and cultural diversity of the Chapel Hill community. The center can accommodate 120 children, ranging from infants to five year-olds.

The Child Care Financial Assistance Program was developed and funded through the Chancellor’s Child Care Advisory Committee. It is designed to provide financial assistance to UNC-Chapel Hill employees and students for quality child care.

The Child Care Financial Assistance Program was developed and funded through the Chancellor’s Child Care Advisory Committee. It is designed to provide financial assistance to UNC-Chapel Hill employees and students for quality child care.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:

On-line courses that accommodate non-traditional schedules are offered in a variety of disciplines. Multiple courses are offered in each of 28 disciplines from anthropology to Spanish.
The Boot Print to Heel Print orientation sessions are designed specifically for current and former members of the military.


Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (tracking accessibility and affordability)? (If data is not available, select 'No'):
Yes

The percentage of entering students that are low-income (0-100):
22

The graduation/success rate for low-income students (0-100):
86.60

On average, the percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid (e.g. as reported to the U.S. Common Data Set initiative, item H2) (0-100):
100

The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required (i.e. the percentage of graduates who have not taken out interest-bearing loans) (0-100):
60

Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students (0-100):
44

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.