Overall Rating Bronze
Overall Score 35.20
Liaison Laura Miller
Submission Date Aug. 1, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of New Haven
EN-10: Community Partnerships

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.00 / 3.00
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Name of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability :
The Tow Youth Justice Institute

Does the institution provide financial or material support for the partnership? :
Yes

Which of the following best describes the partnership timeframe?:
Multi-year or ongoing

Which of the following best describes the partnership’s sustainability focus?:
The partnership supports at least one, but not all three, dimensions of sustainability

Are underrepresented groups and/or vulnerable populations engaged as equal partners in strategic planning, decision-making, implementation and review? (Yes, No, or Not Sure):
No

A brief description of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability, including website URL (if available) and information to support each affirmative response above:

The Tow Youth Justice Institute seeks to reform the juvenile justice system by promoting effective practices, programs, and policies related to youth justice, while focusing on the needs of individuals up to the age of 21. The four key goals of the Tow Youth Justice Institute are as follows:
1) Provide a leadership development program designed for mid-level leaders from public and private agencies and organizations to create a network of individuals trained in youth justice reform efforts.
2) Expand undergraduate and graduate curricula at the University of New Haven to broaden course offerings and support the formation of a strong, innovative youth justice program and future workforce.
3) Increase opportunities for students to participate in youth justice internships and cooperative work experiences.
4) Research and evaluate training, planning, and policy developments in the juvenile court system to integrate evidence-based practices and programs in the youth justice system.
Since its inception in 2014, the University of New Haven’s Tow Youth Justice Institute has partnered with numerous organizations including the Tow Foundation, the State of Connecticut, the Children’s Health and Development Institute, and the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. One of the initiatives created because of the Tow Youth Justice Institute’s partnerships was the School-Based Diversion Initiative (SBDI). Supported by the Children’s Health and Development Institute (CHDI), the State Department of Education (SDE), the State Judicial Branch Court Support Services Division (CSSD), the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS), and the Connecticut Department of Children and Families (DCF), individuals in the Tow Youth Justice Institute work with schools in Connecticut to incorporate restorative justice practices with the hope of reducing arrests, suspensions, and expulsions. Another opportunity the Tow Youth Justice Institute provides with the partnership of the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven is the leadership development program – Transforming Youth Justice: A Leadership Development Program. The goals of this program are:
1) To build the capacity of present and future leaders as agents of change, transforming youth justice from a community response paradigm.
2) To advance leadership development skills and knowledge of best practices in reform, organizational and community change, and self-awareness.
3) To be a resource to the organizations, communities, and systems serving youth through a network of dedicated leaders.

https://www.newhaven.edu/academics/centers-institutes/tow-youth-justice-institute/index.php


Name of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability (2nd partnership):
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Does the institution provide financial or material support for the partnership? (2nd partnership):
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Which of the following best describes the partnership timeframe? (2nd partnership):
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Which of the following best describes the partnership’s sustainability focus? (2nd partnership):
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Are underrepresented groups and/or vulnerable populations engaged as equal partners in strategic planning, decision-making, implementation and review? (2nd partnership) (Yes, No, or Not Sure):
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A brief description of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability, including website URL (if available) and information to support each affirmative response above (2nd partnership):
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Name of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability (3rd partnership):
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Does the institution provide financial or material support for the partnership? (3rd partnership):
---

Which of the following best describes the partnership timeframe? (3rd partnership):
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Which of the following best describes the partnership’s sustainability focus? (3rd partnership):
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Are underrepresented groups and/or vulnerable populations engaged as equal partners in strategic planning, decision-making, implementation and review? (3rd partnership) (Yes, No, or Unknown):
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A brief description of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability, including website URL (if available) and information to support each affirmative response above (3rd partnership):
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A brief description of the institution’s other community partnerships to advance sustainability:
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.