Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 54.76
Liaison Jamie Greiner
Submission Date March 22, 2021
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Mount Union
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Jamie Greiner
Sustainability and Campus Outreach Manager
Nature Center
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a published strategic plan or equivalent guiding document that includes sustainability at a high level? :
No

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

We are currently in the process of developing a new Strategic Plan beginning in 2021.

Strategic Initiatives that address sustainability issues (social, economic, and environment):

A. Enrich the experience of an increasingly diverse student body
 Goal A.1.4: Increase offerings and campus engagement in diversity
programming.
 Goal A.2.4: Foster an inclusive and supportive environment for international
students.

B. Cultivate an innovative and expanding academic environment
Objective B.1: Develop new academic programs and offerings while enhancing
current academic programs.
 Goal B.1.3: Add new undergraduate programs to maintain a vibrant curriculum
and sustain undergraduate enrollment.
 Goal B.1.4: Develop new non-degree opportunities in continuing education,
professional, and corporate training.
 Goal B.1.5: Explore offering graduate instruction to working adults through
satellite sites.
 Goal B.3.2: Provide faculty with opportunities to advance innovation and engage
new and changing student populations.
 Goal B.3.5: Build and maintain strong Alliance community and regional
partnerships to enhance student educational experiences.
Objective B.4: Foster a global mindset and development of intercultural
competencies among members of the campus community.
 Goal B.4.1: Integrate the fostering of a global mindset and the development
of intercultural competencies into the curriculum
 Goal B.4.2: Implement learning objectives for each major that foster a global
mindset and the development of intercultural competencies.
 Goal B.4.4: Increase student, faculty, and administrator participation in activities
that support the development of intercultural competencies.
 Goal B.4.7: Provide intercultural professional development opportunities and
training in global education and intercultural competency for faculty.
 Goal B.4.8: Reward and recognize faculty and departmental efforts to
internationalize campus programs and the curriculum.
Objective B.5: Develop interdisciplinary academic centers.
 Goal B.5.1: Create new interdisciplinary academic Centers.
 Goal B.5.2: Establish a formal University Scholars program for each Center.

C. Ensure financial strength, affordability and enrollment success
Objective C.1: Diversify the University’s sources of tuition revenue.
 Goal C.2.1: Increase the enrollment of domestic diversity undergraduate students to 20% of the undergraduate student body.
 Goal C.2.2: Increase the enrollment of international students to 7% of the undergraduate student body.
 Goal C.5.2: Create a key performance indicators dashboard for campus constituents.
 Goal C.5.5: Seek collaborative relationships with educational institutions and
other non-profit organizations to reduce overhead and leverage our strengths.

D. Brand the University as a remarkable Midwestern institution
 Goal D.1.1: Revise the brand plan based on market research results, prioritizing
prospective student, parent, and current student input.

E. Create an effective and collaborative workplace culture
 Goal E.1.1: Continue efforts to study current and evolving issues of workplace
satisfaction, including regular and planned deployments of the Quality Culture
Explorer (QCE) and other similar instruments.
 Goal E.1.2: Take steps to improve workplace culture.
Objective E.6: Improve and support faculty and staff diversity.
 Goal E.6.3: Establish support systems for minority faculty and staff, capitalizing
on the existing offices/programs on campus to establish regular programs/
events on annual bases.


A copy of the strategic plan:
The website URL where the strategic plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have a published sustainability plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
Yes

A copy of the sustainability plan:
The website URL where the sustainability plan is publicly available:
---

Does the institution have a published climate action plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
Yes

A copy of the climate action plan:
The website URL where the climate action plan is publicly available:
---

Does the institution have other published plans that address sustainability or include measurable sustainability objectives (e.g. campus master plan, physical campus plan, diversity plan, human resources plan)? :
Yes

A list of other published plans that address sustainability, including public website URLs (if available):

Campus Master Plan
Emergency Management Plan


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Education and Engagement-Curriculum

This section proposes ways that Mount Union can expand and improve our formal educational programs and courses that address sustainability. A primary function of colleges and universities is to educate students. By training and educating future leaders, scholars, workers, and professionals, higher education institutions are positioned uniquely to prepare students to understand and address sustainability challenges. By offering courses and a curriculum that is relevant to sustainability issues we will help equip students to lead society to a sustainable future. This is clearly aligned with our University’s mission, “to prepare students for meaningful work, fulfilling lives, and responsible citizenship.”

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

We will continue to encourage faculty to identify where they are already incorporating sustainability in their courses. We suspect that sustainability is even more ingrained into our curriculum than is indicated by the statistics above. We will also propose measures that will make it easier to identify the ways that the University is addressing sustainability in its curriculum. The proposed revision of the General Education program will provide opportunities for including sustainability and much of our work will be geared towards helping faculty develop general education courses that will also include sustainability. We propose the following ideas for possible implementation:

1. We will continue researching assessment tools and conducting an assessment of students’ sustainability literacy and engagement upon entry and again at graduation. We will continue to work with the Office of Assessment and other faculty members to improve our efforts in this area.
2. Obtain sustainability related course offerings from other schools (syllabi, etc.) to help our faculty and perhaps provide a useful beginning point for creating additional sustainability courses in our curriculum.
3. Utilize AASHE resources to enable faculty to better develop courses related to sustainability
4. Work with instructors in the new general education program to support those who desire to incorporate sustainability education into their classes, perhaps utilizing stipends as encouragement.
5. Develop specific courses, a concentration, or certificate program in sustainability in Environmental Science, Engineering, Liberal Studies, or in more than one.
6. Continue to support and expand sustainability focused service learning activities.
7. Utilize Physical Plant staff in teaching moments- HVAC, electricity, and water consumption.
8. Develop a Theme cluster related to sustainability.
9. Develop one or more Capstone courses related to sustainability.
10. Develop and distribute a Campus Sustainability Map which points out campus sites that are utilizing ideas or projects related to sustainability.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Research?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Research and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Education and Engagement-Curriculum

This section proposes ways that Mount Union can expand and improve our formal educational programs and courses that address sustainability. A primary function of colleges and universities is to educate students. By training and educating future leaders, scholars, workers, and professionals, higher education institutions are positioned uniquely to prepare students to understand and address sustainability challenges. By offering courses and a curriculum that is relevant to sustainability issues we will help equip students to lead society to a sustainable future. This is clearly aligned with our University’s mission, “to prepare students for meaningful work, fulfilling lives, and responsible citizenship.”

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

We will continue to encourage faculty to identify where they are already incorporating sustainability in their courses. We suspect that sustainability is even more ingrained into our curriculum than is indicated by the statistics above. We will also propose measures that will make it easier to identify the ways that the University is addressing sustainability in its curriculum. The proposed revision of the General Education program will provide opportunities for including sustainability and much of our work will be geared towards helping faculty develop general education courses that will also include sustainability. We propose the following ideas for possible implementation:

1. We will continue researching assessment tools and conducting an assessment of students’ sustainability literacy and engagement upon entry and again at graduation. We will continue to work with the Office of Assessment and other faculty members to improve our efforts in this area.
2. Obtain sustainability related course offerings from other schools (syllabi, etc.) to help our faculty and perhaps provide a useful beginning point for creating additional sustainability courses in our curriculum.
3. Utilize AASHE resources to enable faculty to better develop courses related to sustainability
4. Work with instructors in the new general education program to support those who desire to incorporate sustainability education into their classes, perhaps utilizing stipends as encouragement.
5. Develop specific courses, a concentration, or certificate program in sustainability in Environmental Science, Engineering, Liberal Studies, or in more than one.
6. Continue to support and expand sustainability focused service learning activities.
7. Utilize Physical Plant staff in teaching moments- HVAC, electricity, and water consumption.
8. Develop a Theme cluster related to sustainability.
9. Develop one or more Capstone courses related to sustainability.
10. Develop and distribute a Campus Sustainability Map which points out campus sites that are utilizing ideas or projects related to sustainability.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Education and Engagement-Co-Curricular Education

Education in this context is broadly defined to include our academic curriculum, our professional development programs for faculty and staff, and our community outreach programs.

Goals

1. Increase all stakeholders’ (students, staff, faculty, alumni, board of trustees, and surrounding community) awareness of sustainability.
2. Increase motivation and willingness to act in a sustainable manner.
3. Encourage behavioral change in students and employees.
4. Build sustainability into the social fabric of the campus including housing, student activities, and business office.
5. Involve students in monitoring our campus by collecting data, analyzing it, and sharing it with the campus and beyond.
6. Promote the campus’ sustainability goals and offer rewards for improvements.

Co-Curricular Education

Vision

This co-curricular section proposes ways that Mount Union can provide our students with sustainability learning experiences outside the formal curriculum. Engaging in sustainability through co-curricular activities allows student to deepen and apply their understandings of sustainability principles. University sponsored co-curricular sustainability offerings, possibly coordinated by the office of student affairs and student organizations, could help to integrate sustainability into the campus culture and set a positive tone for the institution.

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

Our overall goal is to support student groups and campus offices to encourage sponsorship of activities and events for students and dissemination of sustainability concepts. Some details follow:

1. We have continued our involvement in RecycleMania and we propose to continue that. Our overall recycling rates have increased, but we can increase them further. We need to begin planning earlier and get more students involved in the program as well as increase the number of activities surrounding the event.
2. We will work with Student Senate and seek to have a designated representative on the SMAC. We will ask Student Senate to designate a student to serve as a liaison between SMAC and the Student Senate. The student would be a full member of SMAC.
3. We will continue developing and attempting to implement the Green Raider program. We will assess the results of this program each year and work to develop the program based on input from students, faculty, and staff. As part of this program we continue some competitions for sustainable living practices among residence units. We would also work with Student Affairs to promote working sustainability principles and concepts into residence hall educational programs and activities.
4. We will investigate the possibility of creating a “model” residence hall room, apartment, or small house that would display sustainable living practices and green design. We would seek outside funding for this and also involve engineering majors, as well as other students, in the design and monitoring of the unit.
5. Work with Greek Life to create a sustainability outreach activity or event, perhaps co-sponsored by several organizations. This event could also take the form of a competition.
6. Continue periodic “tray less days” in the cafeteria along with publicity about the results.
7. Continue some type of sustainability presentation for entering freshmen in Orientation
8. Incorporate Sustainability into Raider Guide Tours with the introduction of a Campus Sustainability Map.
9. Work with career services to provide information on jobs and internships that are available in sustainability-related career fields.
10. Expand support for student organizations that are focused on different aspects of sustainability.
11. Develop and implement presentations about different aspects of sustainability to various organizations and residence halls on campus. These would be done by the Green Raiders primarily.
12. The Green Raiders will make regular reports to Student Senate about issues related to sustainability on campus.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Planning and Administration - Community Relations and Partnerships

Mount Union has a strong tradition of positive involvement with our community. We work in many ways to give back to our community through community service, engagement and partnerships. Volunteerism and the sense of compassion that community service helps develop are fundamental to achieving sustainability. Students have made tangible contributions that address sustainability challenges through community service in numerous ways. In addition, community engagement can help students develop leadership skills while deepening their understandings of practical, real-world problems. Institutions can contribute to their communities by harnessing their financial and academic resources to address community needs.

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond
1. Maintain and expand the programs above that will continue strong community relations
2. Continue involvement with the Ohio Solar Tour
3. Continue organizing and sponsoring the end of the year Trash to Treasure sale
4. Continue to keep sustainability education at the forefront of our efforts.
5. Work with the Alliance Green Commission to develop complimentary Campus and Community Resiliency Plans.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Climate Action Plan Goal - Become carbon neutral by 2046

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Energy and Climate

University of Mount Union will reduce its energy consumption through conservation and efficiency, and by switching to cleaner and renewable sources of energy such as solar, wind, geothermal, and low-impact hydropower. At Mount Union, energy consumption is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. In addition to accelerating climate change, energy generation from fossil fuels, especially coal, produces air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, mercury, dioxins, arsenic, cadmium, and lead. These pollutants contribute to acid rain as well as health problems such as heart and respiratory diseases and cancer. Coal mining and oil/gas drilling can also damage environmentally and/or culturally significant ecosystems. Nuclear power creates highly toxic and long-lasting radioactive waste. Large-scale hydropower floods habitats and disrupts fish migration.

Implementing conservation measures and switching to renewable sources of energy can help Mount Union save money and protect us from potential utility rate volatility. Renewable energy may be generated locally or regionally and allow us to support local economic development. Furthermore, we can help shape markets by creating demand for cleaner, renewable sources of energy.

In 2016 we signed a 5-year contract to purchase green energy. Also, in 2016 a Green Revolving Fund, funded initially by the EnerNoc participation dollars, was approved by the Board of Trustees and the first series of projects (totaling no more than $50,000 with a 5 year ROI) was recommended for approval. In 2015 energy audits were conducted by Plug-Smart in Bracy Hall and Miller Residence Hall. Numerous energy saving projects were suggested, many of which will be included in the Green Revolving Fund Projects.

Actions - Ongoing

Below are policies and procedures that Mount Union will continue to expand. Many of these are developed further below or in other parts of this plan.

1. Continue to replace boilers, chillers, and air handlers with more energy efficient systems.
2. Replace old electric transformers.
3. Use renewable energy sources.
4. Complete individual electric metering of all buildings on campus and continue monitoring utility usage of each building.
5. Install timers and lighting controls in all campus buildings and elsewhere, as appropriate.
6. Attend informational seminars to increase our knowledge of sustainable best practices.
7. Build to LEED Silver specifications in all new and renovated buildings.
8. Educate students, faculty, and staff on energy conservation practices.
9. Upgrade building temperature controls to improve operating efficiency.
10. Continue to conduct energy audits, possibly at several levels (one overall audit for the campus and specific audits for energy consuming systems, like air handlers).

Actions
2016 and beyond

1. Continue to initiate energy conservation policies
a. Conservation is the first priority for energy management in our plan. This will focus primarily on behavior modification of campus members and improved monitoring and response (overlap with education/administration).
i. Formalize “lights and computer off at night” policy.
ii. Work with IT so that only Energy Star computers and peripherals are purchased and other energy conservation measures are initiated. Other examples include sleep modes or software on equipment, server space reduction through new server virtualization or other technology, and paper monitoring and reduction.
iii. Educate students and initiate energy conservation competitions for students.
iv. Initiate energy conservation competitions or incentives for campus departments.
v. Maintain our emphasis on energy conservation, with periodic review and assessment of executed actions.
2. Increase efficiency in existing and new buildings and activities
a. Continue to conduct energy audits focusing first on known energy consumers and then on a more general, campus-wide basis.
i. Evaluate opportunities for waste-heat recapture.
ii. Evaluate use of ground heat pumps throughout campus.
iii. Evaluate the feasibility/sustainability of district heating or co-generation.
b. Continue retrofitting existing buildings by upgrading windows and lighting systems.
c. When roofs need replaced, replace them with reflective or planted “green” roofs.
d. Make adjustments to the existing HVAC system as recommended.
e. Install motion/light sensors in all facilities.
f. Initiate a “green” student residence showcasing efficiency.
g. Explore working towards meeting the Architecture 2030 Challenge. The Challenge asks the global architecture and building community to adopt the following targets:
i. All new buildings, developments, and major renovations shall be designed to meet a fossil fuel, GHG-emitting, energy consumption performance standard of 50% of the regional (or country) average for that building type.
ii. At a minimum, an equal amount of existing building area shall be renovated annually to meet a fossil fuel, GHG-emitting energy consumption performance standards of 50% of the regional (or country) average for that building type.
iii. The fossil fuel reduction standard for all new buildings and major renovations shall be increased to:
1. 60% in 2010
2. 70% in 2015
3. 80% in 2020
4. 90% in 2025
5. Carbon neutral in 2030 (using no fossil fuel, GHG-emitting energy to operate). These targets may be accomplished by implementing innovative sustainable design strategies, generating on-site renewable power and/or purchasing (20% maximum) renewable energy and/or certified renewable energy credits.
3. On-Site Energy Production
a. We currently have a 1 kW photovoltaic (PV) array on the roof of the Hoover-Price Campus Center and a 54 kW thin-film PV system on the roof of the Peterson Field House.
i. Install a wind turbine at the Huston-Brumbaugh Nature Center.
ii. Investigate the installation of solar-thermal for residences, the pool, and locker rooms.
iii. Investigate the use of geothermal throughout campus (Gartner Welcome Center (LEED Silver), operates on geothermal.
iv. Collect energy from exercise equipment as part of student education.
4. Off-site Alternative Energy
a. Investigate opportunities for regional alternative energy sources.
b. Investigate opportunities for collaborative regional facilities (i.e. wind on Lake Erie in conjunction with other institutions).
c. Investigate options for regional biomass facilities.
5. Offset and Credits
a. Offsets and credits will likely be a part of our portfolio, but we view them as the last resort after we have achieved a high level of energy conservation, efficiency, and local generation of renewable energy. With the exception of air travel, described in the section on transportation, we will defer purchasing credits in the short term. Some of the questions that we need to answer are:
i. Besides air travel, what other areas will require offsets?
ii. Do renewable energy credits make sense economically?
iii. Will the purchase of credits change behavior?
iv. Does the purchase of credits put people to work locally or does it eliminate local jobs?
v. Study the availability and cost of credits.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Buildings

University of Mount Union desires to maintain and renovate existing buildings and construct new buildings that reflect the best available sustainability practices so as to create healthy environments for users of the buildings and reduce operating costs. At University of Mount Union, buildings are by far the largest users of energy and the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions on campus. Buildings also use significant amounts of potable water. University of Mount Union will therefore design, build, and maintain buildings in ways that provide a safe and healthy indoor environment for inhabitants while simultaneously mitigating the building’s impact on the outdoor environment.

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

1. Continue to convert all lighting to LED campus-wide (interior and exterior).
2. Continue to upgrade roofs, windows, and walls in existing buildings.
3. Meter all sports facilities and future facilities.
4. Create an online dashboard that compares metered information for all campus residence halls, apartments, and townhouses and includes comparisons to other institutions of similar size and scope.
5. Review and reconsider temperature standards for working spaces (currently 72°F (+/- 2°) year round).
6. Develop a green cleaning policy in conformance with Green Seal certification.
7. Improve the Building Coordinator role on campus to encourage sustainable practices.
8. Implement or expand programs in residential housing to promote sustainable living practices. These could be high-efficiency lighting give-a-ways, floor competitions, vending misers on vending machines, and installing high efficiency washers/dryers.
9. Install individual room sensors and controllers in residence halls and other buildings as appropriate.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Energy and Climate

University of Mount Union will reduce its energy consumption through conservation and efficiency, and by switching to cleaner and renewable sources of energy such as solar, wind, geothermal, and low-impact hydropower. At Mount Union, energy consumption is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. In addition to accelerating climate change, energy generation from fossil fuels, especially coal, produces air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, mercury, dioxins, arsenic, cadmium, and lead. These pollutants contribute to acid rain as well as health problems such as heart and respiratory diseases and cancer. Coal mining and oil/gas drilling can also damage environmentally and/or culturally significant ecosystems. Nuclear power creates highly toxic and long-lasting radioactive waste. Large-scale hydropower floods habitats and disrupts fish migration.

Implementing conservation measures and switching to renewable sources of energy can help Mount Union save money and protect us from potential utility rate volatility. Renewable energy may be generated locally or regionally and allow us to support local economic development. Furthermore, we can help shape markets by creating demand for cleaner, renewable sources of energy.

In 2016 we signed a 5-year contract to purchase green energy. Also, in 2016 a Green Revolving Fund, funded initially by the EnerNoc participation dollars, was approved by the Board of Trustees and the first series of projects (totaling no more than $50,000 with a 5 year ROI) was recommended for approval. In 2015 energy audits were conducted by Plug-Smart in Bracy Hall and Miller Residence Hall. Numerous energy saving projects were suggested, many of which will be included in the Green Revolving Fund Projects.

Actions - Ongoing

Below are policies and procedures that Mount Union will continue to expand. Many of these are developed further below or in other parts of this plan.

1. Continue to replace boilers, chillers, and air handlers with more energy efficient systems.
2. Replace old electric transformers.
3. Use renewable energy sources.
4. Complete individual electric metering of all buildings on campus and continue monitoring utility usage of each building.
5. Install timers and lighting controls in all campus buildings and elsewhere, as appropriate.
6. Attend informational seminars to increase our knowledge of sustainable best practices.
7. Build to LEED Silver specifications in all new and renovated buildings.
8. Educate students, faculty, and staff on energy conservation practices.
9. Upgrade building temperature controls to improve operating efficiency.
10. Continue to conduct energy audits, possibly at several levels (one overall audit for the campus and specific audits for energy consuming systems, like air handlers).

Actions
2016 and beyond

1. Continue to initiate energy conservation policies
a. Conservation is the first priority for energy management in our plan. This will focus primarily on behavior modification of campus members and improved monitoring and response (overlap with education/administration).
i. Formalize “lights and computer off at night” policy.
ii. Work with IT so that only Energy Star computers and peripherals are purchased and other energy conservation measures are initiated. Other examples include sleep modes or software on equipment, server space reduction through new server virtualization or other technology, and paper monitoring and reduction.
iii. Educate students and initiate energy conservation competitions for students.
iv. Initiate energy conservation competitions or incentives for campus departments.
v. Maintain our emphasis on energy conservation, with periodic review and assessment of executed actions.
2. Increase efficiency in existing and new buildings and activities
a. Continue to conduct energy audits focusing first on known energy consumers and then on a more general, campus-wide basis.
i. Evaluate opportunities for waste-heat recapture.
ii. Evaluate use of ground heat pumps throughout campus.
iii. Evaluate the feasibility/sustainability of district heating or co-generation.
b. Continue retrofitting existing buildings by upgrading windows and lighting systems.
c. When roofs need replaced, replace them with reflective or planted “green” roofs.
d. Make adjustments to the existing HVAC system as recommended.
e. Install motion/light sensors in all facilities.
f. Initiate a “green” student residence showcasing efficiency.
g. Explore working towards meeting the Architecture 2030 Challenge. The Challenge asks the global architecture and building community to adopt the following targets:
i. All new buildings, developments, and major renovations shall be designed to meet a fossil fuel, GHG-emitting, energy consumption performance standard of 50% of the regional (or country) average for that building type.
ii. At a minimum, an equal amount of existing building area shall be renovated annually to meet a fossil fuel, GHG-emitting energy consumption performance standards of 50% of the regional (or country) average for that building type.
iii. The fossil fuel reduction standard for all new buildings and major renovations shall be increased to:
1. 60% in 2010
2. 70% in 2015
3. 80% in 2020
4. 90% in 2025
5. Carbon neutral in 2030 (using no fossil fuel, GHG-emitting energy to operate). These targets may be accomplished by implementing innovative sustainable design strategies, generating on-site renewable power and/or purchasing (20% maximum) renewable energy and/or certified renewable energy credits.
3. On-Site Energy Production
a. We currently have a 1 kW photovoltaic (PV) array on the roof of the Hoover-Price Campus Center and a 54 kW thin-film PV system on the roof of the Peterson Field House.
i. Install a wind turbine at the Huston-Brumbaugh Nature Center.
ii. Investigate the installation of solar-thermal for residences, the pool, and locker rooms.
iii. Investigate the use of geothermal throughout campus (Gartner Welcome Center (LEED Silver), operates on geothermal.
iv. Collect energy from exercise equipment as part of student education.
4. Off-site Alternative Energy
a. Investigate opportunities for regional alternative energy sources.
b. Investigate opportunities for collaborative regional facilities (i.e. wind on Lake Erie in conjunction with other institutions).
c. Investigate options for regional biomass facilities.
5. Offset and Credits
a. Offsets and credits will likely be a part of our portfolio, but we view them as the last resort after we have achieved a high level of energy conservation, efficiency, and local generation of renewable energy. With the exception of air travel, described in the section on transportation, we will defer purchasing credits in the short term. Some of the questions that we need to answer are:
i. Besides air travel, what other areas will require offsets?
ii. Do renewable energy credits make sense economically?
iii. Will the purchase of credits change behavior?
iv. Does the purchase of credits put people to work locally or does it eliminate local jobs?
v. Study the availability and cost of credits.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Dining Services

University of Mount Union wants to provide, through its food service contractor (currently AVI), a high quality of healthy food in ways that minimize waste, support local purchasing, and include organic and fair trade certified products. We want to minimize waste in the energy required for food storage and preparation and minimize waste of food and production of solid waste.

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

1. Continue to educate the campus community on food waste.
2. Continue to evaluate bio-digesters, composters, or pulpers for dining hall food waste.
a. Utilize Engineering Department
3. Consider blackouts of selected parts of the dining commons.
4. Continue to monitor dish machine use to maximize efficiency.
5. Revisit tray less dining.
6. Increase the amount of locally produced food we offer.
7. Review and increase the purchase of fair-trade and organic foods.
8. Implement zero waste meals. All waste should be biodegradable and none should be going to the land fill.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Grounds

University of Mount Union is proud of its beautiful and welcoming campus. We propose to continue to maintain our campus in a regionally appropriate manner that will use water wisely and minimize the use of harmful landscape chemicals.

Our campus is 135 acres in a small city (population approximately 22,000) setting.
University of Mount Union uses limited amounts of fertilizers and pesticides in the care and maintenance of our grounds. We responsibly manage all applications to minimize the risk of environmental damage. We plant and maintain many local species of native plants in our landscaping areas. We have an inventory of our trees, including recommendation for care. We have received the Tree Campus USA certification since 2010. Our trees are part of the city-wide arboretum. When trees need to be removed, those appropriate are sent to be milled and used for on-campus furniture or sold to the mill for use in blocking containers and pallets. Those trees not appropriate for milling are sent to a local lawn care company which makes them into mulch.

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

1. Continue to update our tree inventory annually
2. Determine areas that could be shifted into lower maintenance plantings with more native, drought tolerant plants, which would result in less watering.
3. Review our grounds-related chemical use to determine ways to further reduce it.
4. Evaluate use of more environmentally-friendly products for snow/ice removal.
5. Look at ways to use landscaping to improve building heating and cooling and minimize the need for mowing and the use of chemicals and fertilizers, all as part of our campus master plan.
6. Investigate the possibility of utilizing water from our university ponds for any needed irrigation.
7. Create educational gardens on campus, including agricultural, native plants, and rain gardens.
8. Implement more solar-powered landscape lighting to reduce our electric costs.
9. Support students in the Engineering Department on their work to design and build a bio-digester that will utilize waste materials from our grounds and dining service, removing it from the landfill
10. Investigate becoming a Bee Campus USA designee by having a pollinator-friendly campus.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Purchasing

Mount Union desires to use our purchasing power to help build a sustainable economy, especially focused on our own state and region. Our institution purchases millions of dollars of goods and services every year. Each purchasing delegation represents an opportunity for us to choose environmentally and socially preferable products and services and support companies with strong commitments to sustainability.

University of Mount Union adopted a Green - Sustainable Purchasing Policy in 2008 that continues today.

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

Most of the purchasing actions involve initial commitments that have already been made and continual follow up and refinement. Purchasing wants to continue to expand the current purchasing policy to an even more sustainable purchasing policy that encompasses such things as materials and supplies, utilization of companies that promote sustainability, local suppliers (within 250 miles), recyclable shipping containers, and Minority and Women owned businesses.

1. Increase our emphasis on the purchasing of local or regional products.
2. Continue our policy of only purchasing Energy Star appliances where such designations are available.
3. Include explicit sustainability specifications in requests for proposals.
4. Adopt an electronics purchasing policy similar to EPEAT. EPEAT is a system that helps purchasers evaluate, compare, and select electronic products based on their environmental attributes. The system currently covers desktop and laptop computers, thin clients, workstations, and computer monitors (http://www.epeat.net/default.aspx).
5. Adopt a paper purchasing policy that will lead us to purchase paper that is made from environmentally preferable materials, maximizing recycled content and using Forest Stewardship Council approved products from virgin fiber (http://fsc.org/index.html).
6. Adopt a furniture purchasing policy that will lead us to purchase furniture that is made of environmentally preferable materials.
7. Adopt a policy that will encourage use of recycled or waste-avoided materials such as paint or upholstery whenever possible.
8. Adopt a cleaning product policy similar to Green Seal. Green Seal provides science-based environmental certification standards that are credible, transparent, and essential in an increasingly educated and competitive marketplace (http://www.greenseal.org).
9. Adopt a vendor code of conduct for our major suppliers.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Transportation

Mount Union recognizes that transportation is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants that contribute to health problems, including heart and respiratory diseases and cancer. Because of our relatively small size and compact campus, our fleet emissions are relatively small. We can reap benefits from implementing sustainable changes to our transportation systems. Bicycling and walking provide human health benefits and mitigate the need for large paved surfaces, which can help campuses better manage storm water. Also, we can realize cost savings that help support local economies by reducing our dependency on petroleum-based fuels for transportation.

Actions/Objectives
2016-2020

1. Implement a bike trail through campus to connect to the Iron Horse Trail (work with Alliance City Green Commission)
2. Continue to improve the use of local public transportation by working with SARTA to offer reduced price passes to students, staff, and faculty.
3. Try to reduce student transportation energy use and associated emissions by establishing a “ride share” system.
4. Try to improve faculty and staff transportation efficiency by providing desirable, dedicated carpool parking spaces or offering carpool incentives.
5. Reduce fleet emissions by purchasing hybrid or other high efficiency, low emissions vehicles.
6. Replace aging gas powered grounds crew golf carts with electric models to reduce emissions and dependency on fossil fuels.
7. Investigate the need for and cost of parking spaces dedicated to electric only vehicles, including charging stations.
8. Build bins at the Physical Plant for topsoil, mulch, and compost to reduce off campus trips and increase efficiency for small landscape projects.
9. Provide incentives for train or bus travel rather than air travel.
10. Continue to work with the Alliance Mayor’s Green Commission in support of “Fuel-less Fridays”

2020 and beyond

1. Get more detailed records on the nature of our air travel and calculate the emission associated with that more accurately.
2. Study alternatives for air travel offsets.
3. Analyze the budgetary implications of offsets and establish a policy for offsets related to air travel.
4. Continue to replace existing campus automobiles with hybrid or electric, or the currently best available technology. Replacement of vans and trucks will depend on the available of technology. But in any case, we will consider fuel efficiency and level of emissions in selecting replacement vehicles.
5. Require the purchase of offsets for air travel.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Materials Recycling and Waste

Mount Union intends to move towards zero waste by reducing, reusing, recycling, and composting. These actions mitigate the need to extract virgin materials such as trees and metals. It generally takes less energy to make a product with recycled material than with virgin resources. Reducing waste generation also reduces the flow of waste to incinerators and landfills, which produce greenhouse gas emissions, can contaminate air and groundwater supplies, and tend to have disproportionate negative impacts on low-income communities. In addition, waste reduction campaigns can engage the entire campus community in contributing to our sustainability goals.

Actions/Objectives
2016-2020

1. Continue to participate in RecycleMania or other campus-wide waste awareness and reduction activities.
2. Increase our marketing and awareness campaigns for campus-wide recycling. Add more signage on campus to make students aware of the benefits of recycling and the consequences of not recycling.
3. Encourage more recycling during campus tailgating to eliminate cans, bottles, and plastic containers in the trash.
4. Add more exterior recycling bins and improve the accessibility of the existing bins
5. Continue to consolidate recycling and trash collection in the academic buildings to the hallways (eliminate bins in individual classrooms and place larger bins in the hallways). This has been completed in Chapman Hall and KHIC.
6. Continue to pursue composting.
7. Plan some zero waste events for the campus through such companies as Terracycle.
8. Achieve a 35% diversion rate for solid waste.
9. Adopt a policy of diverting at least 75% of non-hazardous construction waste from landfills or incinerators.
10. Expand our e-waste program to cover the recycling and reuse of donated items, such as office machines and student computers that are not covered under our current policy.

2020 and beyond

1. Achieve a 50% diversion rate for solid waste
2. Implement a plan for moving to zero waste across campus.
3. Monitor our success at zero waste and develop new plans as technologies change with the intention of achieving overall zero waste by our target year of 2046.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Water?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Water and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Operations-Grounds

University of Mount Union is proud of its beautiful and welcoming campus. We propose to continue to maintain our campus in a regionally appropriate manner that will use water wisely and minimize the use of harmful landscape chemicals.

History (updated through March 2016)

Our campus is 135 acres in a small city (population approximately 22,000) setting.

University of Mount Union uses limited amounts of fertilizers and pesticides in the care and maintenance of our grounds. We responsibly manage all applications to minimize the risk of environmental damage. We plant and maintain many local species of native plants in our landscaping areas. We have an inventory of our trees, including recommendation for care. We have received the Tree Campus USA certification since 2010. Our trees are part of the city-wide arboretum. When trees need to be removed, those appropriate are sent to be milled and used for on-campus furniture or sold to the mill for use in blocking containers and pallets. Those trees not appropriate for milling are sent to a local lawn care company which makes them into mulch.

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

1. Determine areas that could be shifted into lower maintenance plantings with more native, drought tolerant plants, which would result in less watering.
2. Review our grounds-related chemical use to determine ways to further reduce it.
3. Evaluate use of more environmentally-friendly products for snow/ice removal.
4. Investigate the possibility of utilizing water from our university ponds for any needed irrigation.
5. Create educational gardens on campus, including agricultural, native plants, and rain gardens.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Strategic Plan - Compass 2021

A. Enrich the experience of an increasingly diverse student body
Objective A.1: Foster an inclusive culture that is focused on and values diversity.
 Goal A.1.1: Implement programs that foster interfaith understanding.
 Goal A.1.2: Provide appropriate spaces for religious and spiritual observance of
diverse faith traditions.
 Goal A.1.3: Develop gender-inclusive campus initiatives.
 Goal A.1.4: Increase offerings and campus engagement in diversity
programming.
Objective A.2: Provide programs and support services for our evolving student body.
 Goal A.2.1: Improve services and support systems for transfer students.
 Goal A.2.2: Improve services and support systems for commuter students.
 Goal A.2.3: Develop services, support systems, and processes to meet the needs
of graduate students.
 Goal A.2.4: Foster an inclusive and supportive environment for international
students.
 Goal A.2.5: Enhance internship and career opportunities for students by
fostering cooperation between academic departments and career services,
and by improving services to and support for employers who can provide
experiential learning opportunities.
 Goal A.2.6: Enhance facilities for intercollegiate athletics to ensure safe and
high-quality spaces for practice and competition.
 Goal A.2.7: Study and change space usage in KHIC to maximize support and
learning spaces for students, faculty, and administrators.
Objective A.3: Strengthen student success and engagement initiatives.
 Goal A.3.1: Research, develop and implement an updated academic advising
model.
 Goal A.3.2: Create an updated plan for retention.
 Goal A.3.3: Explore innovative student support and success initiatives.
 Goal A.3.4: Create intentional ways to help students understand connections
and strengthen alignment between their curricular and co-curricular education.
 Goal A.3.5: Improve campus programming for increased student engagement.

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Planning and Administration-Diversity, Access, and Affordability

Mount Union desires to advance diversity, access, and affordability both on campus and in society at large. In order to build a sustainable society, diverse groups will need to be able to come together and work collaboratively to address sustainability challenges. People of color and low-income communities tend to suffer disproportionate exposure to environmental problems. This environmental injustice happens as a result of unequal and segregated communities. To achieve environmental justice, society must work to address discrimination and promote equality. Higher education opens doors to opportunities that can help create a more equitable world. The historical legacy and persistence of discrimination based on racial, gender, religious, and other differences makes a proactive approach to promoting a culture of inclusiveness an important component of creating an equitable society. In addition, a diverse student body, faculty, and staff provides rich resources for learning and collaboration.

University of Mount Union has a Diversity Initiatives Steering Committee (DISC) that works to foster increased diversity on campus. As a subcommittee of the Faculty’s Cross Curricular Development Committee, DISC has the responsibility to recommend and propose policies concerning campus-wide efforts in the areas of:

1. Developing an inclusive curriculum
2. Tracking and evaluating diversity programs implemented at the University and assessing the campus climate for diversity
3. Supporting the efforts of appropriate offices at the University in the creation and maintenance of a diverse student body and a diverse faculty.

The University completed an assessment of diversity attitudes in 2009 and it was analyzed by the Diversity Initiatives Steering Committee (DISC). The assessment showed students are generally satisfied with overall campus diversity, but somewhat reluctant to take a lead in diversity initiatives or enroll in diversity focused coursework. DISC recommended a number of items to the President, including:

1. A strategic initiative be implemented that specifically aims to promote a campus message communicating the definition of diversity. The content of this message would encourage the understanding and discussion of diversity in its many aspects in the classroom.
2. Further research on activities in and out of the classroom that encourage ‘socialized diversity,’ the using of unstructured activities in addition to the curriculum to promote diversity.
3. A workshop be created for the faculty fall conference on how to interject issues of diversity into individual course curriculum.
4. Collaborations among faculty and staff to get each student some kind of positive, growth experience with people different from themselves.
Adapted from the Diversity Initiatives Steering Committee AY08-09 Report

In addition, to keep diversity issues at the forefront, the Office of Multicultural Affairs in the Division of Student Affairs was transitioned to the Office of Diversity & Inclusion to advocate for, coordinate, support, and encourage innovation in university programming and student organizations that are designed to enhance diversity. In 2014, responsibility for International Student Services was moved under this umbrella to put all diversity groups in the same administrative area, thereby enhancing their ability to co-program and support each other as they work toward similar goals.

We have well-developed programs to serve international student and students from groups that are underrepresented on our campus. For international students, the International Student Services Office coordinates various cultural and educational programs for University of Mount Union students. Most notable are the International Teas that given international students the opportunity to share about their home country. Presentations are generally given three times per semester and the events include food from the specific country being discussed. The International Student Services Office also coordinates activities for International Education Week.

International students are given the opportunity to be matched with individuals in the greater Alliance community through the Community Friend Program. This program is a friendship based program and not a host program. International students and Community Friends are encouraged to communicate and share about their respective cultures. In addition, numerous cultural excursions are offered to the international student body and regularly scheduled shopping trips are arranged for students to purchase basic personal needs items from the local Wal-Mart.

Through the Office of Diversity & Inclusion there are dozens of educational, cultural, and social activities available throughout the year, including speakers, conferences, and awards. The following are goals from the most recently completed Strategic Plan that were met by the time of the Plan’s expiration.
• Increase international/minority population to 15% of total student body
• Change name from Multicultural Student Affairs to Diversity & Inclusion
o BSU House also changed to Diversity Center
• Continue to grow the annual Not Another Statistic Diversity Conference
Additional Accomplishments:
• Diversity Council creation (2012)
• Groups include: SPECTRUM (formerly Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA)), Hispanic Organization Latino Students (HOLA), Black Student Union (BSU), Association of International Students (AIS), Spiritual Life Leadership (SLL), Gender Equality Matters (GEM) (formerly Association of Women Students (AWS))

Actions/Objectives
2016 & Beyond

1. Increase faculty participation in Not Another Statistic Diversity Conference (NASDC), both in terms of presentations and attendance. This could be incentivized via a Wellness program credit; other incentives need to be developed.
2. Provide diversity/social justice training for faculty and staff to create a more welcoming, inclusive environment for our diverse students and to better model inclusive attitudes to our non-diverse students. This training will be pursued by the following means:
a. A faculty/staff track at the NASDC that trains attendees on gender inclusivity and/or how to support Muslim students (These are two currently growing needs.)
b. Training at May Days facilitated by DISC
c. Training at Fall Faculty Conference facilitated by an external entity and sponsored by DISC
d. Training series throughout the year provided by the International Student Services Team, a newly created group tasked with preparing our campus to host a large influx of international students from countries that have been underrepresented on campus prior to now (ex: Saudi Arabia, India, China)
3. Diversify the curriculum through DISC initiative that grants seed money on an application-basis to faculty seeking to infuse diversity topics/experience into a particular class. This initiative will begin in April 2016.
4. Build relationships between Diversity & Inclusion, DISC , and the Office of Admission so that diversity officers are more directly involved with the following:
• Minority Achievement Award Competition
• Development of new or different scholarship opportunities
• Revamping Multicultural Recruitment Coordinator position to encourage hiring of a Spanish-speaker in the Office of Admission
• Converting the admission process to gender inclusivity via language changes in written materials and verbal expression of this value in tours and meetings with reps
5. Create a prayer space for religiously diverse students.
6. Develop a communication plan for deposit-paid international students in cooperation with relevant Student Affairs offices and the Office of Marketing.
7. Create & maintain programs in support of diverse students and to educate majority students
• Focus area: TIE (Together Initiating Excellence) – increase frequency from monthly and connect it to existing programs with area high school students such as Great Expectations or Dowling Mentors
8. Formalize the Manzilla Diversity Intern process to provide more equal opportunity for students to be aware of this opportunity and for offices to propose a position.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Planning and Administration-Investments

University of Mount Union can make investment decisions that promote sustainability. Most institutions invest some of their assets in order to generate income. Together, colleges and universities invest hundreds of billions of dollars. Schools with transparent and democratic investment processes promote accountability and community engagement. Furthermore, institutions can support the development of sustainable products and services by investing in these industries. Likewise, they can support sustainability by investing in companies and funds that, in addition to providing a strong rate of return, are committed to social and environmental responsibility. Finally, campuses can engage with the businesses in which they are invested in order to promote sustainable practices.

Mount Union has developed a healthy endowment over the last few decades that contributes importantly to the success of our institution. Our Board of Trustees works together with our administration to set guidelines for investments and the investments are managed by professional investment managers. Currently our specific investments are not public knowledge.

Mount Union is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Their guidelines list some specific social issues that should be avoided and make a more general admonition to choose investments that conform to these social principles:

1. An ecologically just world and a better quality of life for all creation
2. Social justice and the sacred worth of all persons
3. Sound fiscal policies that protect the economic life of all individuals
4. Political and governmental responsibility for protection of basic rights
5. The unity of the world community

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

1. The investment committee of the board of trustees reviewed several candidates for endowment consulting. One of the criteria was knowledge in socially responsible investing. We decided to maintain the relationship with our current firm and will be studying how to implement sustainability principles into the investments at Mount Union.
2. Once the trustees have advised as to how sustainable investing fits into the overall portfolio of investments consideration will be given to establish a socially responsible advisory committee to oversee investments. This advisory committee would include trustees, faculty, students, and staff (up to 9). Their duties could include:
a. Monitoring voter proxies
b. Monitoring performance
c. Shareholder advocacy
3. In 2016 a Green Revolving Fund was established, which is an internal fund to cycle back savings from energy efficiency improvements to fund new projects in the future. The establishment of this fund is an indicator of the University’s strong commitment to sustainability. This fund establishes a sustainable funding mechanism while reducing operating costs and environmental impacts. The anticipation for this fund is that it will engage the entire campus community in proposing energy efficiency projects and address the established goals of the Sustainability Management Advisory Committee (SMAC). The focus of the fund is renewable energy, water conservation, and energy consumption projects. The fund requires that all projects have a measurable Return on Investment (ROI) of 5 years or less to reinvest for future projects. All project ideas must be submitted to SMAC. SMAC and the Physical Plant Committee will review all project ideas and select those projects that will be funded. The project ideas must include the upfront cost, not to exceed $50,000, and provide evidence of at least a 20% payback each year after execution (5 year ROI). The Revolving Green Fund is also an option for donors. Therefore, anyone with a passion for renewable energy and sustainability can make a direct donation to support campus projects.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Taken from the Sustainability Plan
Planning and Administration-Human Resources

University of Mount Union desires to treat and remunerate its workers responsibly and fairly. Mount Union’s people define its character and capacity to perform. Our success as an institution can only be as strong as the community that we build and maintain. Mount Union will bolster the strength of its community by making fair and responsible investments in its human capital. Such investments include offering benefits, wages, and other assistance that serve to respectfully and ethically compensate workers. Investment in human resources is integral to the achievement of a healthy and sustainable balance between human capital, natural capital, and financial capital.

Actions/Objectives
2016 and beyond

1. The University continues to provide a wellness program, called Healthy Campus, for employees and access to a state-of-the-art fitness center. The fitness center offers many fitness and recreation programs in which employees can participate. In addition, exercise science students offer personal training opportunities for employees. Work will continue through our Human Resources office to educate our employees about sustainable practices at home and at work.
a. Biometric screenings are offered annually for all faculty and staff to obtain a health risk assessment.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas (e.g. arts and culture or technology)?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas and the published plans in which each objective is included:
---

Does the institution have a formal statement in support of sustainability endorsed by its governing body (e.g. a mission statement that specifically includes sustainability and is endorsed by the Board of Trustees)? :
No

The formal statement in support of sustainability:
---

The institution’s definition of sustainability (e.g. as included in a published statement or plan):

FROM OUR Sustainability Mission statement:
Sustainabilty means that we operate our institution in a manner that is:
"socially, financially, and environmentally sound in order to create a sustainable, efficient, and healthy atmosphere for our students, faculty, and staff.”


Is the institution an endorser or signatory of the following? :
Yes or No
The Earth Charter No
The Higher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI) No
ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter No
Second Nature’s Carbon Commitment (formerly known as the ACUPCC), Resilience Commitment, and/or integrated Climate Commitment Yes
The Talloires Declaration (TD) No
UN Global Compact No
Other multi-dimensional sustainability commitments (please specify below) No

A brief description of the institution’s formal sustainability commitments, including the specific initiatives selected above:

The Carbon Commitment was re-signed in 2015.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
---

Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.