Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 66.39
Liaison Shane Stennes
Submission Date Dec. 15, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Stacey White
Sustainability Coordinator
Facilities Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum Yes Yes
Research (or other scholarship) Yes Yes
+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016
Campus Engagement Yes Yes
Public Engagement Yes Yes
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food No
+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016
No
+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds Yes Yes
+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016
Purchasing Yes No
Transportation Yes Yes
+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016
Waste Yes Yes
Water Yes Yes
+ Date Revised: Feb. 17, 2016
Diversity and Affordability Yes No
Health, Wellbeing and Work No
+ Date Revised: Feb. 17, 2016
No
Investment Yes No
Other --- ---

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

The University of Minnesota Systemwide Sustainability: Goals, Outcomes, Measures, Process report (http://italladdsup.umn.edu/assets/pdf/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdf) from 2009 established the following four goals related to curriculum:
-Capture the land-grant mission: Sustainability is part of the educational or campus experience of each and every University of Minnesota student
-Integrate service learning into the undergraduate and graduate experience, linking students, faculty, University of Minnesota Extension, and community partners
-Create and implement curricula and educational programs that address the interface of environment, society, and economy
-Develop outreach programs for sustainability education of working professionals in the public and private sector

More recently, the Twin Cities campus has developed a ten-year strategic plan that includes the development of Grand Challenges Curriculum to address “important global issues through a solution-driven, interdisciplinary approach to learning.” Initial Grand Challenges courses such as “GCC 3001: Can we feed the world without destroying it?” and “GCC 3010/5010 Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge - Creating an Empowered Movement for Change” have been strongly aligned with sustainability principles.

In addition, besides their required courses, students must fulfill liberal education requirements, including theme courses. Environmental studies is one of five required liberal arts themes. http://onestop.umn.edu/degree_planning/lib_eds/fall_2010_requirements/index.html

The University of Minnesota also offers the Sustainability Minor Program which allows students to relate real-world problem from other academic perspectives and incorporates disciplines from all sciences.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

The Twin Cities strategic plan identifies a number of strategies and quick wins to advance implementation of Grand Challenges Curriculum. These include:
Develop additional University seminars focused on grand-challenge topics
Develop a Grand Challenges Scholars Program
Develop additional University seminars focused on grand-challenge topics
Develop undergraduate minors focused on grand-challenge topics

+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

Karen Hanson, Provost

+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):

The University of Minnesota Systemwide Sustainability: Goals, Outcomes, Measures, Process report (http://italladdsup.umn.edu/assets/pdf/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdf) from 2009 established the following five goals related to research:
-To advance sustainability, nurture cross-disciplinary collaboration and sharing of ideas and perspectives within and beyond the University
-To advance sustainability, promote civically engaged, socially informed, and community responsive research and scholarship
-To advance sustainability, instill sustainability principles in the research culture of the University of Minnesota; all levels of University leadership should embrace sustainability as a core pillar of the University’s mission
-To advance sustainability, eliminate institutional barriers and disincentives to interdisciplinary and collaborative sustainability research
-To advance sustainability, transform the University of Minnesota into a living laboratory for sustainability

More recently, the Twin Cities campus has developed a ten-year strategic plan that includes the development of Grand Challenges Research to “marshal the University of Minnesota’s
research and creative capacity—our breadth and depth—to address grand challenges critical to our state, nation, and world.” Grand Challenges Research topics are being developed and refined, and initial focus areas have been strongly aligned with sustainability principles.

In addition, the University has established the MnDRIVE and Convergence Colloquia initiatives. MnDRIVE is a landmark partnership between the University and the state of Minnesota that aligns areas of University research strength with the state’s key and emerging industries to address grand challenges. MnDRIVE’s focus areas are Robotics, Global Food, Environment, and Brain Conditions. Convergence Colloquia are action-oriented think tanks focusing on critical issues for our communities, from building smarter cities to exploring alternative energy sources to improving water quality to securing our food supply, that bring together U of M researchers with private, public and nonprofit stakeholders to identify strategic collaboration opportunities that can lead to significant impact at the local, state, national and global scales.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):

The Twin Cities strategic plan identifies a number of strategies and quick wins to advance implementation of Grand Challenges curriculum. These include:
-Change policies to recognize contributions to interdisciplinary (including grand-challenge) efforts as part of promotion and tenure and regular evaluation
Identify resources to meet the research challenge goals and align additional fund-raising efforts as appropriate
-Jump-start institutional transformation by elevating and broadening select existing areas of interdisciplinary strength and focus that instantiate a “Grand Challenge” approach (with additional grand-challenges priorities to be identified by the campus community over the next year)
-Provide bottom-up support for emerging interdisciplinary (potential grand-challenge) problems

+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):

Karen Hanson, Provost
Brian Herman, Vice President for Research

+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:

The University’s Board of Regents’ Policy Sustainability and Energy Efficiency articulates that “Sustainability requires the collective actions of the University of Minnesota community.” In accordance with that, the University of Minnesota Systemwide Sustainability: Goals, Outcomes, Measures, Process report (http://italladdsup.umn.edu/assets/pdf/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdf) from 2009 established the following goals related to Campus Engagement:
-The pursuit of sustainability will actively engage all dimensions of the University
of Minnesota, and the University will promote activism and engagement related to sustainability
-Capture the land-grant mission: Sustainability is part of the educational or campus experience of each and every University of Minnesota student
-Embrace an organizational culture and individual decisions that support an inclusive,
engaged, active, and sustainable healthy community

+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:

The Systemwide Sustainability Report established the objective “For residents, sustainability is an explicit aspect of living in student housing and being on campus.” To that end, initiatives such as Campus Conservation Nationals, the sustainability advocates program, and Eco-Scouts have been undertaken to make sustainability an integral part of the experience for the nearly 7,000 students that live on-campus.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 15, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):

The Office of Sustainability Director Shane Stennes and Coordinator Stacey White.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:

The University’s Ten-Point Plan for Advancing and Institutionalizing Public Engagement (http://engagement.umn.edu/about-engagement/ten-point-plan-advancing-and-institutionalizing-public-engagement) seeks to:
1. establish a more systematic approach to assessing the range, scope, and impacts
of the hundreds of engagement activities, programs, and initiatives taking place
across the University;
2. cultivate stronger, sustainable community connections in ways that address the
most pressing immediate and longer-term needs of society;
3. support University personnel, programs, and centers involved in engagement
work in the development of their expertise and prominence as national and
international leaders in the engagement field;
4. provide and support opportunities for individuals and units, across the University
to convene to share their work and expertise, cultivate new collaborations (e.g.,
new interdisciplinary initiatives), and build alliances that enhance participants’
capacity to advance their work;
5. garner extramural funds that support new engagement initiatives and programs;
6. raise the University of Minnesota’s status as an “engaged” research university;
7. expand opportunities for the University to participate in national and international
engagement networks;
8. support, implement, and evaluate innovative public engagement initiatives that
advance the University’s key institutional priorities;
9. support the cultivation of emerging engaged scholars who will serve as civically
engaged leaders, citizens, employees, and researchers; and
10. develop, support, and implement strategic initiatives that raise the status and
legitimacy of engaged scholarship in ways that promote the advancement of the
University of Minnesota as a top research university.

As one component of this plan, the Office of Public Engagement has catalyzed the formation of issue area networks that are “designed to strengthen the alignment of the University's community-engaged activities around societal issues, activities which are currently operating independently across various offices, units, and departments.” These networks are on the topics of diversity, equity, and inclusion; economic development; food; transportation; and youth and education.

In addition, the University has active public engagement programs such as the Clean Energy Resource Teams (CERTs) are a statewide partnership with a shared mission to connect individuals and their communities to the resources they need to identify and implement community-based clean energy projects. They empower communities and their members to adopt energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy technologies and practices for their homes, businesses, and local institutions.

Another example is the Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships (RSDP), which connects greater Minnesota communities to the University of Minnesota in order to help solve problems and take advantage of new opportunities. As a part of University of Minnesota Extension, RSDP brings together local talent and resources with University of Minnesota knowledge and seed funding to drive sustainability in four areas: agriculture and food systems, tourism and resilient communities, natural resources, and clean energy.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):

The Office of Public Engagement has developed an extensive metrics framework available at http://engagement.umn.edu/sites/default/files/PEMC_final_draft_report.pdf

CERTs goals:
-Provide organizing support to help local clean energy efforts get off the ground
-Connect local clean energy efforts with technical & financial resources
-Encourage collaboration among groups planning community-based projects
-Help the state of Minnesota achieve its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals

CERTs measurable outcomes:
-Helped Minnesotans save over 109 billion BTUs of energy and avoid $1.7 million in
energy costs since 2010
-Awarded over $930,000 in seed grants to more than 230 energy projects since 2006
-Impacted 121,000 people through grants, events, and programs since 2009
-Fostered robust networks in each region and across industry sectors

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):

Andrew Furco, Associate Vice President, Public Engagement

Melissa Pawlisch Clean Energy Resource Teams (CERTs) Director

Kathryn Draeger, Statewide Director, Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

The University is a signatory to the Second Nature Carbon Commitment and has developed a Climate Action Plan (z.umn.edu/CAP) to guide our greenhouse gas mitigation efforts.

In the Climate Action Plan, the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities has identified 10 strategies to implement which will collectively cut our carbon footprint nearly in half relative to 2008 levels. The strategies focus on a) becoming more efficient in how we use electricity, heat, and cooling on campus and b) providing the energy we use in less carbon intensive ways. Strategy areas include: computer energy efficiency, lighting efficiency, building recommissioning, sustainable building standards, laboratory energy efficiency, campus size, steam plant fuel mix, combined heat and power, window replacement, and renewable energy projects.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

29% reduction in scope 1, 2, and 3 greenhouse gas emissions by 2016 relative to 2008 baseline.
49% reduction in scope 1, 2, and 3 greenhouse gas emissions by 2021 relative to 2008 baseline.
Climate neutrality target date is 2050.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

The Office of Sustainability Director Shane Stennes and Coordinator Stacey White.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

The Sustainability and Energy Efficiency policy specifically requires sustainable design guidelines to be applied to all major new construction and renovation projects. These standards adapt the LEED building policy to specific regional issues, namely Minnesota’s Sustainable Building Guidelines (B3) developed by the University’s Center for Sustainable Building Research. The University received LEED Silver certification on the 50,000-seat TCF Bank Stadium. The University received LEED Gold certification for Robert H. Bruininks Hall (formerly Science Teaching and Student Services Building). 90% of demolition materials were recycled or used elsewhere.

Regents Policy as well as the Campus Master Plan drive all University projects to balance economic and programmatic drivers with sustainability considerations. The definition of sustainability considerations in renovation as well as new construction addresses all building systems, siting of buildings on campus sites, choice of materials, design features that respond to environmental conditions (wind, sun, below grade conditions), manage project-related impacts (treatment of stormwater runoff)


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

State funded projects (most are large scale in scope and size) are required to meet B3 standards. B3 guidelines reference multiple components of a capital project. See B3 webpage for details of what these requirements entail.

Non state-funded projects (typically lesser in scale and usually focused on renovation), whether completed by CPPM or UConstruction, are expected to meet internal UMN targets for energy use and UMN standards for design, referenced in our construction standards. These standards address a wide range of topics from construction specifications to management of construction waste to the use of passive design techniques such as daylighting and managing solar gain. See link for details

The B3 Guidelines can be applied to the design of new buildings or renovations to meet sustainability goals for site, water, energy, indoor environment, materials and waste. They can be found here: http://www.b3mn.org/guidelines/index.html


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

Accountable parties for building plans consist of a) Capital Planning and Project Management as well as b) Engineering Records and c) U Construction
HIstoric records and utility infrastructure records required for design and construction are typically maintained by Engineering REcords. Active construction and renovation projects are carried in CPPM or in U Construction, depending on the responsible unit completing the work.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:

University Dining Services (UDS) donates surplus food from its retail locations to non-profits and will be expanding this program fall 2015 to include residential dining. UDS incorporates locally grown, organic, sustainably raised and Fair Trade foods and beverages into their menus, purchasing directly from the University student organic farm, U of MN Meat and Cheese Lab, the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and U of MN Bee Lab as well as other local Minnesota growers. In an effort to reduce waste at all stages of the food cycle, UDS has implemented a waste minimizing food management process, conducts waste awareness events, composts both front and back of house and has implemented tray-less dining in all seven residential restaurants. In 2015, UDS converted to 100% cage free shell eggs which is in addition to their 100% cage free liquid egg purchases; Dining Services is working towards 100% sustainable seafood purchases by 2018.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

UDS purchases locally grown, organic, sustainably raised, Fair Trade and Rainforest Alliance foods and beverages. Partnerships include MN Homegrown, U of MN student organic farm, Cornercopia, Bee Lab, Andrew Boss Meat and Cheese Lab, Future Farms, and the U of MN’s Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. In 2015, UDS purchased 497,932 pounds of local produce, 12,332 pounds of local meat, 806,237 pounds of local dairy products and 113,848 pounds of cage free eggs.  On average, they purchase over 14,000 pounds of sustainable seafood per year.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

University Dining Services.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

The University is a signatory to the Second Nature Carbon Commitment and has developed a Climate Action Plan (z.umn.edu/CAP) to guide our greenhouse gas mitigation efforts. The majority of actions in the climate action plan are related to energy supply and consumption.

The University’s Energy Management department does annual business planning and long-term planning in the form of Utility Master Plans. Both annual planning and long-term planning are guided by Energy Management’s three principles - reliability, cost effectiveness, and sustainability.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

Through the It All Adds Up campaign, the University has avoided more than $7.1 million in energy costs, and has resulted in the release of nearly 107,000 fewer tons of CO2 into the atmosphere annually.

As of 2015, the University has seven Energy Star-certified buildings.

To reach the goals laid out in the Climate Action Plan, the University is renovating the Old Main steam plant to build a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant.This renovation will help the Twin Cities better control its utility costs and will reduce its carbon footprint by 10% or more.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

Energy Management, Facilities Management.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

The Twin Cities Campus Master Plan (https://cppm.umn.edu/sites/cppm.umn.edu/files/umtc_mp_2009.pdf) lays out the following guiding principles to support the development and operation of campus grounds in a more sustainable way:
-Preserve and enhance natural systems and features
-Optimize the use of campus land and facilities, and apply best practices
-Make the campus environmentally and operationally sustainable
-Utilize the campus as a living laboratory to enhance the University’s mission

The Plan establishes a number of guidelines in support of these principles.

In addition to this, the University of Minnesota Systemwide Sustainability: Goals, Outcomes, Measures, Process report (http://italladdsup.umn.edu/assets/pdf/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdf) from 2009 established the following goal related to grounds:
-Plan, program, design, construct, and operate University of Minnesota facilities throughout their life cycle to provide restorative impacts to the natural environment and a healthy indoor environment for the University community

Finally, University Landcare is in the process of developing a landcare master plan to advance specific objectives articulated in the Campus Master Plan.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

Grounds related objectives from the Systemwide Sustainability report include:
-Pervious surface use is increased
-Flora and fauna biodiversity is maximized on building sites
-Soil conservation is maximized
-Stormwater is managed to reduce runoff quantity, rate, and pollution

Some examples of these measures in practice:
-Native plants were inventoried in 2014 and resulted in a count of 89,268 herbaceous plants, grasses and forbs. There were also 6,350 native trees and 21,862 native shrubs.
-Woody plants are used whenever possible for mulch in other parts of campus.
-University Landcare applies salt in a brine, thereby cutting road salt use (and impacts to stormwater quality) by 41%.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

University Landcare, Les Potts.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:

The Board of Regents policy on Sustainability and Energy Efficiency was adopted on July 9, 2004. The University of Minnesota Purchasing Services group, through leveraging of our buyer power and supplier relationships, can help support this policy and further our journey toward making the University of Minnesota a model in the application of sustainability principles to guide campus operations.

The goal is to encourage and increase purchasing that reflects the University's commitment to sustainability. This will further our efforts to promote environmental factors such as: Conserving natural resources, Minimizing environmental impacts such as pollution and use of water and energy, Eliminating or reducing toxins that create hazards to workers and our community, Supporting strong recycling markets, Reducing materials that are land-filled, Increasing the use and availability of environmentally preferable products that protect the environment, Identifying environmentally preferable products and distribution systems, Rewarding manufacturers and vendors that offer environmentally preferable products. All Category Managers within Purchasing Services will work within their commodity areas when applicable to promote this policy.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):

University of Minnesota Purchasing Services group


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:

The Twin Cities Campus Master Plan (https://cppm.umn.edu/sites/cppm.umn.edu/files/umtc_mp_2009.pdf) lays out the following guiding principles to support the development and operation of transportation systems in a more sustainable way:
-Integrate transportation systems to emphasize pedestrians, bicycles, and transit.

The Plan establishes a number of guidelines in support of these principles.

In addition to this, the University of Minnesota Systemwide Sustainability: Goals, Outcomes, Measures, Process report (http://italladdsup.umn.edu/assets/pdf/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdf) from 2009 established the following goal related to transportation:
-Use lower impact transportation alternatives that increase fuel efficiency, provide more
sustainable fuel options, and help reduce the miles traveled on campus, to campus, and as part of the University of Minnesota enterprise

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):

The University of Minnesota Systemwide Sustainability: Goals, Outcomes, Measures, Process report (http://italladdsup.umn.edu/assets/pdf/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdf) established the following measures and outcomes related to transportation:
-Alternative transportation is increasingly available and use of mass transit is increasingly encouraged
-Everyone on campus has a wide array of transportation options; safety and convenience for all modes of travel, including walking and bicycling, has increased
-Housing alternatives for students, faculty, and staff near campus have been encouraged
-Meeting and distance learning technologies are supported
-Proper maintenance of fleet and operations vehicles, purchase of fuel efficient or alternatively fueled vehicles, and access to technology to reduce unnecessary travel has increased campus fleet efficiency

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):

Parking and Transportation Services


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

The University of Minnesota Systemwide Sustainability: Goals, Outcomes, Measures, Process report (http://italladdsup.umn.edu/assets/pdf/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdf) from 2009 established the following goal related to waste:
-Manage resources for their highest end use by reducing consumption, minimizing waste,
and strongly supporting the reuse and highest value recycling of unwanted materials

+ Date Revised: Feb. 16, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

Waste related objectives from the Systemwide Sustainability report include:
-Informed purchasing and resource-use decisions reduce consumption of materials
-Fewer goods and services are purchased by University operations
-Rethinking waste-producing processes reduces waste
-Reuse of existing resources by individuals and by institutional reuse programs is
supported
-Recycling of a wide range of materials is supported

In alignment with these goals, the University of Minnesota materials recovery facility now diverts more than 3,800 tons of recyclable material annually, or 41% of the U’s municipal solid waste stream. In addition, the University of Minnesota ReUse Program's Pack and Give Back program has diverted over 300,000 pounds of household items from landfills, and back to students and the neighborhood.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 17, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

University of Minnesota Facilities Management


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

The Twin Cities Campus Master Plan (https://cppm.umn.edu/sites/cppm.umn.edu/files/umtc_mp_2009.pdf) lays out the following guiding principles to support the development and operation of campus in a more sustainable way relative to water:
- Preserve and enhance natural systems and features
- Optimize the use of campus land and facilities, and apply best practices
- Make the campus environmentally and operationally sustainable
- Utilize the campus as a living laboratory to enhance the University’s mission

The Plan establishes a number of guidelines in support of these principles.

In addition to this, the University of Minnesota Systemwide Sustainability: Goals, Outcomes, Measures, Process report (http://italladdsup.umn.edu/assets/pdf/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdf) established the following goal related to water:
- Plan, program, design, construct, and operate University of Minnesota facilities throughout their life cycle to provide restorative impacts to the natural environment and a healthy indoor environment for the University community

+ Date Revised: Feb. 17, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):

Water related objectives from the Systemwide Sustainability report include:
-Potable water use is reduced
-Wastewater is reduced
-Stormwater is managed to reduce runoff quantity, rate, and pollution

In addition to this, all new buildings and major renovations at the University that are funded by the State of Minnesota are subject to the State’s Sustainable Building Guidelines (i.e. B3). The guidelines include rigorous measures and requirements related to potable water consumption and stormwater run-off (http://www.b3mn.org/guidelines/site.html). Furthermore, the University’s stormwater practices are governed under a Municipal Stormwater Permit (MS4 - http://www.dehs.umn.edu/envircomp_swm_swpoverview.htm), which identifies objectives and strategies.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 17, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

University Health and Safety, Energy Management, Facilities Management, and Capital Planning and Project Management

+ Date Revised: Feb. 17, 2016

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

Beginning in the summer of 2014, President Kaler convened a working group of senior leaders to address the critical issue of campus climate. As a result of this convening, the University has launched a comprehensive, campus-wide initiative on campus climate (http://campus-climate.umn.edu/), which includes initiatives to advance diversity and affordability. In addition, the Office of Equity and Diversity (https://diversity.umn.edu/) has led the development of a University Equity and Diversity Vision Framework (https://diversity.umn.edu/sites/default/files/U%20of%20MN%2C%20Equity%20and%20Diversity%20Vision%20Framework.pdf) which identifies eight priorities. One priority is reimagining strategies for achieving the University’s retention and success goals for diverse students and includes six potential action steps to advance this priority.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 17, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

The Office for Equity and Diversity works with individual academic and administrative units to identify mission-driven strategies and diversity goals, and to develop corollary implementation plans that include benchmarks and metrics for measuring progress to those goals.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

The Office for Equity and Diversity is ultimately responsible for this plan, but we see equity and diversity as a shared responsibility across the University. As noted above, much of our work focuses on building an institutional infrastructure that will sustain an integrated and comprehensive effort to make the University of Minnesota a place where everyone is respected and supported in the pursuit of excellence.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:

The University of Minnesota's Wellness program promotes healthy and local eating and bike commuting as a sustainable and healthy mode of transportation.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

University of Minnesota Wellness Program


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:

The Board of Regents’ Policy: Endowment Fund requires an annual report on the “steps taken to provide opportunities to emerging, minority-owned, and woman-owned investment management firms; and an evaluation of investments related to sustainability and renewable energy.” The Policy also states that “The University shall consider social responsibility in its investment decisions.” http://regents.umn.edu/sites/regents.umn.edu/files/policies/Endowment_Fund.pdf

In alignment with this policy direction, the University’s Office of Investment and Banking (OIB) “recognizes that investments which are socially responsible, including those that support a healthy environment, energy conservation, and prudent use of natural resources can also meet the financial and fiduciary requirements” (Page 19 - https://regents.umn.edu/sites/regents.umn.edu/files/fin_-_sep_2015_1.pdf). Furthermore, OIB routinely interviews “targeted investment managers which are defined as emerging investment managers (less than $250 million under management) and minority / women owned investment firms.” Over the past year 5 targeted investment fund managers were hired and in June 2015 the University invested $50 million in the iShares MSCI ACWI Low Carbon Target ETF to reduce exposure to public companies with high carbon emissions and reserves.

+ Date Revised: Feb. 17, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Investment plan(s):
---

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:
---

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the other plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the other plan(s):
---

The institution’s definition of sustainability:

Sustainability means finding or creating solutions that meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. A sustainable perspective recognizes the conflicts and trade-offs of balancing economic growth, social equity and environmental integrity.


Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

Sustainability is a continuous effort integrating environmental, social, and economic
goals through design, planning, and operational organization to meet current needs
without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Sustainability requires the collective actions of the University of Minnesota community
and shall be guided by the balanced use of all resources, within budgetary constraints.
The University is committed to incorporating sustainability into its teaching, research,
and outreach and the operations that support them.

This is accomplished by
• Leadership
• Modeling
• Operational Improvements
• Energy Efficiency
• Research
• Education and Outreach


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.