Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 80.84
Liaison Teddy Lhoutellier
Submission Date April 26, 2024

STARS v2.2

University of Miami
OP-10: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 Teddy Lhoutellier
Sustainability Manager
Environmental Health and Safety
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of the legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance:
The Richmond Campus consists of 78 acres with several buildings, two 11.3 m antennas, and a 20 m antenna. The Campus is surrounded by Pine Rocklands. Pine Rocklands grow on the coastal Miami Rock Ridge, a limestone rock outcropping that extends south and west from North Miami Beach to Long Pine Key in Everglades National Park. Over 225 types of native plants occur here and more than 20% of the plant species are found here and nowhere else in the world. Five of these plant species are federally listed as threatened or endangered.

Has the institution conducted an assessment to identify endangered and vulnerable species (including migratory species) with habitats on land owned or managed by the institution?:
Yes

A list of endangered and vulnerable species with habitats on land owned or managed by the institution, by level of extinction risk:
Endangered Species: Deltoid Spurge (Chamaesyce deltoidea) Tiny Polygala (Polygala smallii)

Has the institution conducted an assessment to identify areas of biodiversity importance on land owned or managed by the institution?:
Yes

A brief description of areas of biodiversity importance on land owned or managed by the institution:
Habitat: Pine Rockland Natural Forest Flatland with exposed limestone substrate; mesic-xeric; southern peninsula and Keys; frequent to occasional fire (3-7 years); open pine canopy with mixed shrubs and herbs in under story; South Florida slash pine, palms, mixed tropical and temperate shrubs, grasses, and herbs.

The methodologies used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or areas of biodiversity importance and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:
Pine Rockland Natural Forest community: Walking transects through habitat have been performed since 2001. Currently, site inspections are performed quarterly in conjunction with habitat maintenance operations (see below) on 76 acres of habitat.

A brief description of the scope of the assessment(s):
The Richmond Campus consists of 78 acres that are managed on a constant basis for biodiversity protection.

A brief description of the plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats, and/or ecosystems:
ABM and Biscayne Environmental perform monthly maintenance visits to perform cutting and spraying of exotic species including Burma reed, Brazilian pepper, bischopwood, earleaf acacia, umbrella tree, Australian pine, lead tree, and mother-in-law tongue. Maintains the firebreaks and provides a montly report. UM has a part-time employee who is also an archeologist who works at Little Salt Spring to maintain it.

Estimated percentage of areas of biodiversity importance that are also protected areas :
100

Website URL where information about the institution’s biodiversity initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Data source(s) and notes about the submission:
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