Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 66.97
Liaison Teddy Lhoutellier
Submission Date March 13, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Miami
OP-23: Rainwater Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 Teddy Lhoutellier
Sustainability Manager
Environmental Health and Safety
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Which of the following best describes the institution’s approach to rainwater management?:
Comprehensive policies, plans or guidelines that require LID practices for all new projects

A brief description of the institution’s green infrastructure and LID practices:

Since 2008, all UM new construction need to achieve a LEED® Silver certification. This implies for most of those new construction and big renovation and certain degree of sustainable rainwater management during the construction phase and after commissioning. For the summary of UM LEED projects score cards, visit http://dc.ref.miami.edu/uprojects/green-building-facts/index.html

Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music - LEED® Platinum
Rainwater Harvesting:
A large on-site cistern captures and treats rainwater for reuse through irrigation and to flush all toilets and urinals in the building, replacing the need to use potable (drinking) water for these uses. Overall, this reduces the project’s potable water usage by 87% for interior plumbing fixtures, and by 100% for irrigation needs.

The NET ZERO WATER Building Project:
UM College of Engineering received a Grant for a Self-Sustaining Water System:
an autonomous net-zero water dormitory at UM.
Did you know that raw sewage is typically more than 99.9% freshwater, and that across South Florida, treated wastewater on average meets 87 of the 93 drinking water requirements without further treatment (Comparative Assessment of Human and Ecological Impacts Final Report, Florida Water Environment Association Utility Council, 12 July 2001) When this stable, non-seasonal, freshwater source is disposed to the ocean or to deep saltwater aquifers, impurities are increased by a factor of almost 100. Most of this material is salt, which requires extremely high energy to remove, by either reverse osmosis or distillation, if the water is then withdrawn for water supply. Why not save that energy and reuse the treated water, which has approximately the required volume and quality needed to supply urban demand. In addition, 3-4% of total electricity consumption in the US is used for conveyance of water and wastewater, and this energy can be saved through low-energy, on-site water reuse.
http://www.coe.miami.edu/wqel/netzero/


A copy of the institution’s rainwater management policy, plan, and/or guidelines:
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A brief description of the institution’s rainwater management policy, plan, and/or guidelines that supports the responses above:

Any new construction or big renovation at UM needs to align with the following intent: To reduce runoff volume and improve water quality by replicating the natural hydrology and water balance of the site, based on historical conditions and undeveloped ecosystems in the region.

It also need to achieve the requirement for the LEED® BD+C Rainwater Management credit:

Option 1. Percentile of rainfall events
Path 1. 95th percentile (2 points except Healthcare, 1 point Healthcare)
In a manner best replicating natural site hydrology processes, manage on site the runoff from the developed site for the 95th percentile of regional or local rainfall events using low-impact development (LID) and green infrastructure.
Use daily rainfall data and the methodology in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for Federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act to determine the 95th percentile amount.
OR
Path 2. 98th percentile (3 points except Healthcare, 2 points Healthcare)
Achieve Path 1 but for the 98th percentile of regional or local rainfall events, using LID and green infrastructure.
OR
Path 3. Zero lot line projects only – 85th Percentile (3 points except Healthcare, 2 points Healthcare))
The following requirement applies to zero lot line projects in urban areas with a minimum density of 1.5 FAR. In a manner best replicating natural site hydrology processes, manage on site the runoff from the developed site for the 85th percentile of regional or local rainfall events, using LID and green infrastructure.
OR
Option 2. Natural land cover conditions (3 points except Healthcare, 2 points Healthcare)


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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