Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 74.20
Liaison Juanita Van Norman
Submission Date Aug. 5, 2022

STARS v2.2

University of Manitoba
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Gennaro Pellegrino
Assistant Manager
Purchasing Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines, or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across multiple commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
---

The policies, guidelines or directives:

The UM Purchasing Policy section 2.4 states:
Purchases of goods and services shall be consistent with public tendering principles. Purchasing Procedures shall ensure:
• Compliance with applicable legislation;
• Open, ethical, fair and transparent competition;
• Selection of goods/services based on the best value taking into consideration such criteria as price, total life-cycle cost, product or service quality, bid compliancy, supplier qualifications, experience and reputation; and
• Where appropriate, consideration will be given to the impact on the environment, human health, and social well-being.
https://umanitoba.ca/governance/sites/governance/files/2021-05/Purchasing%20Policy%20-%202014_03_12%20RF.pdf

UM BookStore has a No Sweat Policy which states:
At the Fort Garry BookStore we believe in fair labour practices. That's why we've implemented a No Sweat Policy. We require all vendors to follow the Fair Labor Association's Code of Conduct (PDF).

Please note: our buyers will only purchase clothing from vendors and manufacturers who employ fair labour practices and require they follow the Fair Labor Association Workplace Code of Conduct (PDF).
https://umanitoba.ca/bookstore/policies

University of Manitoba Students’ Union (UMSU)
Position Statements of the University of Manitoba Students’ Union (Amended 01 February 2019)
Position #2: Sustainability states:
UMSU is committed to protecting and enhancing the social, economic, and ecological environment, and to promoting socially accountable and sustainable practices. UMSU supports:
• purchasing policies that favour products that are socially, economically, and ecologically sustainable;
• Working with the University community, including faculty and staff, the central administration, physical plant, food services, and other groups to support and encourage University policies and external contracts that recognize and act on sustainability;
• Ensuring the University’s actions meet the standard set out by their policies, and that the goals set by the University are fully integrated with their actual day-to-day operations;
• Regular sustainability audits of UMSU’s internal operations to ensure we meet the standard set by our goals and principles; and,

UMSU Opposes:
• Wasteful consumption of energy and other resources, and the production of waste products and harmful substances, on or off campus;
• Purchasing practices that exploit the labour of any individual or community;
• Initiatives that create illusions of a sustainability mandate without delivering on that vision; and
• Narrowly-focused sustainability strategies that ignore any social, economic, or environmental implications
https://umsu.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/UMSU-Position-Statement-Book-Working-Copy_UpdatedFeb2019.pdf

UMSU Governance and Operations Manual of the University of Manitoba Students’ Union (Amended 20 January 2022) Section XXI: Ethical Purchasing states:
32. When making decisions of whom to purchase from or what goods or services to purchase, UMSU shall prioritize:
a. Local businesses, as a means of supporting the local economy and residents of Winnipeg and Manitoba.
b. Minimizing, and preferably avoiding, the purchase of goods or services that are socially, economically, or ecologically exploitative or destructive.
c. Suppliers that are fair-trade certified by a legitimate fair-trade labelling organization that is independent of industry.
https://umsu.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/UMSU-Governance-and-Operations-Manual-Updated-January-2022.pdf

UM is also guided by the Province of Manitoba’s Green Procurement Guidelines, including The Climate and Green Plan Act: https://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/statutes/ccsm/_pdf.php?cap=c134 and Manitoba’s Sustainable Development Procurement Guidelines: https://www.gov.mb.ca/central/psc/pubs/sustainable_development_procurement_guidelines.pdf.

These guidelines are to be considered in any procurement and in broad outline would include promoting environmental sustainable economic development; conserving resources; conserving energy; promoting pollution prevention, waste reduction and diversion; and evaluating value, performance and need


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA as a matter of policy and standard practice when evaluating all energy- and water-using products, systems and building components

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

As a matter of general policy that is applied to all purchases, UM considers the total life-cycle costs part of its public tendering principles. The application LCCA incorporates an evaluation of the product’s purchase, installation, operation, maintenance and disposal costs.

Purchasing Policy section 2.4 states:
Purchases of goods and services shall be consistent with public tendering principles. Purchasing Procedures shall ensure:
• Compliance with applicable legislation;
• Open, ethical, fair and transparent competition;
• Selection of goods/services based on the best value taking into consideration such criteria as price, total life-cycle cost, product or service quality, bid compliancy, supplier qualifications, experience and reputation; and
• Where appropriate, consideration will be given to the impact on the environment, human health, and social well-being.
https://umanitoba.ca/governance/sites/governance/files/2021-05/Purchasing%20Policy%20-%202014_03_12%20RF.pdf


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:

https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/338
All Janitorial Cleaning Supplies including all-purpose/hard surface industrial cleaners, toilet bowl cleaners, floor cleaner, degreasers, dishwasher detergents, floor strippers, disinfectants, glass cleaners, carpet and upholstery cleaners, spot and stain removers, odour control, drain, and grease trap additives must be EcoLogo or Green Seal certified. Floor cleaners and floor strippers must be compatible with the floor manufacturer’s specifications. Adhesives, shellacs, finishes, varnishes, and paints/coatings must meet the California Code of Regulations' maximum allowable Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) for Specific Product Category (http://www.arb.ca.gov/consprod/regs/regs.htm).

Hand soaps must meet one of the following: (1) Does not contain antimicrobial agents (other than as a preservative) except where required by health codes and other regulations; or (2) Green Seal or EcoLogo certified for hand cleaners and hand soaps. Instant hand sanitizers must be EcoLogo certified. If dispensers are required, information about various dispensing options that increase hygiene, minimize cost, and maximize environmental savings should be requested.

For cleaning chemical types excluded from the EcoLogo and Green Seal certification program (ex. graffiti remover, drain cleaner, etc.), vendors must disclose information regarding the following: hazardous ingredients present, biodegradability of total product, percent VOC in product, pH, fragrance, type of dye, oral toxicity of product, and presence of optical brightener. Products must not contain: any known or suspected carcinogens/teratogens/mutagens as per the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Products also must not contain endocrine disrupters, phosphates, or substances listed on the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency’s (CEPA) toxic substance lists. Products must also be non-aerosol.

Other recommendations are included for microfiber mopping systems and bin liners (garbage bags, recycling bags, compost bags), and janitorial paper products (paper towels, paper napkins, facial tissue, and toilet paper).
https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/337

Cleaning Services includes contracted building cleaning services. To minimize the potential for unfair wages and poor worker conditions, the contractor shall adhere to all provisions of the Employment Standard Code C.C.S.M. c. E110 in respect to wages, hours of work, and conditions of employment for both employees and individual subcontractors (http://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/statutes/ccsm/e110e.php).

Cleaning services must use janitorial cleaning supplies and products with the sustainable specifications mentioned in this document. http://manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/338

Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance includes fertilizer application, weed control, and insect and disease control:
• Fertilizer Application - The Contractor shall adhere to the fertilizer requirements described under the Water Protection Act in the Nutrient Management Regulation which is intended to minimize the amount of fertilizer necessary to produce a healthy and attractive landscape. The Contractor shall take soil samples in a variety of locations to determine the need for soil/ plant nutrients before applying fertilizer. Fertilizer should only be applied if the soil is without adequate nutrients for plant vigor – the intent is to reduce overall fertilizer application to keep salt build-up in the soil and to minimize excessive plant growth that requires more maintenance time, water, and fertilization. Preference must be given to organic fertilizers; prohibit fertilizers under the Organic Urban Land Care’s Organic Land Care Standard, Fourth Edition, 2007 List 1. Regular upgrading of the soil resource should be accomplished using compost materials to increase soil fertility and enhance soil moisture retention.
• Weed Control - The Contractor is responsible for keeping all areas free of weeds. The Contractor is required to control weeds by: 1) the use of organic mulches; 2) manual labour; and 3) herbicide controls, in that order.
• Insect and Disease Control - The Contractor shall minimize the potential of insect infestations and disease through proper plant and material selection, appropriate site preparation, and careful maintenance. The Contractor shall have the ability to diagnose and treat insect problems and diseases; preference shall be given to the use of: 1) biological controls; 2) organic insecticide/ pesticide/ fungicides; and 3) the least toxic chemical controls, in that order.
• Other recommendations are included for contracted service qualifications, plant stock selection, plant stock warranty and replacement, landscape waste cleanup, pruning, and lawn maintenance.
https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/343


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating consumable office products?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for consumable office products:

Promotional Products/Electronic Gadgets (ex. Flashlights, tire pressure gauges, calculators, radios) - Preference for energy source to be renewable (e.g. solar, rechargeable, etc.) rather than single-use battery-operated. LED bulbs (if applicable). (https://manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/335)

Copy paper (white and coloured copy paper), file folders (manila or coloured), and envelopes (white woven) - Minimum 30% post-consumer waste content or minimum 50% renewable agricultural fibre. Certification by one of the following: 1. Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) 2. Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) 3. Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC).
Other things to consider: show preference for paper whitening using bleaching agents that do not contain chlorine compounds (e.g. Process Chlorine-free); Green Seal or EcoLogo certified.

Kraft envelopes (white and coloured, including manila), and kraft envelopes (unbleached), and adhesive notes - Minimum 10% post-consumer waste content. Certification by one of the following: 1. Forest Stewardship Council 2. Sustainable Forestry Initiative 3. Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification.

Adhesive notes - Must be FSC certified.

Other recommendations included for thermal receipt paper, janitorial paper supplies, paperboard packaging, binders, clipboards, writing supplies, and other miscellaneous office products.
https://manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/355


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating furniture and furnishings?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for furniture and furnishings:

All project specifications for construction in Request for Tenders (RFT) reference sustainable initiative clauses as required for individual projects. Examples of these requirements are:
1. Sustainable Design Submittals:
1.1 LEED Canada submittals: in accordance with Section 01 35 21 – LEED Requirements.
2. Submittals for Information
2.1 Sustainable Design: Provide required LEED documentation for certification in accordance with Section 01 35 18 – LEED Requirements and Procedures
3. Manufacturer shall be certified under the International Organization for Standardization for:
3.1 ISO 9001 – Quality Management system
3.2 ISO 14001 – Environmental Management system

Project Specifications for Request for Proposals (RFP) also requests the following information:
“The University if committed to considering all social, environmental and economic impacts of all its purchases. Identify, in reasonable detail, any sustainable initiatives your team will propose to incorporate into this project, providing examples of where your company and team members have undertaken similar initiatives on past projects.”
https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/336

Carpeting (synthetic carpets) - For commercial modular (tile) and non-modular textile carpet: carpet must be Carpet and Rug Institute (CRI) Green Label certified, adhesive must be CRI Green Label Plus certified, minimum 20% recovered material content (fiber and backing), preferably as post-consumer recycled content, synthetic fiber should be solution dyed, cushion underlay must meet CRI Green Label Plus program requirement (contain a minimum 20% post-consumer/ post-industrial waste content and be 100% recyclable). Request the manufacturer have a take-back program to ensure the replaced carpet and underlay will be reused or recycled. https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/339

Office furniture and panel systems - Must be either GREENGUARD or SCS Indoor Advantage certified.

Furniture (for furniture types excluded from GREENGUARD or SCS Indoor Advantage certification program) - Select wood products and wood components that have an environmental certification (FSC, SFI or PEFC). Foam cushioning must be manufactured without the use of CFCs or HCFCs. Adhesives used in construction must be formaldehyde-free. Furniture glues and adhesives must be low VOC or VOC-free (water-based); vendor to supply a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for all adhesives used in the manufacturing process. Metal components must be powder-coated and contain a minimum average 30% recycled content, preferably including post-consumer recycled content. Plastic components must contain post-consumer recycled content. Fabric options must include biodegradable or recycled content; fabric dyes must be non-toxic and vendor must submit a MSDS for any additional chemical used to treat fabric (ex. for mothproofing, inhibiting mold, mildew resistance, flame retarding). Lighting components shall be equipped with energy-efficient lighting. Furniture must be durable, easy to maintain, and easy to disassemble and recycle.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) and equipment?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for Information Technology (IT) and equipment:

https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/365
Computers and Other Electronics (includes computers, laptops/notebooks, displays (monitors), televisions, networking equipment) - All desktops, laptops, and computer monitors provided are required to have achieved Bronze registration or higher in the EPEAT system. Televisions must be at least EPEAT Silver level certified. If EPEAT is not available (e.g. commercial sized TVs), request for ENERGY STAR certified and RoHS compliant equipment. For networking equipment (e.g. servers), look for Energy Star and RoHS compliant electronics. Bid documents must communicate to suppliers expectations to purchase goods made from electronic manufacturers that are working towards a “conflict mineral free” supply chain. Ask that they provide brand policy and proof of involvement in programs aimed to establish a conflict-free supply chain of Tantalum, Tin, Tungsten and Gold (3T+G). Depending on the required accommodation(s), specifications for these goods must include accessibility features to ensure conformance with the Accessibility for Manitobans Act. The accessibility features of these products must follow the seven principles of universal design (Equitable Use, Flexibility in Use, Simple and Intuitive Use, Perceptible Information, Tolerance for Error, Low Physical Effort and Size and Space for Approach and Use). http://universaldesign.ie/What-isUniversal-Design/The-7-Principles/#p1

https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/348
Printing Devices & Imaging Equipment (printers, scanners, photocopiers, faxes, multifunction devices MFDs) - Imaging equipment must be at least EPEAT Silver level certified. For MFD’s and printers, vendor must provide the following information: life expectancy per printed page for all consumables including drums, cartridges, fuse kits, document feeder kits, roller kits, and image kits, details of their take back program and the recycling of all packaging materials, a lifecycle cost analysis considering the cost of the device(s) from purchase through deployment, maintenance, management, and disposal; the evaluation should include the cost of the initial hardware as well as all other factors including the cost of consumables (paper, toner) and energy consumption. Bid documents must communicate to supplier's expectations to purchase goods made from electronic manufacturers that are working towards a “conflict mineral free” supply chain. Ask that they provide brand policy and proof of involvement in programs aimed to establish a conflict-free supply chain of Tantalum, Tin, Tungsten and Gold (3T+G). Imaging equipment must follow universal design features to accommodate a variety of users to ensure conformance with the Accessibility for Manitobans Act. http://universaldesign.ie/What-is-Universal-Design/The-7-Principles/#p1

https://manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/359
Toner Cartridges (remanufactured) - Specifications of fully remanufactured toner cartridges to be equal to or exceed original equipment manufacturer’s (OEM) cartridge standards of quality and performance, as well as approved remanufactured toner cartridge industry standards. Cartridge to be tested after remanufacture process is complete. Remanufactured products to meet all OEM standards including page yield and print quality. Vendors to guarantee in writing that they will replace any unacceptable cartridges within a reasonable time (ex. 24 hours) and repair any printer damage (ex. clean or replace the printer) caused by a faulty cartridge. Vendors must ensure that remaining toner in used cartridges, and all cartridges, casings, and parts not remanufactured or used to create a remanufactured cartridge, are recycled or disposed of in a manner that complies with all environmental, human health, and safety laws and regulations. Vendors to recycle end-of-life toner cartridges and provide details of its recycling program. Plastic cartridge casing must contain post-consumer waste content. Reduced packaging: toner cartridge to be packaged in a manner that meets or exceeds OEM standards, packaging for toner cartridge to be constructed so as to permit users to repackage spent cartridges for return to manufacturer, all corrugated packaging to contain a minimum 35% post-consumer waste content, production of packaging not to use CFCs or HCFCs, and packaging not to contain polyvinyl chloride plastics (PVCs).

Toner cartridge recycling - Vendor to remanufacture spent toner cartridges to specifications equal to or exceeding OEM cartridge standards of quality and performance and approved remanufactured toner cartridge industry standards. Vendors to ensure that remaining toner in used cartridges, and all cartridges, casings, and parts not remanufactured or used to create a remanufactured cartridge, are recycled or disposed of in a manner that complies with all environmental, human health, and safety laws and regulations. Vendors to recycle end-of-life toner cartridges and provide details of their recycling program.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food service providers:

Excerpts of clauses of sustainability requirements on RFPs are the following:
“A commitment to sustainability that, at a minimum, matches and evolves with the University’s operations, expectations and third-party certification/rating systems. A sustainability program that includes but is not limited to these key areas is required:
• Supply Chain – Does the program seek out suppliers minimizing their environmental impact through the effective use of ecologically sustainable techniques? Does the program track food origin information? Are seasonally available local produce options integrated into menu options? Is transport from producer to campus energy efficient?
• Preparation/Service – Are initiatives in place to ensure that management, kitchen, and serving operations use resources efficiently through the effective deployment of resource-saving practices and technology? Does the program specify energy efficient appliances and equipment? Does the program support trayless dining? Are staff situated to make a contribution to sustainability?
• Disposal – Is as little waste as possible produced? Are compostable or re-usable takeout containers available? Are there mechanisms in place for composting or otherwise reducing the impact of food waste? Is packaging and other waste minimized? Are more ecologically sensitive disposable products preferred? Are recycling and other efficient waste disposal mechanisms in place? Can pre and post-consumer waste be reduced?
• Innovation and education–Are sustainability practices constantly evaluated and updated regularly? Is campus dining situated as an innovator in food service sustainability? Are programs in place to educate the customer/student body about innovations and reasons for operations decisions in food service? Are mechanisms in place to engage with campus stakeholders in continuous improvement of a sustainable food system?
• Sustainable design – Is the proposer committed to incorporating sustainable design principles in any construction projects it may undertake on behalf of the University, and in consultation with the University?”

Aramark is committed to working with the University of Manitoba to develop key environmental metrics that align with institutional sustainability goals. An annual report, summarizing sustainability programs and accomplishments, is provided to the University each year.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:

https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/334
Clothing (apparel such as shirts, pants, hats, etc.) - Fabric must be: certified organic natural fibers (ex. wool, cotton, linen), and/or highly renewable fibers (ex. bamboo, hemp), and/or low-impact recycled synthetic fibers (ex. polyester). Design and colour choices aimed at longevity rather than planned obsolescence. Garments to be easily laundered and thoroughly cleaned in cool water using environmentally preferable detergents and bleaches. Ensure your suppliers purchase from manufacturers that are committed to responsible manufacturing and if your company has developed a supplier code of conduct, provide the requirements and ensure the vendor complies to the code requirement. For added social and environmental benefit, consider purchasing clothing with a third-party certification, such as Fair Trade (FLO) or the Better Cotton Initiative.

Bags and tote bags - Fabric must be: certified organic natural fibers (ex. wool, cotton, linen), or highly renewable fibers (ex. bamboo, hemp), and/or low-impact recycled synthetic fibers (ex. polyester), For added social and environmental benefit, consider purchasing bags and totes with a third-party certification, such as Fair Trade (FLO) or the Better Cotton Initiative.

UM BookStore has a No Sweat Policy which states: At the Fort Garry BookStore we believe in fair labour practices. That's why we've implemented a No Sweat Policy. We require all vendors to follow the Fair Labor Association's Code of Conduct (PDF). Please note: our buyers will only purchase clothing from vendors and manufacturers who employ fair labour practices and require they follow the Fair Labor Association Workplace Code of Conduct (PDF). https://umanitoba.ca/bookstore/policies


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional service providers:

UM prefers professional service providers who show commitment to advancing sustainability. This standardized template for proposals requires service providers to outline what sustainable criteria they will incorporate into their service deliverables. The template specifically notes criteria in both sustainability and Indigenous (disadvantaged groups) representation.

Purchasing Services Master RFP Template, Section 4 - Proposal Requirements and Format, Sub-section 4.16 - Indigenous Well-Being states: The offeror shall prepare and submit Attachment K. The university is committed to considering all social, environmental and economic impacts of all its purchases. Identify, in reasonable detail, the Indigenous Initiatives your team will propose to incorporate into this project, providing examples of where your company and team members have undertaken similar initiatives on past projects, and/or any initiatives your organization is currently undertaking related to Indigenous issues and priorities in Canada through project-specific work or personal involvement.

Purchasing Services Master RFP Template, Section 4 - Proposal Requirements and Format, Sub-section 4.17 - Sustainable Initiatives states:
The Offeror shall prepare and submit Attachment L. The University is committed to considering all social, environmental and economic impacts of all its purchases. Identify, in reasonable detail, the sustainability aspects your team will propose to incorporate into this project, providing examples of where your company and team members have undertaken similar initiatives on past projects. The Purchasing Services Traditional Consulting RFP template references the University Sustainable Policy, which outlines the Institution’s commitment to sustainability including consideration of social, environmental and economic impacts of all its purchases.

The UM Sustainability Strategy 2019-2023 outlines its objectives regarding climate action, resource conservation and pollution prevention, ecological systems, Indigenous achievement and resurgence, wellness and accessibility, innovation and governance, teaching and learning, and community connection and engagement.https://umanitoba.ca/campus/sustainability/media/Sustainability_Strategy_2019-2023.pdf

Efficiency Manitoba Requirements (newest Crown Corporation replacing Manitoba Hydro Power Smart): UM is committed to improving the energy efficiency and the sustainability of our existing buildings. The Consultant is responsible for recommending any and all Efficiency Manitoba Commercial Energy Efficiency Assistance Program and financial incentives.

Building Performance & LEED Requirements - Specific projects require the consultant to meet or exceed the requirements of the Manitoba Green Building Program for Commercial and Institutional buildings. This requirement includes leading an integrated design process and aiming for LEED Silver Sustainable Design criteria designation.

https://www.manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/347
Electronic Waste Recycling Services (not fit for re-use) - To manage end-of-life electronics regulated under the Electrical and Electronic Equipment Stewardship Regulation, use the recyclers approved by Electronic Products Recycling Association (EPRA) Manitoba. To manage electronics not regulated under provincial legislation (no electronic handling fee paid at time of purchase), request the following of the vendor that accepts end-of-life electronics for recycling: be in compliance with all applicable legislation and permitted to accept and process e-waste and conform with the requirements set out by the Basel Convention, guarantee 100% proper and safe electronic waste recycling, certify equipment destruction, provide a summary report outlining the total weight of the electronics sent for recycling and the weight of the resources collected from the equipment, and provide the name and address of companies that receive the resources extracted from the e-waste.
https://manitobasustainableprocurement.com/node/361
Light Bulb Recycling - All light bulbs and components collected by the vendor must be recycled (including its packaging materials). Mercury, phosphor, and other chemicals must be extracted from the bulbs and reused. Metal components (brass, copper, tin, aluminum) must be separated and reused. Glass from light bulbs must be reused. The vendor shall provide a plan for the minimization of breakage that includes safe on-site collection, storage, and transportation of spent bulbs. The vendor shall provide the name and address of the end-user companies that receive the material extracted from the light bulbs. The vendor shall provide a summary report on an annual basis outlining the number and type of light bulbs collected and recycled, and the weight of each extracted material sent to end-user companies. The vendor must comply with all legislation and be permitted to accept and process/recycle light bulbs.

Batteries over 5kg - Vendors/suppliers responsible for recycling batteries over 5kg must be recycled through a steward approved by the Canadian Battery Association (CBA). A list of CBA-approved stewards can be found here: http://canadianbatteryassociation.ca/index.php/manitoba.
Batteries under 5kg - Consider implementing the Call2Recycle Battery Recycling program in your organization. For more information, go to: http://www.call2recycle.ca/manitoba/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:
---

Website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable procurement program or initiatives is available:
---

Additional documentation to support the submission:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.