Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 58.21
Liaison Jeannie Matheison
Submission Date Feb. 27, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Idaho
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Jeannie L. Matheison
Director
Sustainability Center
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a published strategic plan or equivalent guiding document that includes sustainability at a high level? :
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

The University of Idaho’s strategic plan, 2016-2025, addresses sustainability in a number of areas, most notably within the mission, and the principals and values sections of the document.

1. Two out of three pillars of sustainability, (environmental, social, economic), are identified as assets of our state, “The University of Idaho is the state’s land-grant research university. From this distinctive origin and identity comes our commitment to enhance the scientific, economic, social, legal and cultural assets of our state and to develop solutions for complex problems facing our society”. For more information see page four of the strategic plan at: http://www.uidaho.edu/provost/strategic-plan.

2. Sustainability is addressed as one of five guiding principles and values, “We embrace our personal and social obligation to ensure the sustainability of our future. For this community, ensuring a sustainable healthy lifestyle is part of a comprehensive desire to acknowledge stewardship of the natural environment to human interactions and well-being”. For more information see page seven of the strategic plan at: http://www.uidaho.edu/provost/strategic-plan.

3. GOAL 2 ENGAGE addresses sustainability: "Suggest and influence change that addresses societal needs and global issues and advances economic development and culture. Objective A: Inventory and continuously assess engagement programs and select new opportunities and methods that provide solutions for societal or global issues, support economic drivers and/or promote the advancement of culture."


A copy of the strategic plan:
The website URL where the strategic plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have a published sustainability plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
No

A copy of the sustainability plan:
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The website URL where the sustainability plan is publicly available:
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Does the institution have a published climate action plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
Yes

A copy of the climate action plan:
The website URL where the climate action plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have other published plans that address sustainability or include measurable sustainability objectives (e.g. campus master plan, physical campus plan, diversity plan, human resources plan)? :
Yes

A list of other published plans that address sustainability, including public website URLs (if available):

1. Long Range Campus Development Plan 2000 https://www.uidaho.edu/infrastructure/facilities/aes/campus-development-plan

2. Talloires Declaration
University Presidents for a Sustainable Future
http://ulsf.org/talloires-declaration/

3. The American College & University Presidents' Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)
https://secondnature.org/signatory-handbook/the-commitments/


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The university continues to be a signatory of two climate agreements, the Talloires Declaration (2005), and the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (2007). The University of Idaho is committed to incorporating sustainability and environmental literacy in teaching, research, operations, and outreach. Comprehensive plans in pursuit of climate neutrality, the Climate Action Plan (2010), and two iterations of the Greenhouse Gas Inventory (2008, 2011) set institutional goals and measure progress. A wide array of sustainable practices are currently in place, with ongoing efforts to expand and improve.

1.TALLOIRES DECLARATION: University Presidents for a Sustainable Future

We, the presidents, rectors, and vice chancellors of universities from all regions of the world are deeply concerned about the unprecedented scale and speed of environmental pollution and degradation, and the depletion of natural resources. Local, regional, and global air pollution; accumulation and distribution of toxic wastes; destruction and depletion of forests, soil, and water; depletion of the ozone layer and emission of "greenhouse" gases threaten the survival of humans and thousands of other living species, the integrity of the earth and its biodiversity, the security of nations, and the heritage of future generations. These environmental changes are caused by inequitable and unsustainable production and consumption patterns that aggravate poverty in many regions of the world.

We believe that urgent actions are needed to address these fundamental problems and reverse the trends. Stabilization of human population, adoption of environmentally sound industrial and agricultural technologies, reforestation, and ecological restoration are crucial elements in creating an equitable and sustainable future for all humankind in harmony with nature. Universities have a major role in the education, research, policy formation, and information exchange necessary to make these goals possible. The university heads must provide the leadership and support to mobilize internal and external resources so that their institutions respond to this urgent challenge. We, therefore, agree to take the following actions:

1. Use every opportunity to raise public, government, industry, foundation, and university awareness by publicly addressing the urgent need to move toward an environmentally sustainable future.

2. Encourage all universities to engage in education, research, policy formation, and information exchange on population, environment, and development to move toward a sustainable future.

3. Establish programs to produce expertise in environmental management, sustainable economic development, population, and related fields to ensure that all university graduates are environmentally literate and responsible citizens.

4. Create programs to develop the capability of university faculty to teach environmental literacy to all undergraduate, graduate, and professional school students.

5. Set an example of environmental responsibility by establishing programs of resource conservation, recycling, and waste reduction at the universities.

6. Encourage the involvement of government (at all levels), foundations, and industry in supporting university research, education, policy formation, and information exchange in environmentally sustainable development. Expand work with nongovernmental organizations to assist in finding solutions to environmental problems.

7. Convene school deans and environmental practitioners to develop research, policy, information exchange programs, and curricula for an environmentally sustainable future.

8. Establish partnerships with primary and secondary schools to help develop the capability of their faculty to teach about population, environment, and sustainable development issues.

9. Work with the UN Conference on Environmental and Development, the UN Environment Programme, and other national and international organizations to promote a worldwide university effort toward a sustainable future.

10. Establish a steering committee and a secretariat to continue this momentum and inform and support each other's efforts in carrying out this declaration.

http://ulsf.org/talloires-declaration/
______________________________________

2. The American College & University Presidents' Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) is a “high-visibility effort” to address global warming (global climate disruption) by creating a network of colleges and universities that have committed to neutralize their greenhouse gas emissions and accelerate the research and educational efforts of higher education to equip society to re-stabilize the earth’s climate.

The ACUPCC seeks to create connections with higher educational institutions in order to carry out two goals: The first is to make an agreement with these colleges and universities that they will commit to eliminate their net greenhouse gas emissions from specified campus operations. The second focuses on education and the institutions’ ability to promote research of sustainability programs and empower the "higher education sector to educate students, create solutions, and provide leadership-by-example for the rest of society." ACUPCC provides “a framework and support” for America’s colleges and universities. The ACUPCC relies on institutions of higher education to be role models for their communities as well as students, and to educate people who will contribute to fighting to reverse global warming and create a sustainable society.

https://secondnature.org/signatory-handbook/the-commitments/


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Research?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Research and the published plans in which each objective is included:

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2025
The strategic plan indirectly addresses measurable sustainability research objectives Goal 1. In support of Goal 1, the university's principals and values include excellence, respect, integrity, perseverance, and sustainability.

Goal 1: "Scholarly and creative products of the highest quality and scope, resulting in a significant positive impact for the region and the world" specifically address measurable objectives in section A.

Objective A states: Build a culture of collaboration that increases scholarly and creative productivity through interdisciplinary, regional, national and global partnerships.

Measurable Indicators: Increases in research expenditures and scholarly/creative works derived from collaborative partnerships.

Currently, 30% of research-producing departments are engaged in sustainability research.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2025
Measurable sustainability Campus Engagement objectives (p.10-11)

ENGAGE: Outreach that inspires innovation and culture

Objective A: Inventory and continuously assess engagement programs and select new opportunities and methods that provide solutions for societal or global issues, support economic drivers and/or promote the advancement of culture.

Indicators: Number of University of Idaho Extension direct contacts with communities.

Objective B: Develop community, regional, national and/or international collaborations which promote innovation and use University of Idaho research and creative expertise to address emerging issues.

Indicators: Number of active responses/programs in progress that seek to address the identified societal issues or collaborate with communities on research, the arts or cultural enhancement as reflected by the percentage of faculty collaboration with communities (reported in HERI survey) as well as total economic impact assessment
(EMSI).

Objective C: Engage individuals (alumni, friends, stakeholders and collaborators), businesses, industry, agencies and communities in meaningful and beneficial ways that support the University of Idaho’s mission.

Indicators: National Survey on Student Engagement (NSSE) service learning metric, alumni participation rate, and dual credit engagement.

Goal 2:
Suggest and influence change that addresses societal needs and global issues, and advances economic development and culture.

Additional, specific, measurable Campus Engagement objectives are on page 11 of the Strategic Plan.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2025
Measurable sustainability Public Engagement objectives (p.10-11)

ENGAGE: Outreach that inspires innovation and culture

Objective A: Inventory and continuously assess engagement programs and select new opportunities and methods that provide solutions for societal or global issues, support economic drivers and/or promote the advancement of culture.

Indicators: Number of University of Idaho Extension direct contacts with communities.

Objective B: Develop community, regional, national and/or international collaborations which promote innovation and use University of Idaho research and creative expertise to address emerging issues.

Indicators: Number of active responses/programs in progress that seek to address the identified societal issues or collaborate with communities on research, the arts or cultural enhancement as reflected by the percentage of faculty collaboration with communities (reported in HERI survey) as well as total economic impact assessment
(EMSI).

Objective C: Engage individuals (alumni, friends, stakeholders and collaborators), businesses, industry, agencies and communities in meaningful and beneficial ways that support the University of Idaho’s mission.

Indicators: National Survey on Student Engagement (NSSE) service learning metric, alumni participation rate, and dual credit engagement.

Goal 2:
Suggest and influence change that addresses societal needs and global issues, and advances economic development and culture.

Additional, specific, measurable objectives are shown on page 11 of the Strategic Plan.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate and the published plans in which each objective is included:

CLIMATE ACTION PLAN
Air & Climate (p.6 )

In March 2007, the University of Idaho signed the American Colleges and Universities Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). As a signatory, the University committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions significantly in the short‐term, and to dramatically reduce GHG emissions and offset the remainder over the long‐term. In addition to the long‐term goal of climate neutrality, ACUPCC requires the following actions:

1. Develop a comprehensive plan to achieve climate neutrality as soon as possible. The climate action plan, published in 2010, is the first iteration of that effort.

2. Initiate two or more tangible actions to reduce GHG emissions in the short‐term while a more comprehensive plan is being developed. To meet this obligation, the University implemented the following actions:

a. GREEN BUILDING POLICY: A policy requiring that all new campus construction will be built to at least the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Silver standard was established in January 2008.

b. WASTE MINIMIZATION: A number of efforts were initiated to minimize waste, including joining the national RecycleMania competition, developing tailgate recycling at football games and other sporting events, and expanding e‐waste recycling on campus. Additional waste minimization activities are currently being developed as part of the President’s Strategic Innovation Initiative and the University’s Strategic Action Plan.

3. Make publicly available the University’s Climate Action Plan and GHG inventory, including periodic progress reports, through the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). The University of Idaho Greenhouse Gas Assessment was submitted to AASHE in September 2008, followed by this report—the University of Idaho Climate Action Plan—in January 2010.

In Spring 2009, the University of Idaho Sustainability Committee set 2030 as University's target date for climate neutrality. To keep the University on pace for this goal, the committee also set the following intermediate targets: 25% reduction in emissions by 2012, 50% reduction in emissions by 2016, and 82% reduction in emissions by 2023.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings and the published plans in which each objective is included:

CLIMATE ACTION PLAN
Buildings (p.12-17)

In 2007, the University of Idaho emitted 38,981 metric tons of CO2e greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, 80% of which resulted from electricity and natural gas usage. To reach our emission reduction targets, considerable decreases in electricity and natural gas use will be required. The following is a list of potential projects and policy measures that will help reduce electricity and natural gas use at the University.

A complete list of Sustainability objectives that address Buildings are in the Climate Action Plan, pp. 12-17. A partial list is shown below.

BUILDING ENERGY USE REDUCTION PROJECTS

The Performance Contract includes large, capital projects (such as steam plant improvements) and campus‐wide projects (such as lighting upgrades) with a payback of 25 years or less. Once completed, other efforts will be needed to add smaller projects and projects with longer payback periods:

1. Increase the resolution of building modeling completed by McKinstry. The initial E‐Quest modeling provided enough resolution to look at major HVAC projects. A more detailed model will allow planning for additional projects not identified in the first effort.

2. Change the management of buildings to result in additional reductions. This effort could include the following measures:

a. Concentrate classes after 5pm into as few buildings as possible, allowing night setback
operations to be implemented in all other buildings.

b. Add a “space czar” staff position and empower that person to allocate space more efficiently. This position would also develop policies to combine and minimize server rooms needing extra cooling (or locate servers on outside walls to utilize outside air instead of chilled water), and to reduce impacts from labs with fume hoods. Buildings with labs use double to triple the heating energy of other buildings.

c. Optimize the use of automated environmental controls. Inefficiencies currently result from how buildings are being managed. d. Firmly enforce State of Idaho standards for managing building temperatures as required by State of Idaho Executive Order 2005‐12.

e. Select a campus building and pilot the LEED Existing Building Operations and Maintenance
process (with a focus on Energy and Atmosphere credits) to assess the practicality of the
program for campus‐wide implementation.

3. Develop, distribute, and follow up on energy reports for specific campus operations. Develop site‐
specific energy reduction plans for operations with staff.

4. Fund Energy Efficiency/Conservation Specialists through the Utility Budget. Currently, all funding for electrical, HVAC controls, and maintenance and operations personnel comes from the Facilities budget.

Employee priorities are thereby focused on general maintenance and avoidance of occupant complaints. With the many maintenance needs on campus, this often results in little time spent managing and optimizing HVAC and electrical systems for energy efficiency. In addition, a conflict can occur between energy conservation efforts and occupant satisfaction; it is common for maintenance personnel to ignore energy conservation in favor of occupant preferences. If dedicated individuals are not appointed, the University loses out on energy savings developed through the Performance Contract and will have difficulty capitalizing on future energy‐savings opportunities.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy and the published plans in which each objective is included:

CLIMATE ACTION PLAN
Energy (p.12-17)

In 2007, the University of Idaho emitted 38,981 metric tons of CO2e greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, 80% of which resulted from electricity and natural gas usage. To reach our emission reduction targets, considerable decreases in electricity and natural gas use will be required. The following is a list of potential projects and policy measures that will help reduce electricity and natural gas use at the University.

A complete list of Sustainability objectives that address Energy are in the Climate Action Plan, pp. 12-17. A partial list is shown below.

CAMPUS‐WIDE PROJECTS

The central steam system which supports heating and cooling for 75% of campus buildings is more efficient than individual building‐level heating and cooling systems. A number of projects are being evaluated or are underway to expand and improve this system:

1. Connect more buildings to the central steam system to eliminate electricity and natural gas use for heating and cooling isolated buildings. As part of the ESCO process, the Menard Law building will be connected to the steam tunnel system, thereby eliminating the current electrical heat system. The challenge with extending the steam system is cost, which is roughly $5,000 per linear foot.

2. Compare steam pressure supply to actual pressure needed at buildings serviced by steam. If the current delivery pressure is excessive, decrease the pressure to the lowest level required for the delivery of needed downstream pressure. This project is currently underway.

3. Determine if any independent air compressors are still operating in university buildings. If so, remove these compressors and connect the buildings to the central steam system whenever possible. Connecting these air systems to the central air system will allow the one main compressor at the steam plant to handle all air needs more efficiently, using less electricity than small compressors scattered all over campus.

4. Add an additional wood‐fired boiler to the steam plant facility. This will eliminate most natural gas use at the steam plant (emergencies or major breakdown backup only).

a. Estimated cost of $26,000,000.

b. Yearly Emissions Reduction of 3,412 Metric Tons CO2e.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining and the published plans in which each objective is included:

CLIMATE ACTION PLAN
Food Waste (p.18)

Compost all food waste from campus.

The University began composting food waste generated by campus dining operations in January 2010. Several other coffee shops and food vendor locations generate small amounts of food waste. Composting services will be extended to these smaller locations once the two larger food waste stream operations are well established.

Minimum Waste Catering – Starting in Fall 2009, University Catering moved to a minimum waste catering system using reusable or compostable plates, flatware, and other serving utensils.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds and the published plans in which each objective is included:

LONG RANGE CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT PLAN
LAND USE (p.8)

Recognize the reciprocal relationship between land uses, transportation systems, and the natural terrain by locating the major parking resources at periphery locations to protect the concentrated pedestrian use of the core of campus. (e.g. residence hall parking, Kibbie parking; Sweet Avenue parking); developing an intra-campus transit/shuttle system with stops at key locations in relationship to major land-use areas; encouraging increased use of bicycles and pedestrian travel modes to and from campus; utilizing open space, terrain and vegetation patterns as natural determinants when establishing new systems or zones.

LONG RANGE CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT PLAN
OPEN SPACE (p.15)

Increase campus-wide tree plantings, especially street tree plantings by: identifying and making an inventory of all tree plantings across campus; creating a tree replacement plan for aging, diseased, and damaged trees; planting street trees along Nez Perce Drive; planting street trees along Perimeter Drive; planting trees along Hello Walk on the Administration Lawn to replace aging trees.

Develop greenbelts and linear parks along campus edges and transition zones in collaboration with the City of Moscow by: developing transition zones that connect and integrate effectively with adjacent areas; actively participating in city committees involved in enhancing these areas.

Develop riparian and natural habitats as part of the open space framework by: realigning and re-landscaping the Sweet Avenue reach of Paradise Creek; rerouting and re-landscaping the reach of Paradise Creek from Line Street to the Greenhouse Drive “extension”; working collaboratively with non-profit agencies and natural resource classes to implement relevant projects in the campus landscape.

Develop and implement standards and methods for selecting, installing, and maintaining art in open spaces.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Climate Action Plan (p.18)

Office furnishings – Move to standardized office furnishings made of durable wood or metal that will be kept or re‐sold back to campus users at a reduced price. Eliminate the use of inexpensive particle board furniture that breaks apart and cannot be reused.

Minimum Waste Catering – Starting in Fall 2009, University Catering moved to a minimum waste catering system using reusable or compostable plates, flatware, and other serving utensils. This program has declined in effectiveness and needs to be re-addressed.

Recycled Paper – The University of Idaho adopted a policy requiring the use of a minimum 30% recycled‐content paper for on‐campus multipurpose paper purchases, and the policy encourages the purchase and use of 100% post‐consumer, recycled‐content paper.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation and the published plans in which each objective is included:

LONG RANGE CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT PLAN (pp. 6-11)

TRANSPORTATION

Effectively blend the university’s transportation systems (vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian) into the surrounding community systems by: participating in Pullman/Moscow Corridor and Hwy 95 bypass plans to ease safety and congestion concerns, and to ensure appropriate protection of UI interests; creating a bike path/linear park in the railroad corridor from Line Street to Perimeter Drive; developing a bike path/linear park at Sweet Avenue and northeast of St. Augustine’s Center.

Support community-based mass transit where feasible, appropriate, and cost-effective, and link it effectively with campus shuttle systems by: developing innovative shuttle buses to and from the east and west campus parking resources to the core of campus; connecting campus systems effectively to other transit options external to the campus.

Develop alternatives to traditional, single occupancy vehicles as the primary means of transportation access to campus by: expanding bicycle parking options, including covered bike parking and lockers; encouraging carpooling and/or vanpooling; providing on-demand transit service for late-night use; developing incentives for students to leave cars in assigned areas or where feasible, at their Moscow place of residence.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Climate Action Plan

The University of Idaho produces approximately 1,500 tons of waste per year, resulting in the release of 242 metric tons of CO2e into the atmosphere from the decomposition and transportation of waste. To reduce waste‐related emissions, UI must minimize the amount of overall waste produced and recycled.

A partial list of objectives that address Waste (pp. 18-19).

• Paper reduction – Increase duplex copying on campus. ITS will start a pilot program using
duplex mode as the default printing option for several University computer labs this spring.
Many departments are already shifting to an electronic‐only format for documents. This
practice needs to be encouraged and accelerated.

• Office furnishings – Move to standardized office furnishings made of durable wood or metal that will be kept or re‐sold back to campus users at a reduced price. Eliminate the use of inexpensive particle board furniture that breaks apart and cannot be reused.

• Education and Outreach – Expand educational and service‐learning projects concerning
recycling. This includes offering a free waste audit and consulting program to help offices and departments reduce waste, implementing and advertising a recycling program at sporting
events, and other measures. Tailgate recycling at football games was launched this year, and
recycling inside Kibbie Dome was piloted during the last game of the 2009 football season.

• Food Waste – Compost all food waste from campus. The University began composting food
waste from campus dining operations and from the Commons in January 2010. Several other
coffee shops and food vendor locations generate small amounts of food waste. Composting
services will be extended to these smaller locations once the two larger food waste stream
operations are well established.

• Minimum Waste Catering – Starting in Fall 2009, University Catering moved to a minimum waste
catering system using reusable or compostable plates, flatware, and other serving utensils.

• Recycled Paper – The University of Idaho is in the process of developing a policy requiring the use of a minimum 30% recycled‐content paper for on‐campus multipurpose paper purchases,
and the policy will also encourage the purchase and use of 100% post‐consumer, recycled‐
content paper.

• Bottled Water – Reduce the use of disposable water bottles. A reusable water bottle campaign was launched in Fall 2009. UISC and the Office of the Dean of Students gave stainless steel water bottles to every incoming freshman and graduate student.

• Electronics and E‐waste – Starting in 2010, E‐waste will be banned from the landfill in Oregon where we ship our waste. E‐waste is now recycled through University Surplus. E‐waste is defined as anything with a plug, battery, or microchip. Containers for small electronics have already been distributed by the University's Sustainability Center, and Surplus already processes approximately 25 tons of computers and monitors per year. These efforts will be expanded in 2010. The leasing of electronic equipment should be evaluated in terms of the total cost of ownership of equipment in comparison to our current purchase and recycle practice.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Water?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Water and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Long range campus development plan (pp. 27-29)

WATER

As the main campus of the University of Idaho in Moscow grows to support increased enrollment and other initiatives of the university’s strategic plan, the campus-wide utilities infrastructure system must also grow and keep pace. The University of Idaho plans, constructs, operates, and maintains many of its own utilities and infrastructure. Since the university’s Moscow campus is a large land expanse located in a rural area, the university cannot depend upon the city, county, or other agencies or districts for most of its utility and infrastructure funding. This makes the university unique among institutions of higher education within the state of Idaho. The university has fiscal and operational responsibilities for steam generation and distribution and electrical energy distribution. It also maintains its own domestic water wells, water storage and distribution of water systems, reclaimed water collection, treatment and distribution, and chilled water production and distribution. Sanitary sewage collection and delivery to the community treatment facility, stormwater collection, treatment, and discharge are also part of UI’s vast utility infrastructure networks.

Concurrent with fiscal and operational responsibilities for these systems comes responsibility for stewardship of campus assets and responsibility to operate the systems in a manner that ensures the health and life safety of the university community. Planning to
provide adequate available capacity to support the university’s needs requires timely design and construction of projects to deliver adequate infrastructure capacity. Further, operation of the infrastructure systems in a safe, efficient, and economical fashion are all critical to the support of the vision, goals, and missions of the University of Idaho.

Make timely investments to preserve and extend basic features of the campus heating and cooling systems, by:

• providing additional steam capacity in accordance with the adopted capital strategy and LRCDP;
• constructing two new chilled water production facilities and connecting them into a district system with other existing sites for optimal economy of scale and diversity benefits;
• renewing the original power plant building(s) to protect its basic condition and the value of the equipment housed in it and to visually unify the separate industrial-style plant
additions.

Work collaboratively with the City of Moscow to achieve a major upgrade to the shared sewage treatment plant, by:

• seeking innovative, cost-effective ways to reduce capital costs;
• managing the use of reclaimed water to reduce the overall size of the treatment plant;
• separating stormwater systems from sanitary sewer systems to eliminate infiltration.

Achieve the intent of the City of Moscow’s adopted stormwater ordinance, by:

• creating additional wetland treatment cells where needed;
• metering the flow of stormwater to ensure that runoff rate is within established limits;
• aggressively pretreating runoff, especially in parking lots, prior to discharge to Paradise Creek;
• coordinating campus projects with the Watershed Advisory Group that oversees the regional use of the shared aquifer.

Increase the use of reclaimed water by extending systems into major irrigation areas to reduce the reliance on domestic water sources, by:

• adding lagoon storage capacity to serve large fields, park areas and greenbelts;
• extending the reclaimed water irrigation system to the Administration Lawn;
• extending the reclaimed water irrigation system to the new soccer and football practice fields.

Ensure that all water systems throughout campus are adequate to meet fire flow adequacy, laboratory water separation and domestic needs.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Strategic Plan:

CULTIVATE A valued and diverse community (p. 14).
Goal 4: Foster an inclusive, diverse community of students, faculty and staff and improve cohesion and morale

Objective A: Build an inclusive, diverse community that welcomes multicultural and international perspectives.

Indicators: Increased multicultural student enrollment, international student enrollment, percent of multicultural faculty and staff.

Objective B: Enhance the University of Idaho’s ability to compete for and retain outstanding scholars and skilled staff.

Indicators: Improved job satisfaction scores and reduced staff turnover rate.

Objective C: Improve efficiency, transparency and communication.

Indicators: Invest resources wisely to enhance end-user experiences (e.g. more customer service oriented) and maintain affordability for students (cost per credit hour and SBOE efficiency measure).

Additional, specific, performance measures are shown on page 15 of the Strategic Plan.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance and the published plans in which each objective is included:
---

Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Strategic Plan:

CULTIVATE A valued and diverse community (p. 14).
Goal 4: Foster an inclusive, diverse community of students, faculty and staff and improve cohesion and morale

Objective A: Build an inclusive, diverse community that welcomes multicultural and international perspectives.

Indicators: Increased multicultural student enrollment, international student enrollment, percent of multicultural faculty and staff.

Objective B: Enhance the University of Idaho’s ability to compete for and retain outstanding scholars and skilled staff.

Indicators: Improved job satisfaction scores and reduced staff turnover rate.

Objective C: Improve efficiency, transparency and communication.

Indicators: Invest resources wisely to enhance end-user experiences (e.g. more customer service oriented) and maintain affordability for students (cost per credit hour and SBOE efficiency measure).

Additional, specific, performance measures are shown on page 15 of the Strategic Plan.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas (e.g. arts and culture or technology)?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The LONG RANGE CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT PLAN, addresses ART, "Develop and implement standards and methods for selecting, installing, and maintaining art in open spaces".


Does the institution have a formal statement in support of sustainability endorsed by its governing body (e.g. a mission statement that specifically includes sustainability and is endorsed by the Board of Trustees)? :
Yes

The formal statement in support of sustainability:

The University of Idaho’s strategic plan addresses sustainability in a number of areas, most notably within the mission, and the principals and values sections of the document, "We embrace our personal and social obligation to ensure the sustainability of our future. For this community, ensuring a sustainable healthy lifestyle is part of a comprehensive desire to acknowledge stewardship of the natural environment to human interactions and well-being."


The institution’s definition of sustainability (e.g. as included in a published statement or plan):
---

Is the institution an endorser or signatory of the following? :
Yes or No
The Earth Charter No
The Higher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI) No
ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter No
Second Nature’s Carbon Commitment (formerly known as the ACUPCC), Resilience Commitment, and/or integrated Climate Commitment Yes
The Talloires Declaration (TD) Yes
UN Global Compact No
Other multi-dimensional sustainability commitments (please specify below) No

A brief description of the institution’s formal sustainability commitments, including the specific initiatives selected above:

The university continues to be a signatory of two climate agreements, the Talloires Declaration (2005), and the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (2007). The University of Idaho is committed to incorporating sustainability and environmental literacy in teaching, research, operations, and outreach.

Comprehensive plans in pursuit of climate neutrality, the Climate Action Plan (2010), and two iterations of the Greenhouse Gas Inventory (2008, 2011) set institutional goals and measure progress. A wide array of sustainable practices are currently in place, with ongoing efforts to expand and improve, including a third iteration of the Greenhouse Gas Inventory, the first STARS submission, and a forthcoming CAP update.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.