Overall Rating Bronze
Overall Score 29.22
Liaison Navin Tagore-Erwin
Submission Date March 3, 2022

STARS v2.2

University of Hawaii Maui College
PA-3: Inclusive and Participatory Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.00 / 3.00 Meagan Jones
SSM Faculty
Sustainable Science Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have formal participatory or shared governance bodies through which the following stakeholders can regularly participate in the governance of the institution?:
Yes or No
Students Yes
Academic staff Yes
Non-academic staff Yes

A brief description of the institution’s formal participatory or shared governance bodies:

UHMC participates in shared governance through its Academic Senate and Student Government.

The Associated Students of University of Hawaii Maui College (ASUHMC), seek to represent and honor the voice of every student at Maui College. This Council is committed to creating a dynamic student life on campus. The events and activities that we plan will be focused on providing fun and educational opportunities for our students. ASUHMC is also committed to the ethical administering of student fees which includes obtaining input from all students.

The Academic Senate is the policy recommending body of the University of Hawaii Maui College's (UHMC) academic community. It has the responsibility of advising the Administration on all proposed changes in the policies of the College. In recommending policy for consideration by the Board of Regents, the Senate has the responsibility to speak on behalf of the faculty and Administrative Professional Technical personnel (APT) of the academic community. The Senate promotes communication and mutual understanding among the faculty, staff, students, administration and academic system committees.


Total number of individuals on the institution’s highest governing body:
11

Number of students representing their peers as official members of the institution’s highest governing body:
1

Number of academic staff representing their peers as official members of the institution’s highest governing body:
0

Number of non-academic staff representing their peers as official members of the institution’s highest governing body:
0

Number of women serving as official members of the institution’s highest governing body:
2

Percentage of official members of the highest governing body that are women:
18.18

Website URL where information about the institution’s highest governing body may be found:
Does the institution host or support one or more formal bodies through which external stakeholders have a regular voice in institutional decisions that affect them?:
No

A brief description of the campus-community council or equivalent body that gives external stakeholders a regular voice in institutional decisions that affect them:
---

Number of people from underrepresented groups serving as official members of the institution’s highest governing body.:
---

Website URL where information about the institution’s governance structure is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Data Sources:
http://maui.hawaii.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/AdvisoryCommitteeHandbook_Aug2016.pdf

http://maui.hawaii.edu/faculty-staff/academic-senate/

http://maui.hawaii.edu/studentlife/student-government/

https://www.hawaii.edu/leadership/

Community engagement body: CTE Advisory Committee
The primary purpose of the Advisory Committee is to promote collaboration between specific educational programs and employers in the local community. Career and technical education (CTE) programs and associated outreach centers are designed to prepare students with skills, knowledge, and approaches to enter the workforce in an occupational area.

The advisory committee serves as advisors to the college, providing curriculum recommendations and support for quality CTE programs and have no administrative or legislative authority. Working cooperatively with program administrators and instructors, advisory committees can significantly help strengthen and improve programs they serve. The success of workforce education programs depends, to a large extent, upon the activity and involvement of advisory committees

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.