Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 75.41
Liaison Dave Newport
Submission Date March 23, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Colorado Boulder
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Heid VanGenderen
Chief Sustainability Officer
University of Colorado Boulder
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a published strategic plan or equivalent guiding document that includes sustainability at a high level? :
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

In numerous places and in numerous ways both explicitly and implicitly, environmental dimensions of sustainability are incorporated into the strategic plan, Flagship 2030. For instance: "All facilities will be constructed with materials and methods emphasizing sustainability and environmental awareness, consistent with the university’s longtime commitment to the environment." [page 55]
Again, in numerous ways, social dimensions of sustainability are supported in the strategic plan. For instance, "As we add new [faculty] positions, we will also identify and implement strategies for enhancing our faculty diversity. A significant increase in new and diverse faculty will help us remain competitive in the quality of teaching and the educational experience for undergraduate, graduate, and professional students." [page 33]
Indeed, social elements are part of two of the core initiatives in the plan:
1) Learning for a Diverse World. Implement new strategies for improving diversity; foster a supportive and inclusive climate for all.
8. Serving Colorado, the Community, and Our Graduates. Expand outreach programming aimed at Colorado communities; enhance opportunities for lifelong and distance learning.
Likewise, both social and financial sustainability principles are detailed in the strategic plan. For instance, "We will enhance student financial support by doubling both merit and need-based financial aid within the next five years; we will initiate a statewide dialogue on how
Colorado can expand access to higher education.
CU-Boulder is committed to recruiting outstanding students from a diverse talent pool throughout the state, the nation, and the world. In particular, we want to provide access for qualified Colorado residents, regardless of their ability to pay.
Although financial aid has been the fastest-growing budget item for the past four years, we still lag behind our peers in overall funds available to help attract the best
students. Clearly, we need to increase our financial aid investment if we are to compete for outstanding undergraduate students. At the graduate level, we also
must enhance stipends, health care, and housing to recruit top-tier graduate students. Our overall recruitment strategies must reflect our intent to build a
diverse student body that is more representative of the world today and tomorrow." [page 37]


A copy of the strategic plan:
---

The website URL where the strategic plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have a published sustainability plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
Yes

A copy of the sustainability plan:
---

The website URL where the sustainability plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have a published climate action plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
Yes

A copy of the climate action plan:
---

The website URL where the climate action plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have other published plans that address sustainability or include measurable sustainability objectives (e.g. campus master plan, physical campus plan, diversity plan, human resources plan)? :
Yes

A list of other published plans that address sustainability, including public website URLs (if available):
Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum and the published plans in which each objective is included:

In addition to the physical campus sustainability plan in the CMP are the policy and curriculum elements cited in the Environmental Center plan. Element One, part 2 of the EC plan details goals and objectives as follows:

2.2. Objective: Facilitate and enhance opportunity for students to
participate and learn experientially
2.2.a. Implement sustainable food systems with student learning capacity at all stages
2.2.b. Present at orientation trainings for incoming lab department graduate students
2.2.c. Mentor research/ senior thesis projects
2.2.d. Support faculty that need service-learning and civic engagement opportunities
2.2.e. Provide listing of opportunities in the Boulder community

Housing and Dining's plan provides specific sustainability delieverable through their Residential Academic Programs as follows:

Residential Academic Programs
Students live together in the same residence hall, share academic experiences by participating in in-hall seminar classes, have access to faculty offices on-site and engage in residence hall activities that reinforce the academic theme. The program is coordinated by a faculty director, and is generally focused on first-year students.

RAP features
Program is for entire academic year
Enhanced academic curriculum
Full-time faculty director
Classroom space in the residence hall
Enhanced program activities
$850 per year fee associated with all RAPs
Baker RAP—Interdisciplinary curriculum in the natural sciences, pre-health and environmental studies.

CMCI/Communication and Society RAP—Explore complex social problems and challenges of communication in contemporary society.

Engineering Honors RAP—Provide educational experiences that match the abilities and ambitions of some of the very best students at CU.

Farrand RAP—Emphasis on liberal arts, particularly humanities and cultural studies, taught by award-winning faculty.

Global Engineering RAP—Focus on engineering and Spanish.

Global Studies RAP—Focused on global interdependencies and promoting international understanding.

Health Professions RAP—Emphasis on academic preparation for careers in the health professions.

Honors RAP—Provide a high-powered, intellectual environment while combining the community of a small liberal arts college with the advantages of a large research university.

Leeds RAP—Focus on becoming a well-rounded, prepared and engaged global leader equipped to succeed in twenty-first century workplaces.

Libby Arts RAP—Interdisciplinary curriculum in the arts, including visual arts, theater and dance, music and film studies.

Pre-Business RAP—First-year students pursuing a business degree but not yet admitted into the Leeds School of Business.

Sewall RAP—Engage complex connections between the present and the past, between local places and our global society and between the arts and sciences.

Likewise, curriculum is specifically addressed in the Environmental Studies curriculum foci. Several curriculum tracks are offered including, Climate, Energy, Natural Resources, Public Health and Sustainable Development.

Taken together, the campuses various plans and foci offer broad and across the board sustainability planning and curriculum assets.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Research?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Research and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The EC plan and others detail Research sustainability goals and objectives as follows:
Goal: Integrate sustainability into laboratory research environment
5.1. Objective: Establish a culture where lab members include conservation in daily decision making (such as experimental design, purchasing, and grant writing)
5.2 Objective: Establish an atmosphere where lab departments include sustainability in their educational and research plans
5.2,a. Including discussion/presentations in courses and seminar series
5.2.b. Setting departmental sustainability goals
5.2.c. Establishing a culture encouraging shared assets and spaces
5.3 Objective: Establish ways to outreach to new lab research faculty, lab staff, and graduate students as they arrive on campus
5.4 Objective: Develop a Green Labs Certification Process
5.5 Objective: Connect our leadership in research on the impact of human activity on the natural & built environment, and our leadership on the development of green energy alternatives, with the need for conservation of resources within our labs
5.6 Objective: Increase awareness and promote collaboration with other campus administration offices (Deans, VC for Research, OCG, Procurement, Controller’s Office)


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The EC plan specifically lists objectives for engagment as follows:
Goal: Expand co-curricular experiential learning opportunities that engage students through a sustainability focus
2.1. Objective: Facilitate the opportunity for every student to participate in campus sustainability through the E-Center (ENVS, business, engineering)
2.1.a. Design and/or refine a program to engage students in personal sustainability plans
2.1.b. Plan events that are of interest to variety of majors
2.1.c. Conduct targeted outreach to engineering, business
2.1.d. Strengthen Leeds-EC sustainability innovation project
2.1.e. Strengthen sustainability sessions at orientation
2.1.f. Integrate EC sustainability projects into Residential Academic Programs
2.1.g. Seek to integrate the EC as an affiliated center with the emerging “College of Sustainability”
2.1.h. Map co-curricular support opportunities to College of Sustainability academic objectives


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The EC plan specifically lists objectives for public engagment as follows:
Goal: Strengthen town-gown relationships and synergies
1.1. Objective: Serve as the resource center for on and off campus sustainability requests
1.1.a. Create community involvement and FAQ page on EC website
1.1.b. Consistently submit items to CU Outreach and Engagement site
1.1.c. Promote public commitments and accomplishments
1.1.d. Conduct presentations at conferences
1.1.e. Attain student and staff representation on governing bodies and advisory councils
1.1.f Connect the campus community with the broader community in relation to access to sustainable food
1.2. Objective: Engage students in service projects in the community
1.2.a. Collaborate with VRC
1.2.b. Widely share volunteer opportunity listings
1.2.c. Increase SCORE program
1.2.d. Increase community connections of Environmental Justice program
1.2.e. Create virtual toxic tour of Colorado
1.2.f. Expand computers to youth
1.2.g. Form ongoing discussion groups; culminate these with EJ week and service projects
1.2.h. Collaborate with community organizations for increased service placement opportunities
1.3. Objective: Develop and maintain strong connections with diverse communities
1.3.a. Expand environmentally preferable purchasing practices to include women and minority-owned businesses.
1.3.b. Provide multi-lingual information and materials


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Campus Master Plan Sustainability section calls for specific objectives that advance air and climate issues including:
• All new and renovated facilities shall attain LEED
Gold “Plus” certification, which is diving more deeply
into the energy and water conservation categories of
the LEED requirements, including projected performance
at a minimum level of 45 percent better than
ASHRAE standards.
• CU-Boulder will utilize the STARS rating to outline
opportunities for the campus to improve in building
maintenance and operations, clean and renewable energy, and waste reduction.
• CU-Boulder will re-submit to STARS when changes
identified in the gap analysis have been implemented.
4. Energy Efficiency and Carbon
Reduction
The manner in which CU-Boulder produces and consumes
energy directly affects sustainability and carbon
neutrality goals. About 80 percent of CU-Boulder’s
reported greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are from the
combustion of fuels for heat, power, and chilled water.
Conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable fuel
sources are among the best methods to reduce these
emissions. The utility infrastructure must strive for a balance
between costs, conservation, and carbon through
“greener” energy solutions.
The Main Campus energy system has the potential to
become less carbon intense with the development of viable
renewable energy fuel sources (e.g., cogeneration,
solar PV, geothermal, synthetic gas, and biomass).
Goals:
• Reduce total energy consumption (BTU/ft2
) by 20
percent by 2012 based on a 2005 baseline.
• Reduce total (Scopes 1, 2, and selected scope 31)
GHG emissions (Metric Tons CO2/year) by 20 percent
by 2020 based on a 2005 baseline.
Guidelines:
• Designate 15 to 25 acres of land potentially on CUBoulder
South for the development of large-scale
renewable energy systems such as solar PV, solar
thermal, and other emerging technologies. This site
could be co-located with solar greenhouses used
to produce local organic food for the campus while
providing a research showcase and robust renewable
energy facility. Smaller-scale renewable energy
projects can be accommodated on campus.
• Utilize information from the STARS gap analysis for
improvement in opportune areas such as building
operations and maintenance, specifically prioritizing
LEED EB level renovations and maintenance standards
of the campus’s aging building inventory.
• Utilize information learned from the STARS gap
analysis to improve in the areas of clean and renewable
energy and waste reduction to help overall campus
goals of reducing GHG emissions, and eventually
achieving carbon neutrality.
• Plan to include utility corridors (similar to land easements)
for all utilities as well as designated land use
for central plants. (See Sustainable Buildings (Sec-tion III.A.2) for net-zero goals and energy efficient
building).


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The Campus Master Plan Sustainability Section specifically requires 'sustainable buildings' and their attributes as follows:

2. Sustainable Buildings
Campuses have a significant impact on the built and
natural environment and are under increasing pressure
from governments, students, and community members
to carefully mitigate their environmental footprint. CUBoulder
is no exception. Nationally, campus development
initiatives are factoring in the economic and social
needs of surrounding neighborhoods and incorporating
design elements that contribute to environmental health
as well as architectural aesthetics. New approaches are
propelled by a valuable insight: what’s good for the community
is good for the campus.
With this in mind, this Campus Master Plan incorporates
smart growth principles along with sustainable building
practices to ensure that efficient, appropriate, and
low-impact growth occurs over the next 10 years, aiding
in the university’s larger efforts of eventually reaching
carbon neutrality.
Goals:
• Strengthen community ties by providing opportunities
for connectivity in the design of buildings and
outdoor spaces that are compatible with community
interests.
• Control costs and the outward expansion of the
campus, by designing campus buildings in a way that
facilitates renovation or reconfiguration for alternate
future uses, incorporates flexible core and shell, provides
adaptable infrastructure that allows for future
change without major reconstruction, and installs
systems and equipment that are flexible.
• Reduce campus and community environmental
impacts, by attempting to locate new facilities with
diverse heating and cooling load demands in proximity
to take advantage of energy recovery options
(e.g., consolidated data centers as a heat generator),
renewable options such as geothermal systems, and
incorporating highly efficient district heating and
cooling plants.
• Design and locate buildings and infrastructure to
allow for easy access for improved serviceability and
access for services such as routine maintenance,
recycling, composting, and other building services
needs.
Guidelines:
• All new buildings and major renovations are built to a
LEED Gold Standard plus extra attention is focused
on energy and water credits (CU-Boulder’s term of
LEED Gold “Plus”). This helps ensure that buildings
are as energy and water conserving as possible
and provide the greatest long-term payback for
the investments made. Each project should strive
to achieve performance at a minimum level of 45
percent better than the ASHRAE standards in place
at the time of the project’s construction.
• Ensure that all new and renovated facilities underway
(those with formal Program Plan approval) be near
net-zero energy facilities. A net-zero energy facility
collects as much energy from renewable sources as
the facility uses on an annual basis while maintaining
an acceptable level of service and functionality.
Buildings can exchange energy with the power grid
as long as the net energy balance is zero on an annual
basis.
• Install visible energy monitoring devices on buildings
and make information available to inform and help
occupants track conservation behaviors.
• As appropriate, plan and construct facilities that
intertwine indoor space with nature to capitalize on
the benefits of biophilic design—the term is derived
from biophilia, coined in 1984 by a Harvard biologist,
Edward O. Wilson, to describe what he considered
the innate human attraction to nature—that incorporates
real or simulated natural elements in an effort to
promote well-being.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Yes, the Climate Action Plan submitted to the ACUPCC specifically calls for the integration of energy conservation and renewable supplies as follows:

• Governor’s Executive Order Phase (2009–2012)
□ Goal: 20 percent energy, vehicle fuel, and materials reduction by 2012
• Phase 1, Conservation and Cogeneration (2010–2020)
□ Goal: 20 percent GHG reduction by 2020
• Phase 2, Large-Scale Renewables (2020–2030)
□ Goal: 50 percent GHG reduction by 2030
• Phase 3, Innovative Technologies (2030+)
□ Goal: 80 percent GHG reduction by 2050


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Housing & Dinings Sustainable Dining Initiative includes several objectives such as:

Food Sourcing
Procure organic source for the top two items on the EWG Dirty Dozen list. Annually procure organic sources of additional items on the Dirty Dozen list and extended list (2017: currently 51 items) as available and locally when in season.
Develop food purchasing guidebook with specific parameters for various food categories (Completion by May 2018). This tool will be utilized for internal and external purposes to both gauge where we stand as an organization in different food categories, provide prioritization to our needs, and guide external vendors looking to pitch their product to CDS on our desired food parameters.
Annually increase the number of food products that meet Fair Trade as available. (2017: All coffee is fair trade)
Procure certified humane, cage free eggs (This is the first category of the new food purchasing guidebook that has been reviewed and parameters set. Dairy, meat and produce will follow.)


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Yes, the Campus Master Plan Sustainability Section addresses Grunds as follows:
CU-Boulder is facing the challenge of reducing water
usage by 10 percent by 2012. Although both LEED
and STARS address water efficiency, it is important for
CU-Boulder to conserve this valuable resource wherever
possible.
Goals (Based on a 2005 baseline):
• Reduce water usage (gal/ft2) by 10 percent by 2012.
Guidelines:
• The design for the campus landscape will follow the
seven xeriscape principles, enhance biological diversity
using a selection of native and drought tolerant
plantings where practical, and removal of invasive
species.
• Designs should reflect varied micro climates found
on campus.
• Plans will integrate storm water best management
practices to use and purify site water within the
landscape to the extent possible.
• Raw water (also referred to as ditch water) should
be used for all irrigation rather than using treated
potable water from the city.
• Per LEED guidelines, low-flow fixtures shall be used
in all renovated facilities and new facilities.
The university strives to improve water quality of storm
water by reducing pollutant loads to protect existing
streams and creeks, improving drainage, and maintaining
ground water recharge.
Goal:
• To avoid an increase in storm water runoff on campus,
all new designs and renovations should apply
appropriate design techniques and look for new
design opportunities that mimic natural systems to
infiltrate or retain onsite storm water.
Guidelines:
• New building site plans will reduce the storm water
runoff rate and volume by 25 percent of pre-construction
conditions on developed sites and match
existing rates and volumes on undeveloped sites.
• Improve water quality of storm water by using
bio-retention, landscape infiltration, and permeable
paving.
• Consider using green roof technology in appropriate
locations to minimize runoff and reduce heat island
effect.
• Ensure that all construction uses Best Management
Practices (BMPs) by submitting storm water
mitigation plans for approval prior to building permit
issuance.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing and the published plans in which each objective is included:

CU's Sustainable Procurement Guidelines indicate goals and objectives relevant to many purchasing practices as follows:
Sustainable Procurement Guidelines
University departments should consider the following factors and commodity identifiers when planning purchases of goods and services.

Sustainable PurchasingSource Reduction
Procurement activity may include:

Institute practices that reduce waste, resulting in the purchase of fewer products whenever practicable and cost-effective, but without reducing safety or workplace quality.
Purchase remanufactured products such as laser toner cartridges, tires, furniture, equipment and automotive parts whenever practicable, but without reducing safety, quality, or effectiveness.
Consider short-term and long-term costs in comparing product alternatives. Include evaluation of total costs expected during the time a product is owned, including, but not limited to, acquisition, extended warranties, operation, supplies, maintenance, disposal costs, and expected lifetime compared to other alternatives.
Purchase products that are durable, long lasting, reusable, or refillable.
Request that vendors eliminate packaging or use the minimum amount necessary for product protection to the greatest extent practicable.
Request packaging that is reusable, recyclable, or compostable when suitable uses and programs exist.
Reuse pallets and packaging materials.
Require that all equipment purchased, when practicable, be compatible with products and services that provide source reduction benefits.
Recycled Content Products
Procurement activity may include:

Products for which the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has established minimum recycled content standard guidelines - such as printing paper, office paper, janitorial paper, construction, landscaping, transportation, vehicles, and non-paper office products - and which contain the highest post-consumer content practicable, but no less than the minimum recycled content standards established by the U.S. EPA Guidelines.
Copiers and printers that can be used with recycled content products.
Re-refined lubricating and industrial oil for use in vehicles and other equipment, as long as the product is certified by the American Petroleum Institute (API) as appropriate for use in such equipment.
Asphalt concrete, aggregate base, or portland cement concrete for road construction projects that contains recycled, reusable, or reground materials.
Recycled content transportation products including signs, cones, parking stops, delineators, and barricades.
waterEnergy and Water Savings
Procurement activity may include:

Energy-efficient equipment with the most up-to-date energy efficiency functions including, but not limited to, high-efficiency heating and cooling systems.
Efficient lighting with energy-efficient equipment.
Products for which the U.S. EPA Energy Star certification is available and which meet Energy Star certification, when practicable. When Energy Star labels are not available, choose energy-efficient products that are in the upper 25% of energy efficiency as designated by the Federal Energy Management Program.
Water-saving products.
Landscaping
Procurement activity may include:

Employ sustainable landscape management techniques for design, construction and maintenance. These techniques include, but are not limited to, integrated pest management, grasscycling, drip irrigation, composting, and procurement and use of mulch and compost that give preference to those produced from regionally generated plant debris and/or food waste programs.
Minimize waste by selecting plants that are appropriate to the microclimate, species that can grow to their natural size in the space allotted them. Place preference on native and drought tolerant plants that require no or minimal watering once established.
Limit amount of impervious surfaces by procuring permeable substitutes such as permeable asphalt or pavers for walkways, patios, and driveways.
Toxic Products and Pollution
Procurement activity may include:

Refrain from procuring cleaning or disinfecting products (i.e. for janitorial or automotive use) containing carcinogens, mutagens, or teratogens. Chemicals to be avoided are listed by the U.S. EPA or the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health on the Toxics Release Inventory.
Phase out chlorofluorocarbon-containing refrigerants, solvents and similar products.
Procure readily biodegradable surfactants and detergents that do not contain phosphates.
Maintain buildings and landscapes, manage pest problems through the application of prevention techniques and physical, mechanical and biological controls
Procure products with the lowest amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), highest recycled content, and low or no formaldehyde in materials such as paint, carpeting, adhesives, furniture and casework.
Reduce or eliminate the use of products that contribute to the formation of dioxins and furans, including, but not limited to:
Paper, paper products, and janitorial paper products that are bleached or processed with chlorine or chlorine derivatives; and,
Products that use polyvinyl chloride (PVC), including, but not limited to, office binders, furniture, flooring, and medical supplies.
Procure products and equipment with contain no lead or mercury. For products containing lead or mercury, give consideration to those with lower quantities of these metals and to vendors with established lead and mercury recovery programs.
Consider vehicle procurement alternatives to diesel such as compressed natural gas, biobased fuels, hybrids, electric batteries, and fuel cells, as available.
Forest Conservation
Procurement activity may include:

Procure wood products such as lumber and paper that originate from forests harvested in an environmentally sustainable manner.
Give consideration to wood products that are certified sustainably harvested by a comprehensive, performance-based certification system. The certification system shall include independent third-party audits, with standards equivalent to, or stricter than, those of the Forest Stewardship Council certification.
When practicable, procure locally, sustainably harvested wood.
Who Buys What?
CU Procurement Service Center (PSC)

All general purchasing questions should be directed to the PSC at http://www.cu.edu/psc. The PSC is CU's centralized purchasing office located in Denver. Serving all CU campuses, the organization is responsible for buying goods and non-construction services. PSC contact: Charlie Geanetta.

CU Boulder Facilities Management (Facilities)

Facilities provides a broad range of construction and maintenance services for campus facilities, grounds and infrastructure. Through a delegation of authority from the Office of the State Architect, Facilities is responsible for the procurement of all construction-related services, including professional services (i.e. architects, engineers, industrial hygienists, and general consultants). Facilities contact: Jeff Darling.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The CMP has extensive sustainability-related objectives relevant to transportation summarized here as:

D. Transportation
Transportation and particularly alternative modes of
transportation are critical to the success of future
development of the campus. The Campus Master Plan
adopts the goals listed in the Sustainability Task Force
document, which are to:
• Move toward a higher proportion of transportation
fuels derived from renewable resources.
• Increase the number of passenger miles per vehiclemile
traveled.
• Reverse the growth in the average length of trips
taken.
• Work to reduce the growth in the number of trips
taken while retaining the current modal hierarchy of
pedestrians, bicycles and skateboards, transit, car
share/carpool, and single occupancy vehicles (SOV).
To read the Transpo


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The campus Master Plan and the EC Strategic plan both speak to this issue:

C. Zero-Waste
As the University of Colorado Boulder continues to
achieve progress towards carbon-reduction goals
outlined in the university’s Conceptual Plan for Carbon
Neutrality (CPCN), the campus must place greater
emphasis on waste reduction programs in order to
decrease its impacts on ecosystems and communities.
Under guiding documents supported by the Boulder
City Council, Boulder Board of County Commissioners,
and Governor’s Executive Orders “Greening of the
State Government,” the Boulder community is actively
pursuing zero waste operations, defined as a 90 percent
diversion of municipal solid waste. The City of Boulder
has committed to achieving the goal of 85 percent diversion
by 2017 and the county has committed a goal of
beyond 90 percent levels by 2025.
Goals:
• CU-Boulder should increase its own landfill diversion
rate to at least 90 percent by 2020 as a continuous
improvement benchmark in pursuit of a zero-waste
goal.
• CU-Boulder shall prioritize materials management
activities according to the time-honored maxim—
“reduce, reuse, and recycle”—that seeks first to work
with suppliers to reduce or eliminate incoming supply
chain materials.
Guidelines:
• Design and Integrate infrastructure and systems that
support zero-waste practices.
• Retrofit zero-waste collection systems in existing
facilities and all outdoor containers.
• Site and construct a compost system off campus
in partnership with the city or county, capable of
processing all campus originated pre-and post
consumer organics, and develop on-campus end use
destination where possible and market these materials
in the community.
• In support of zero-waste goals and the university’s
educational mission, examine size, location, and
operational capabilities of the existing facility as a
campus unit or in conjunction with the city or county.
• Acquire or create small, flexible interim storage facilities
to manage construction and demolition waste
campus wide.
• Actively pursue a partnership with the county to manage
construction and demolition (C&D) waste on a
regional level.
• Locate recycling, compost, and trash containers,
both indoor and outdoor, to optimize behavioral
compliance with these programs.
• To facilitate the increased use of reuseable water
containers, more public filtered drinking water
stations should be located in existing high use/visibility
areas, and be specified in new construction/
renovations.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Water?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Water and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The CMP and the EC Strategic plan both speak to water issues, for example:

CU-Boulder is facing the challenge of reducing water
usage by 10 percent by 2012. Although both LEED
and STARS address water efficiency, it is important for
CU-Boulder to conserve this valuable resource wherever
possible.
Goals (Based on a 2005 baseline):
• Reduce water usage (gal/ft2) by 10 percent by 2012.
Guidelines:
• The design for the campus landscape will follow the
seven xeriscape principles, enhance biological diversity
using a selection of native and drought tolerant
plantings where practical, and removal of invasive
species.
• Designs should reflect varied micro climates found
on campus.
• Plans will integrate storm water best management
practices to use and purify site water within the
landscape to the extent possible.
• Raw water (also referred to as ditch water) should
be used for all irrigation rather than using treated
potable water from the city.
• Per LEED guidelines, low-flow fixtures shall be used
in all renovated facilities and new facilities.
The university strives to improve water quality of storm
water by reducing pollutant loads to protect existing
streams and creeks, improving drainage, and maintaining
ground water recharge.
Goal:
• To avoid an increase in storm water runoff on campus,
all new designs and renovations should apply
appropriate design techniques and look for new
design opportunities that mimic natural systems to
infiltrate or retain onsite storm water.
Guidelines:
• New building site plans will reduce the storm water
runoff rate and volume by 25 percent of pre-construction
conditions on developed sites and match
existing rates and volumes on undeveloped sites.
• Improve water quality of storm water by using
bio-retention, landscape infiltration, and permeable
paving.
• Consider using green roof technology in appropriate
locations to minimize runoff and reduce heat island
effect.
• Ensure that all construction uses Best Management
Practices (BMPs) by submitting storm water
mitigation plans for approval prior to building permit
issuance.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The EC plan speaks to this issues in several goals and objectives:

3. Goal: Create a diversity-aware, socially just, culturally competent team.
3.1. Objective: Strengthen the voice for social justice in the Environmental Center
3.1.a. Create a full time “Justice Coordinator” staff position
3.1.b. Identify and coordinate social justice outcomes in EC programs and link/leverage them as appropriate
3.1.c. Perform special recruitment for student staff positions in communities of color-related groups so as to maximize diversity employment in the EC

4. Goal: Include diversity and social justice outcomes in the planning and execution of all Environmental Center programs to enhance fiscal, environmental and social sustainability and support campus diversity.
4.1. Objective: Assess and benchmark existing programs’ effectiveness in terms of promoting diversity and social justice.
4.1.a. Conduct ongoing diversity education and cultural competency training for all members of the Environmental Center staff to raise diversity awareness.

5. Goal: Create and maintain an open, respectful, welcoming, and just climate for learning and working within the E-Center and its programs—and, to the extent practical, in the lives of all with whom the E-Center interacts.
5.1. Objective: Strengthen coordination and linkages between EC social justice efforts and those of other campus groups to the maximum extent possible.
5.2. Objective: Conduct customer service training for all student staff that interact with campus and community
5.3 Objective: Review materials that are appropriate for translation and multi-lingual access.

Goal: Deliver relevant levels of service for a growing international student population on campus
3.1 Objective: Work with CU Admissions, International English Center, and other University programs to assess CU's needs and opportunities for Environmental Center collaboration
3.2 Objective: Develop peer to peer education initiatives through existing Family Housing and Residence Halls sustainability programs geared to international students.

4. Goal: Promote healthy lifestyles for all communities and people
4.1. Objective: Collaborate with WHC Wellness Program; Integrate sustainable behavior and lifestyle into WHC programming and initiatives.
4.2. Objective: Educate the campus community of the connections between environmental justice and wellness for all people.
1.3. Objective: Develop and maintain strong connections with diverse communities
1.3.a. Expand environmentally preferable purchasing practices to include women and minority-owned businesses.
1.3.b. Provide multi-lingual information and materials

Goal: Identify and advocate for triple-bottom line outcomes and benefits for campus sustainability programs.
1.1. Objective: Expand the delivery of social benefits in all E-Center programs as a tool to increase conservation performance, promote systems thinking and enhance social justice
1.1.a. Existing and new programs will be evaluated for the delivery of tangible, direct social benefits to people or populations in need as primary deliverables as practical.
1.1.b. Each existing program will conduct annual analysis of potential new social benefits and develop plans to incorporate those benefits in subsequent operations.
1.1.c. Conduct annual assessment and set benchmarks for integrated social benefits.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The University of Colorado Foundation adheres to a Sudan Divestment Policy.
http://www.cu.edu/regents/policy-13a-university-investments

As part of that policy, a negative screen of the entire investment pool is conducted annually. Securities that could be in violation of the policy are identified and managers are then formally asked in writing to sell positions that violate the terms of the policy. This has been done in writing on more than one occasion over the last three years.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Campus building standards support indoor air quality and daylighting that contributes to productivity and healthy working and learning environments.

Student Affairs strategic plan:
• Focus Area 2: Health, Wellness, and Safety
For the Division to effectively contribute to student success, we must serve as a campus leader in offering programs, services, and facilities that improve and maintain student well-being. Promoting the health, wellness, and safety of students must be a holistic, collaborative approach and include a focus on physical and mental health, interpersonal relationship skills, alcohol and other drug harm reduction, and self-efficacy. We must serve as campus experts and visionary, pro-active advocates for positive health behaviors and risk reduction.

Student Affairs and Environmental Center objectives:
Sustain Organizational Capacity and Wellness
FocI:
We ensure wide and focused recruitment to maximize a diverse pool of applicants for staff positions.
We provide professional development opportunities that advance staff acumen and effectiveness, insure staff recognition of achievements that deliver positive outcomes, provide competitive compensation, and foster a supportive and positive team environment.

Goals:
Goal: Create a diversity-aware, socially just, culturally competent team.
Goal: Create and maintain an open, respectful, welcoming, and just climate for learning and working within the E-Center and its programs—and, to the extent practical, in the lives of all with whom the E-Center interacts.
Goal: Assess capacity for program delivery and personnel bandwith.
Goal: Take care of our people (appropriate space, schedules, work-life balance, recognition)

Fair Food Statement of Values
The University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) seeks to enhance the sustainability experience of our students, faculty, staff and visitors by providing food that is healthy for people and our planet. We encourage social and environmental justice in purchasing through the humane treatment of all living things; safe and fair working conditions and agricultural practices; and stewardship of ecosystems, while operating in an economically sound manner. CU Boulder endeavors to support practices and vendors that actively seek strategies to reduce the overall amount of pesticides and carbon footprint, support Colorado economies, and stand alongside our peer institutions and private organizations in promoting a healthier, more sustainable agricultural system without significant financial impact on the University. CU Boulder encourages its suppliers to support these practices and to share CU Boulder’s values with others in order to have a global effect on sustainability.

Food Safety
Food safety is a top priority in Campus Dining Services and we feel that it’s a responsibility that we share with our customers. In addition to employing and practicing extensive food safety in our day-to-day operations, we also require ServSafe certification for our chefs and managers.

We ask our guests to partner with us in several ways:
Be careful not to cross-contact with food that is already on your plate when using serving utensils—this helps protect people with food allergies and sensitivities.
Keep serving utensil handles out of the food—handles contaminate food, and when that happens we have to remove it from the service area to be composted. This also affects sustainability and waste reduction efforts.
Use provided utensils, deli papers and dispensing systems for all foods. This keeps illnesses from spreading through contact with food.
Always make sure to use the inside of your elbow when you cough or sneeze, and turn away from any displayed food—that helps prevent the spread of germs on surfaces.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas (e.g. arts and culture or technology)?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Establish new partnerships with multi-cultural groups every year.


Does the institution have a formal statement in support of sustainability endorsed by its governing body (e.g. a mission statement that specifically includes sustainability and is endorsed by the Board of Trustees)? :
---

The formal statement in support of sustainability:
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The institution’s definition of sustainability (e.g. as included in a published statement or plan):
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Is the institution an endorser or signatory of the following? :
Yes or No
The Earth Charter ---
The Higher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI) ---
ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter ---
Second Nature’s Carbon Commitment (formerly known as the ACUPCC), Resilience Commitment, and/or integrated Climate Commitment Yes
The Talloires Declaration (TD) Yes
UN Global Compact ---
Other multi-dimensional sustainability commitments (please specify below) ---

A brief description of the institution’s formal sustainability commitments, including the specific initiatives selected above:
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.