Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 70.35
Liaison Mo Lovegreen
Submission Date March 2, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of California, Santa Barbara
EN-1: Student Educators Program

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.54 / 4.00 Katie Maynard
Sustainability Coordinator
Geography & Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students enrolled for credit (headcount):
23,563

Total number of students enrolled for credit that are served (i.e. directly targeted) by a student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program (avoid double-counting to the extent feasible):
20,870

Percentage of students served by a peer-to-peer educator program:
88.57

Name of the student educators program:
Residential Dining Services Environmental Studies Internship: Focus on Food

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (headcount):
6,795

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:

The University's Residential Dining Services offers students majoring in Environmental Studies the opportunity to intern for Dining Services as an Environmental Intern. Interns work to improve Residential Dining’s current sustainable efforts. The student interns accomplish this by researching assigned projects, collecting and inputting data, and providing Dining Services with recommendations on how to improve current sustainable practices. Student interns participate in various outreach projects. These include Sustainability Week, a week-long celebration focusing on sustainable efforts where interns table in the dining commons to educate students about sustainable food initiatives; Seafood Day, a program where interns educate students about the Dining Service's sustainable seafood program and engage with students on the importance of purchasing sustainable fish; and Earth Day, a program where interns educate students about a climate-friendly diet. Dining Commons Interns also engage in outreach activities by tabling once per month during Green Mondays; during these particular days, interns engage with students about the nutritional and environmental benefits of consuming a vegetarian meal. In addition to tabling in the Dining Commons, student interns develop educational brochures and PowerPoint slides for the programs to aid in their outreach efforts. Student interns also assist in tracking dining utilities, such as the amount of water, gas, electric, and food waste that are used by Dining Services. This data is used to help the Dining Services work towards achieving more sustainable practices and to remain Green Business Certified.

The students most affected by the Environmental Interns are those who have an active meal plan on campus and are directly exposed to the opportunities provided by Dining Services. Interns educate other students and provide them with educational tools to make the best possible menu selection. This allows the interns to gain valuable experience in food and sustainability outreach and education.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected:

Currently, there are two student interns (student educators). Interns apply to participate in the program by submitting an application, resume, cover letter, and transcript. Applications are reviewed and desirable students are interviewed for the position.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:

Interns are expected to dedicate a 60 hours per quarter and commit to all three-quarters throughout the academic year. During this time, interns are given the opportunity to work alongside professionals in the field and interact with Dining Services staff on projects. Interns are provided the necessary knowledge and training for projects as they are assigned. Interns meet with Danielle Kemp, the adviser for the program, on a weekly basis, and there are multiple opportunities for one-on-one mentor-ship throughout the year.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination):

By having a staff and faculty adviser for the internship, the university supports the program through staff time.


Name of the student educators program (2nd program):
Health and Wellness Internship Program

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (2nd program):
20,870

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (2nd program):

The Health and Wellness Program strives to encourage sustainability through healthy living and buying locally sourced, organic food. Health and Wellness interns and leaders are responsible for facilitating all workshops, marketing, tabling, events, and field trips. Interns are responsible for infusing UCSB with positive, proactive, evidence-based health and wellness messages and activities. Some past peer-to-peer outreach activities include educating students on Healthy Eating and Living (HEAL). HEAL interns spread awareness of the importance of eating sustainable, locally sourced, organic food. HEAL also runs the What the Fruit (WTF) project, which provides fruit bowls on campus to replace the traditional office candy bowls to allow students to have access to sustainable, healthy foods. The WTF Project is funded in part by the Bragg Health Institute. Health and Wellness interns also educate students on how to practice smart, sustainable shopping at local farmers markets and grocery stores, such as our local food cooperative. The program also works with the Residence Hall Association Leadership to select a Health and Wellness Chair (HAWC) in each residence hall. The HAWC incorporates Health and Wellness programs in residential life with by providing residents with information, programming, and resources.

Each quarter, Health and Wellness interns and student leaders track the number of students that attend each event put on by the Health and Wellness program. These numbers are then totaled to approximate the number of students served by the program. All Health and Wellness programs are open to all students on campus, but the interns primarily target the undergraduate population and send staff representatives to address any requests from the graduate student population. For this reason, we are not including graduate students in the number of students served above.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (2nd program):

There are currently 20 student interns and 6 student leaders in the Health and Wellness program. Interns and leaders are selected through an application process, in addition to completing basic training, attending workshops, and completing certification in a Health Skills topic. Topics include healthy eating and living, sex and relationships, alcohol and other drugs, and well-being. In addition to interns and student leaders, the Health and Wellness program also has 9 Health and Wellness Chairs who represent the program in undergraduate residence halls. These representatives are chosen through an application process and receive training through Health and Wellness and the Residence Hall Association. There are also 9 volunteers who regularly help with events and distribute fruit through the WTF program.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (2nd program):

Student leaders in the Health and Wellness program receive 50 hours of training, in addition to the intern training they need in order to apply to be leaders. Interns receive approximately 20 hours of training divided into three main categories: 8 hours health skills, 8 hours life skills, 4 hours intern skills.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (2nd program):

The Health and Wellness program is paid with a mix of state funds through Student Affairs, small gifts, and student lock in fees. The University also supports the program by providing office space and staff.


Name of the student educators program (3rd program):
Environmental Awareness Chair

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (3rd program):
5,695

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (3rd program):

The Environmental Awareness Chairs (EACs) are elected by their respective Residence Hall to serve as an executive member of the Hall Council for the entirety of the school year. After they are elected, they receive training from the Environmental Awareness Chair Coordinator (EACC) and their advisors so as to best serve their halls and fulfill their obligations. As EACs, they are charged with striving to educate their peers on environmental issues, positively influencing the residents' habits (for example, encouraging them to recycle, have a more sustainable diet, reducing shower times and energy usage, etc.), increasing awareness towards global and local issues regarding the environment, and hosting environmentally-themed events to engage students throughout the year.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (3rd program):

The Environmental Awareness Chair of each of the 9 Residence Halls is selected by their peers via an online ballot. The candidates for the position must attend an info session concerning their duties as EAC and as an executive member of Hall Council. Then, they are required to submit a description of their expertise and experience in environmentalism and sustainability so that the voters may take this into consideration. Lastly, the voting commences, and whoever receives the most votes wins the position of EAC for their particular Residence Hall.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (3rd program):

After the EACs are appointed by their peers, they must attend the Leadership Forum. The forum is one day long, during which they learn about the Residential Housing Association (RHA), about their positions, and about the EACC. They also attend workshops on environmental and sustainable practices. Examples of subjects they learn about include: the RHA Green Bill and how to enforce it, how to effectively use RHA's Compostable Materials Bank, guidelines and tips to keep their events environmentally-friendly, and how to do outreach and engage students in matters of sustainability. Throughout the year, the EACs also have regular meetings and one-on-one encounters with the EACC and their Assistant Resident Director to increase their knowledge and expertise concerning their position and obligation. In addition to this, they are encouraged to attend workshops, lectures, seminars, and events hosted by other on-campus organizations related to the environment and their position as EAC.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (3rd program):

The EACs receive support in the form of advisors (which are the Assistant Resident Directors of their Residence Halls and the EACC), as well as financial support from the Residence Halls Association.


A brief description of all other student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education programs, including the number of students served and how student educators are selected, trained, and supported by the institution:
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Total number of hours student educators are engaged in peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education activities annually (all programs):
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.