Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 70.10
Liaison Francis Mitalo
Submission Date March 5, 2021

STARS v2.2

University of California, Riverside
PA-7: Support for Underrepresented Groups

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Fortino Morales
Sustainability Officer
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a publicly posted non-discrimination statement? :
Yes

The non-discrimination statement, including the website URL where the policy is publicly accessible:
It is the policy of the University of California Riverside not to engage in discrimination against or harassment of any person employed or seeking employment with the University of California on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender, gender expression, gender identity, pregnancy, physical or mental disability, medical condition, genetic information, ancestry, marital status, age, sexual orientation, citizenship, or service in the uniformed services. Furthermore, University policy prohibits retaliation against any member of the University community filing a complaint of discrimination or harassment. This policy is intended to be consistent with the provisions of applicable State and Federal laws and University policies.



https://diversity.ucr.edu/policies-and-guidelines

Does the institution have a discrimination response protocol or committee (sometimes called a bias response team)?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s discrimination response protocol or team:
The Chief Compliance unit includes the Title IX, Equal Opportunity & Affirmative Action Office (Title IX/EO) and the Whistleblower Office. These offices work as a team to help make sure that UCR is a safe, equitable place for students, faculty and staff to live, learn and work, and that unethical conduct is addressed.

Title IX/EO promotes equal opportunity and non-discrimination, and responds to reports of discrimination, harassment (including sexual violence) and discriminatory retaliation. Anyone may file a complaint with Title IX/EO, which will review the report and determine the appropriate response, typically in consultation with the person allegedly discriminated against or harassed. Complaint resolution options include alternative resolution or formal fact-finding investigations. To learn more, visit the Title IX/EOAA website:

https://compliance.ucr.edu/office-title-ix-equal-opportunity-affirmative-action.

The Whistleblower Office oversees the UC whistleblower policies. These policies can be used to address a variety of complaints, particularly complaints of illegal or improper activities by UCR employees (rather than students). Complaints are carefully reviewed and appropriate action taken, which may involve a formal fact-finding investigation.

https://compliance.ucr.edu/investigations-complaint-resolution



UCR’s Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation Complaint and Resolution policy defines Prohibited Conduct (see Section III) and provides a process through which members of the UCR community, including students, employees, persons seeking employment, paid and unpaid interns, volunteers, participants in a training program leading to employment, and independent contractors, may report alleged discrimination, harassment, retaliation, and other conduct that violates the applicable non-discrimination laws or University policies, including:

· UC Policy on Discrimination, Harassment, and Affirmative Action in the Workplace

· PACAOS 20.00, Policy on Nondiscrimination

· The relevant provisions of APM-15: The Faculty Code of Conduct.

Procedure for Reporting Prohibited Conduct

Certain university employees are Responsible Employees who are required to report Prohibited Conduct. (See Section VIII) Campus community members who have experienced discrimination, harassment, or retaliation are encouraged to report the Prohibited Conduct to Title IX/EOAA. Reports under this policy should be brought as soon as possible, optimally within a year, after the alleged conduct occurs. Prompt reporting will enable the University to investigate the facts, determine the issues, and provide an appropriate remedy or corrective action. Delays in reporting may impede the University’s ability to conduct an investigation and/or effect appropriate actions. Reports may be made anonymously; however, anonymous reporting may limit the University’s ability to respond to the report.

Reports may be made:

· Through the University’s hotline, which allows anonymous reports, at http://universityofcalifornia.edu/hotline or 1-800-403-4744



· Online at https://secure.ethicspoint.com/domain/media/en/gui/23531/index.html. This link leads you to the UC Whistleblower Hotline, EthicsPoint, where you can submit various kinds of complaints including discrimination, harassment and retaliation. Please click on the button, “Report a Concern Online” on the Whistleblower Hotline webpage.

· By contacting the Office of Title IX/EOAA by email (titleix@ucr.edu).

Reports do not need to be in writing. Title IX/EOAA staff may request that reporters complete an online report or provide additional information if the report does not provide sufficient information.

Complaints of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation filed through the Whistleblower Hotline [all employees], through a PPSM70 complaint [staff], or through APM 140 [non-senate, non-represented academics] may be directed to Title IX/EOAA.

Individuals reporting Prohibited Conduct generally will be:4

· provided a copy of these procedures, which set forth options for resolution as well as information on confidentiality, privacy, and record retention.

· informed about options for resolving potential violations of University policy, which may include Early Resolution, Formal Investigation, and filing grievances under applicable grievance procedures in accordance with collective bargaining agreements.

· informed about the range of possible outcomes should it be determined a violation has occurred.



Procedure for Responding to Reports of Prohibited Conduct

After receiving a report of Prohibited Conduct, the Title IX/EOAA Office will conduct a fair, complete, and timely initial review of the report to determine whether the report, on its face, alleges an act of Prohibited Conduct and if such conduct warrants University intervention. Title IX/EOAA may consult with other appropriate resources. An initial review of an incident or other potential Prohibited Conduct may also be initiated by Title IX/EOAA.


Reports of Prohibited Conduct may be addressed through Early Resolution, Formal Investigation, and/or a separate complaint resolution process or grievance process in accordance with applicable University policy or collective bargaining agreement.

Early Resolution

The goal of Early Resolution is to resolve concerns at the earliest reasonable opportunity and with the cooperation of all parties involved. Title IX/EOAA will utilize Early Resolution when the initial review indicates that the situation may be effectively resolved cooperatively, when a complaint involves less serious violations, and/or when a Formal Investigation is not likely to lead to resolution. Early Resolution may include an inquiry into the facts, but typically does not include a Formal Investigation. Means for Early Resolution are flexible and encompass a full range of possible approaches such as discussions with the parties, making recommendations for resolutions, separating the parties, negotiating an agreement for disciplinary action, conducting targeted educational and training programs, and using follow-up measures to assure that resolutions have been implemented effectively.


Early Resolution is not required prior to a decision to initiate a Formal Investigation. Some reports are not appropriate for Early Resolution and may require a Formal Investigation at the discretion of Title IX/EOAA.


A complainant may request a Formal Investigation at any time during an Early Resolution process, but Title IX/EOAA has final authority for determining whether to initiate a Formal Investigation.


Formal Investigation

In cases where Early Resolution is inappropriate or unsuccessful, Title IX/EOAA may recommend the case for Formal Investigation. In the decision to initiate a Formal Investigation of a report of prohibited conduct, the wishes of the complainant will be considered, but are not determinative. Title IX/EOAA, in consultation with other appropriate offices or entities, may recommend a case for Formal Investigation after making a preliminary inquiry into the facts and taking into consideration, among other things, the seriousness of the alleged harassment or discrimination and other complaints of similar conduct or against the same individual. Conversely, if Title IX/EOAA concludes that the facts as alleged by the complainant and/or as found by a preliminary inquiry demonstrate that the alleged conduct does not meet the standards for discrimination, harassment, or retaliation under University policy, the complainant’s request to initiate a Formal Investigation may be declined.


In the event of a Formal Investigation, an investigator will be assigned. The parties will be notified of the allegations being investigated, and provided admonitions regarding retaliation, investigation interference, and confidentiality.5 The investigator will conduct the investigation by interviewing the parties, including other witnesses, and reviewing and evaluating other available evidence.

Upon completion of the investigation, the investigator will issue a written report of findings to Title IX/EOAA. Based on the written investigation report, the Title IX/EOAA Director will make a determination as to whether the evidence supports a finding that university policy has been violated. Investigation reports and Director determinations are not subject to appeal or revision to party objections. If a report forms the basis of disciplinary action, the disciplinary process typically provides opportunity for the employee to respond or object.6


Title IX/EOAA will inform the complainant and the respondent promptly in writing as to whether there was a finding of violation of the University Nondiscrimination Policies. The complainant will be informed of any systemic remedies taken to resolve the complaint and of any actions taken that are directly related to the complainant, such as an order that the respondent not contact the complainant. In accordance with University policies protecting individuals’ privacy, the complainant may generally be notified that the matter has been referred for corrective action, but will not be informed of the details of the recommended corrective action.


The complainant and the respondent may request a copy of the investigative report pursuant to University policy governing privacy and access to personal information. The report will be redacted to protect the privacy of personal and confidential information regarding all individuals other than the individual requesting the report in accordance with University policy.

Remedies and/or Referral for Corrective Action

If the Formal Investigation finds Prohibited Conduct occurred, Title IX/EOAA or other appropriate office, in consultation with relevant administrators, and the University, shall take prompt and effective steps reasonably calculated to stop the violation, prevent its recurrence, and, as appropriate, remedy its effects.


Title IX/EOAA will forward the investigative report (with attachments and any necessary redactions) to the relevant administrator(s). The specific procedures for determining corrective action depend upon the nature of the respondent’s relationship to the university (e.g., faculty, other academic appointee, staff, or third party). When a respondent is both a student and an employee (such as a Teaching Assistant or Graduate Student Researcher), the respondent may be subject to both the sanctions applicable to students and to employees. Individuals found to have engaged in Prohibited Conduct may be subject to corrective action, up to and including dismissal, in accordance with the applicable University procedures or collective bargaining agreement.

Confidential Resources

Confidential resources are available for individuals who wish to have a confidential discussion about an issue involving discrimination, harassment, or retaliation without an official response from the University. These offices provide a safe place to discuss concerns and learn about the procedures and potential outcomes while remaining anonymous. Discussion with these confidential offices are not considered reports under this policy and will not result in any actions by the University to resolve the concerns. The following are confidential resources:

· Office of the Ombuds - for any individual of the UCR community in need of support

· Faculty & Staff Assistance Program - for faculty and staff in need of support

· Campus Advocacy Resources & Education (CARE) - for students, staff, and faculty in need of support related to Sexual & Relationship Violence or Sexual Harassment

· Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) - for students in need of support.



https://fboapps.ucr.edu/policies/index.php?path=viewPolicies.php&policy=650-75

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit students from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit academic staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs designed specifically to recruit non-academic staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to recruit students, academic staff, and/or non-academic staff from underrepresented groups:
Students

At UC Riverside, we find strength in our diversity. We’re a minority-majority campus with dedicated programs, resources, and community partnerships that ensure all students can succeed. In fact, UCR has been nationally recognized for its work toward closing the graduation gap, and holds the distinction of being both a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) and an Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution (AANAPISI).



That work begins even before students apply to UCR and continues beyond graduation. The Community Engagement and Outreach (CEO) team in Undergraduate Admissions partners with groups on and off campus to attract applicants from historically underserved and underrepresented backgrounds. Once those students are enrolled, CEO partners provide them with academic, financial, and social/emotional support.



CEO team members attend college fairs and counselor summits; present at middle schools, high schools, and community colleges; and host outreach events with community-based, faith-based, and student-led organizations. They also do special presentations for school and community groups. CEO facilitates Umoja at UCR , an organization that supports currently enrolled and prospective transfer students.



More information found at: https://admissions.ucr.edu/community-engagement-outreach



Staff

Staff Hiring Process designed to encourage equity: UCR is committed to open and competitive recruitment for all staff positions. (Chart provided in website outlining staff hiring process, staff recruitment guidelines, recruitment checklist) Waivers are infrequent and require approval by both the Director of Affirmative Action and the Chief Human Resources Officer to assess the impact on diversity. All job listings include a complete job description containing both required and preferred qualifications against which applicants are assessed.

UCR averages 650 staff recruitments annually and utilizes carefully constructed recruitment plans that map out the strategy for attracting a broad and diverse pool of applicants, which includes women and underrepresented groups including veterans and individuals with disabilities.

Staff hiring training for hiring committees: In order to minimize the potential for personal bias, search committees are required for all staff recruitments. All members of the search committee must have demonstrated an understanding of UC’s commitment to diversity by completing at least one from a list of six training courses on the topic (under “training”).

Talent Acquisition and Diversity Outreach department: In 2014, HR created a department of Talent Acquisition and Diversity Outreach to improve the quality and diversity of applicant pools and reduce time to fill vacant staff positions. The search for a Director focused on candidates with a strong track record of recruiting diverse applicants. All members of the department are responsible for regular participation in community agency groups and events supporting underrepresented minorities. All Talent Acquisition staff have completed extensive training in diversity and inclusion, most recently completing a six-part program on avoiding implicit bias. Staff primary activities are focused on outreach and sourcing to develop strong pools of diverse, well-qualified applicants.

Community Partnerships for staff hiring: Talent Acquisition staff partner with local agencies and community-based organizations that serve underrepresented minorities, veterans, and individuals with disabilities to expand the diversity of applicant pools. Partnership activities include sponsoring meetings and networking events, and conducting job preparation workshops for the organization’s job seekers. Talent Acquisition also participates in community job fairs to expand the diversity of applicant pools. Recent efforts have been particularly focused on outreach to veterans and individuals with disabilities.

Social Media in staff job advertising: UCR HR has used social media to attract qualified diverse talent pools and further brand UCR as a diverse and inclusive employer. Approximately 66% of staff recruitments plans include expanded outreach to specialized job boards as well as social media strategies.

More information found at: https://diversity.ucr.edu/history-ucr-diversity-efforts



Faculty

President’s and Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellowship: The University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program was established in 1984 to encourage outstanding women and minority Ph.D. recipients to pursue academic careers at the University of California. The current program offers postdoctoral research fellowships, professional development and faculty mentoring to outstanding scholars in all fields whose research, teaching, and service will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity at the University of California.

The UC Riverside Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellowship Program for Academic Diversity offers postdoctoral research fellowships and faculty mentoring to qualified scholars in all fields whose background, life experiences, research, future teaching, or service will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity at the University of California. These contributions may include acting as role models, contributions to university or public service, addressing the needs of our increasingly diverse society, efforts to advance equitable access to higher education for women and minorities, or research focusing on underserved populations or understanding issues of inequalities related to race, gender, disability and sexual orientation. The program seeks applicants with the potential to bring to their academic careers the critical perspective that comes from their non-traditional educational background or understanding of the experiences of members of groups historically underrepresented in higher education.

https://diversity.ucr.edu/history-ucr-diversity-efforts#presidents_and_chancellors_postdoctoral_fellowship



Equal Employment & Affirmative Action (EEAA) Review in Faculty and Staff Hiring Process: For all faculty hiring, EEAA must review and approve all search plans prior to the start of a search. EEAA also reviews and approves the short list of applicants to be interviewed, and reviews and approves the final search report to ensure the search met compliance regulations before the department may conduct any additional searches.

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Advisory Committee: The Office of Diversity and Inclusion has convened the Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Advisory Committee with representatives from all colleges and faculty, staff, and students, to plan the future of D&I efforts on campus. The group is currently helping to pilot the Equity Advisors program for faculty and the LEADS program to help staff MEI graduates continue to contribute to D&I efforts on campus more formally.

Equity Advisors Pilot: In spring 2018, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion conducted a survey to determine how best to implement an Equity Advisors program in three pilot schools. Initial funding for the program will come from the Provost and the Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Workgroup is currently developing a selection process for the program. Equity advisors will be in place in four pilot schools for Fall 2018

Cluster Hiring: A major part of the stated purpose of cluster hiring was to help diversify the faculty and clusters were chosen in part based on the diversity of their availability pools.

Faculty Search Committee Training: Campus leadership recognized upcoming the hiring initiatives as a prime opportunity to work to diversify the faculty. The Offices of Academic Personnel and Diversity and Inclusion collaborated to provide training required for all committee chairs on conducting equitable searches that promote diversity and inclusion.

Faculty Search Committee Training updates: Held an interactive workshop with past search committee chairs to identify best practices for conducting equitable searches. Revised curriculum for faculty search committee training. Required both committee chairs and AACLs to attend.

Provost Diversity in Engineering Fellowship: Through The Provost’s Diversity in Engineering Fellows program, successful candidates in BCOE received a tenure-track faculty position and funding for up to a year of a research fellowship prior to joining the faculty at UCR. The appointment letters for both the research fellowship and faculty position were signed at the same time, but because the faculty position did not start until after the research fellowship, there was no impact on the tenure clock. In addition, the PDEF program supported professional development and research, covering travel to conferences and resources that enabled the candidate to use research facilities at UCR or elsewhere. Candidates also received training resources including guidance in teaching skills, research ethics, grant writing, and time management. Through the program, BCOE successfully hired three candidates who enhanced the school’s diversity.



Making Excellence Inclusive Graduate Student program: This is a ten-week training program for graduate students modeled on the staff MEI program that helps graduate students contribute to and navigate the academy in ways that are equitable and inclusive. As of 17-18, the program was extended to two quarters.





More information found at: https://diversity.ucr.edu/history-ucr-diversity-efforts

https://academicpersonnel.ucr.edu/recruitment-and-appointment#additional_resources





UCR has some departmental programs that are aimed towards underrepresented groups. For example, CAMP-UCR is a program that works to encourage NSF-declared underrepresented students in the STEM fields to successfully complete undergraduate science degrees and further pursue their studies at the graduate and professional levels. Additionally, the UCR School of Medicine is committed to recruiting students, faculty and staff responsive to our mission whose diversity contributes to an optimal learning environment.

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs designed specifically to support students from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs designed specifically to support academic staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support non-academic staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs designed specifically to support students, academic staff, and/or non-academic staff from underrepresented groups:
Students

The Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion provides resources for students: African Student Programs, Asian Pacific Student Programs, CARE (Campus Advocacy, Resources & Education), Chicano Student Programs, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Graduate Division, International Student Resource Center, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) Resource Center, Middle Eastern Resource Center, Native American Students Programs, Undocument Student Programs, Student Disability Resource Center, The Well, Women’s Resource Center, and Veteran Resource Center.

https://diversity.ucr.edu/student-resources



The Well: The Well provides education, trainings, resources, and programming for students in a variety of health and wellness topic areas, through a network of peer educators, mentors, and professional staff. The Well's health education programs, events, and campaigns aim to inform about health topics important to UCR students, and to provide opportunities to practice healthy behaviors to encourage the development of lifelong wellness habits. The Well's peer programs raise awareness and educate UCR students about a variety of health topics, provide opportunities for leadership and professional development, and foster connections between students on campus. The Well promotes healthy minds, bodies, and communities through student-centered health education, access to resources, peer engagement, and collaboration, and strives to contribute to a safe, supportive, and connected campus environment.

https://well.ucr.edu/

Women’s Resource Center (WRC) provides programs and services that support and empower the UCR community. We offer campus safety programs, sexual assault and domestic violence support, student leadership opportunities, and special events connected to women's and gender issues. We champion student persistence, gender equity, a strong sense of community, and everyone's right to safety and a high quality of life. The WRC is a multipurpose Student Affairs department that promotes awareness and proactive response connected to issues that intersect women and gender.

Faculty

The Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion provides resources for faculty, which includes Professional Organizations, Women’s Organizations, and UCR Women’s Faculty Association.

Professional organizations include: American Association of Blacks in Higher Education, American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education, American Indian Higher Education Consortium, Asian Pacific Americans in Higher Education, Association on Higher Education and Disability, Higher Education Recruitment Consortium, National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity, National Center for Instituional Diversity, National Consortium of LGBT Directors/Resources in Higher Education, and National Indian Education Association

https://diversity.ucr.edu/faculty-resources

https://diversity.ucr.edu/professional-organizations



Staff

The Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion provides resources for staff, which includes Career Development, Education & Organizational Development, Faculty & Staff Assistance Program, and Current Staff Openings.

https://diversity.ucr.edu/staff-resources

Does the institution have training and development programs, teaching fellowships and/or other programs that specifically aim to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members:
The Office of Diversity provides guidance on Affirmative Action hires and mentoring to faculty, staff, and students on diversity. UCR offers postdoctoral fellowships in Cultivating Diversity in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics.

UCR received an NSF grant to initiate "FORWARD" (Faculty Organization for Women's Advancement, Recognition, and Development) in support of increasing diversity in STEM fields.

UCR is also a member of Partnership for Adaptation, Implementation and Dissemination (PAID) Together the five UC campuses in southern California have formed a Partnership for Faculty Equity and Diversity. This Partnership builds on and augments the experience of the NSF/UCI ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Program for gender equity now in its sixth year. It represents an impressive level of cooperation among the nation’s leading public research universities for a common challenge: the recruitment and advancement of women and under-represented minority faculty at UC campuses.

For student support in preparing future faculty diversity, UCR provides a number of programs to mentor and support students from underrepresented groups to succeed in all areas, with an emphasis on STEM fields. The programs include:

President’s and Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellowship: The University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program was established in 1984 to encourage outstanding women and minority Ph.D. recipients to pursue academic careers at the University of California. The current program offers postdoctoral research fellowships, professional development and faculty mentoring to outstanding scholars in all fields whose research, teaching, and service will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity at the University of California.

The UC Riverside Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellowship Program for Academic Diversity offers postdoctoral research fellowships and faculty mentoring to qualified scholars in all fields whose background, life experiences, research, future teaching, or service will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity at the University of California. These contributions may include acting as role models, contributions to university or public service, addressing the needs of our increasingly diverse society, efforts to advance equitable access to higher education for women and minorities, or research focusing on underserved populations or understanding issues of inequalities related to race, gender, disability and sexual orientation. The program seeks applicants with the potential to bring to their academic careers the critical perspective that comes from their non-traditional educational background or understanding of the experiences of members of groups historically underrepresented in higher education.

https://diversity.ucr.edu/history-ucr-diversity-efforts#presidents_and_chancellors_postdoctoral_fellowship



California Alliance for Minority Participation (CAMP): https://stem.ucr.edu/research-opportunities/camp

The California Alliance for Minority Participation is designed for students in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics [STEM] fields pursuing graduate (Master/Doctoral) degrees.

To increase the quantity and quality of underrepresented students receiving Baccalaureate, Master and Doctoral degrees in STEM.

To support sustained and comprehensive approaches that facilitate achievement of the long-term goal of increasing the number of students who earn doctorates in STEM.

Foster undergraduate research as a stepping stone toward higher education

Develop written and oral communication skills



GAANN Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (U.S. Department of Education): https://news.ucr.edu/articles/2018/12/10/uc-riverside-receives-45-million-engineering-graduate-education

TriO Programs (Upward Bound Classic and Upward Bound Oasis): https://trioprecollege.ucr.edu/

California Teach-Science & Mathematics Initiative: https://smi.ucr.edu/

Mentoring Summer Research Internship Program (MSRIP): https://graduate.ucr.edu/mentoring-summer-research-internship-program-msrip

Does the institution produce a publicly accessible inventory of gender-neutral bathrooms on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution offer housing options to accommodate the special needs of transgender and transitioning students?:
Yes

Website URL where information about the institution’s support for underrepresented groups is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

Data source(s) and notes about the submission:
Credit prepared by Michelle Baron and revised by Chelsea Lee.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.