Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 68.66
Liaison Eric Boles
Submission Date March 5, 2021
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Arkansas
PA-3: Participatory Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.75 / 3.00 Eric Boles
Director
Office for Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Do the institution’s students have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a student council)? :
Yes

Do the institution’s students have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which students are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

The University of Arkansas’ Associated Student Government was founded in 1921. Since then, the Associated Student Government has worked hard to be an organized voice for the undergraduate students at the University of Arkansas. Specifically, ASG supports a number of campus programs and initiatives while allocating approximately $250,000 to Registered Student Organizations each year. The Associated Student Government is split into three branches: Executive, Legislative, and Judicial. The three branches work together to strive for the betterment of the organization and the University of Arkansas as a whole. ASG representatives are elected by their student peers.

The Graduate Professional Student Congress (GPSC) advocates for the collective welfare of graduate and professional students at the University of Arkansas. The GPSC manages and distributes student activity fees paid by graduate and professional students, represents the common interests of these students, and speaks with one voice on behalf of its constituents. The GPSC seeks to improve the lives, careers, and research of all graduate-professional students at the University of Arkansas. GPSC leadership is elected by the graduate and professional student bodies.

The elected ASG and GPSC presidents meet monthly, if not more regularly, one-on-one with the Chancellor and attends Executive Committee meetings, which is the highest governing body at the UA-Fayetteville. They also meet regularly with other administrators, such as the Provost and Dean of Students.

The Constitution of the State of Arkansas prevents elected students from serving on the Board of Trustees. Appointments are made by the governor for multi-year terms. Furthermore, the system includes 20 universities, two-year schools, or units, many of which have their own elected student, faculty, and staff governance, so equitable representation by elected individuals would (under the current Constitution of the State of Arkansas) be impossible.

The University of Arkansas adheres to a "shared governance" model.


Do the institution’s staff members have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a staff council)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s non-supervisory staff members have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which staff are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

The Staff Senate and its elected senators represent the UA staff to the campus leadership. Their job is to advocate for staff in the areas of compensation, benefits, safety, parking and other workplace issues. Representatives are elected by their peers.

The Chair (highest office) of Staff Senate also meets regularly with administrators, including upper administration.

The University of Arkansas adheres to a "shared governance" model.


Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a faculty senate)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body? :
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which teaching and research faculty are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

The Faculty Senate is the representative body of the University of Arkansas faculty and holds authority as given in the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees Policy 810.1.

The Faculty Senate exercises the general legislative powers of the faculty and has sole jurisdiction over admission requirements; transfer of credits; withdrawls; academic honesty; scholastic probation, suspension and dismissal; curriculum and courses; degrees and degree requirements; awarding of academic honors; and recommendations to the board of trustees for honorary degrees.

The faculty may also make recommendations on any institutional matter of faculty concern such as: policies regarding faculty status, including appointments, promotions, granting of tenure, retirement, nonreappointment, and dismissal; policies affecting the general welfare, working conditions, and the services performed by and for the faculty; and policies relating to academic and professional research and other scholarly and creative activities.

The Faculty Senate is comprised of six executive officers, including a chair, vice chair, secretary, parliamentarian, a chair-elect and a vice chair-elect, as well as 45 voting senators, 32 of whom represent the colleges and schools, and 13 of whom are elected at large. Senators serve two-year terms. More than a dozen non-voting members also sit on the Faculty Senate by virtue of the administrative positions they hold on campus.

The Chair (highest office) of Faculty Senate also meets regularly with administrators, including upper administration.

The University of Arkansas adheres to a "shared governance" model.


Does the institution have written policies and procedures to identify and engage external stakeholders (i.e. local residents) in land use planning, capital investment projects, and other institutional decisions that affect the community?:
Yes

A copy of the written policies and procedures:
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The policies and procedures:

The University of Arkansas has many different procedures. Regarding Land use, the University specifically addresses Reaffirming our Land-grant and Flagship Responsibilities. The goal is to clearly articulate the university’s role as a land-grant and flagship institution to its varied constituencies and strengthen university outreach efforts across the state and beyond.

There is also a Town and Gown Committee which has representatives from the UA, City of Fayetteville, and community at large. The elected presidents of ASG and GPSC serve on this committee as well.

The Town and Gown Advisory Committee was created by Ordinance 5511 on July 3, 2012. On February 5, 2013 Ordinance 5564 was passed to amend the structure of the City and University appointments. On October 3, 2017 Ordinance 6001 was passed to amend the scope of the committee’s duties; to redefine the membership; and reduce the number of required meetings. Ordinance 6178 passed on April 16, 2019 to amend the composition to add the President of the University of Arkansas Graduate Professional Student Congress as a member. Ordinance 6196 passed on July 2, 2019 amending the ordinance to expand opportunities for Fayetteville Residents to serve on city boards, commissions and committees.

The Committee shall be a forum for collaboration between the City of Fayetteville and the University of Arkansas on mutually relevant issues including, but not limited to, capital projects; transportation and traffic; infrastructure planning; neighborhoods; cultural and community engagement; safety; fire; and security. The committee is empowered only to advise and make recommendations on a periodic basis to both the City Council and the University of Arkansas on such issues, and to adopt rules for the conduct of its own business.

Additionally, the Office for Governmental Relations coordinates University of Arkansas activities related to government and community organizations on a local, state, and federal level. The Office of Governmental Relations regularly works with the Chambers of Commerce, Arkansas State Government (including the legislature), and the Federal Government (including Congress.)


Does the institution have formal participatory or shared governance bodies through which community members representing the interests of the following stakeholder groups can regularly participate in institutional governance?:
Yes or No
Local government and/or educational organizations Yes
Private sector organizations No
Civil society (e.g. NGOs, NPOs) No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which external stakeholders are engaged in institutional governance (including information about each stakeholder group selected above):

The City of Fayetteville and the University of Arkansas work closely together and include representatives from respective sides on many of their internal committees. The city and university collaborate on many issues and abide by each others' policies and initiatives when appropriate.

The Chambers of Commerce, state government, and federal government work closely with the Office for Governmental Relations on relevant issues, and the office serves as an additional point of connection between campus and the larger community.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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