Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 66.35
Liaison Trevor Ledbetter
Submission Date May 2, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Arizona
PA-3: Participatory Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 3.00 Benjamin Champion
Director
Office of Sustainability
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Do the institution’s students have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a student council)? :
Yes

Do the institution’s students have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which students are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

Students may run for a seat in the Associated Students of the University of Arizona and they may also participate on committees and boards such as the Student Services Fee Board or the UA Green Fund.


Do the institution’s staff members have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a staff council)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s non-supervisory staff members have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which staff are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

Classified and Appointed Professionals may participate in their respective employee type committees. The individuals that serve on these committees represent the employee type in higher level administrative bodies.


Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a faculty senate)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body? :
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which teaching and research faculty are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

Through the Faculty Senate, UA faculty have the opportunity to sit on a variety of committees that work to create a good environment for faculty as well as provide faculty consultation on campus wide initiatives, mission, interactions, and more.


Does the institution have written policies and procedures to identify and engage external stakeholders (i.e. local residents) in land use planning, capital investment projects, and other institutional decisions that affect the community?:
Yes

A copy of the written policies and procedures:
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The policies and procedures:

University of Arizona has multiple community engagement committees of community neighbors in review of campus land use strategies, UA police enforcement efforts of student behavior, and more. These efforts are led by an Assistant Vice President of Community Relations.


Does the institution have formal participatory or shared governance bodies through which community members representing the interests of the following stakeholder groups can regularly participate in institutional governance?:
Yes or No
Local government and/or educational organizations No
Private sector organizations Yes
Civil society (e.g. NGOs, NPOs) Yes

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which external stakeholders are engaged in institutional governance (including information about each stakeholder group selected above):

Private Sector:
Yes, the different colleges and departments have different ways of engaging with the private sector, but all have mechanisms for doing so. In addition, there are some cross-university platforms for engaging, including the UA Employer Summit, which happens annually and is put on by Career Services. This is a summit in which employers are invited to campus to discuss student readiness, employment needs, partnership with UA, etc. They engage with students, faculty, and administration leaders.

Civil Society:
UA has several ways that the non-profit sector organizations engage in a formal way. One way is the Community Councils. There are seven councils on which the leading non-profits are represented. The councils have their own agenda for their work, but they focus on supporting the UA’s mission, and on advocating to the UA for the populations they serve. They have a scheduled meeting with the UA President every semester to set priorities, agree on work plans, advise on diversity issues, etc. The councils are: African American, Asian Pacific American, Disability, Hispanic, LGBTQ, Native American, and the University Religious Council.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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