Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 82.53
Liaison Pierre Lemay
Submission Date Dec. 23, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Universite Laval
OP-9: Landscape Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.35 / 2.00 Pierre Lemay
Development Advisor
Office of the Vice Rector, External and International Affairs and Health
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Total campus area (i.e. the total amount of land within the institutional boundary):
444.79 Acres

Figures required to calculate the total area of managed grounds:
Area (double-counting is not allowed)
Area managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program that uses a four-tiered approach 177.56 Acres
Area managed in accordance with an organic land care standard or sustainable landscape management program that has eliminated the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides in favor of ecologically preferable materials 96.44 Acres
Area managed using conventional landscape management practices (which may include some IPM principles or techniques) 0 Acres
Total area of managed grounds 274 Acres

A brief description of any land excluded from the area of managed grounds (e.g. the footprint of buildings and impervious surfaces, experimental agricultural land, areas that are not regularly managed or maintained):

Footprint of buildings and impervious surfaces (parking lots) were excluded from the area of managed grounds.


Percentage of grounds managed in accordance with an IPM program:
64.80

A copy of the IPM plan or program:
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A brief description of the IPM program:

Pest management in and around buildings is contracted out to Orkin Canada (orkincanada.ca), a qualified company that adheres to the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

Pest management on the grounds is also carried out in accordance with IPM principles. Establishment of appropriate action thresholds, monitoring, and control are the cornerstones of the university’s pest management approach, whether it be for the campus’s 800 American elms, the Van den Hende Botanical Garden, or the green spaces on campus.


Percentage of grounds managed in accordance with an organic program:
35.20

A brief description of the organic land standard or landscape management program that has eliminated the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides in favor of ecologically preferable materials:

No chemical fertilizers or pesticides, rotenone, mothballs, or treated or painted wood are allowed in the organic community garden. Anyone in violation is banned. No treatment products are used in wooded areas. http://www.jcbul.ca/regraveglements.html


A brief description of the institution's approach to plant stewardship:

Université Laval takes special care of the native plants in its woods, which cover 17% of campus. For example, trails divert walkers around native plants, which include red trilliums, erythroniums, a variety of fern species, shadbushes, Canadian yews, choke cherries, and more.

Many of the native trees in our woods are mature. Species include sugar maple, red maple, white ash, red oak, American elm (some over 100 years old), cedar, and pine.

Our landscaping also features climate-resistant native plants.


A brief description of the institution's approach to hydrology and water use:
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A brief description of the institution's approach to materials management and waste minimization (e.g. composting and/or mulching on-site waste):

Cut grass is not bagged. Raked leaves are composted in-situ. Tree branches are chipped and used as in-situ mulch.


A brief description of the institution's approach to energy-efficient landscape design:
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A brief description of other sustainable landscape management practices employed by the institution (e.g. use of environmentally preferable landscaping materials, initiatives to reduce the impacts of ice and snow removal, wildfire prevention):

The University employs a range of snow removal strategies to reduce the impact on the environment while addressing the challenges of Québec City’s northern climate.

Snow is removed mechanically. De-icing and abrasive mixtures are prepared and applied as needed (amounts and proportions) based on the local weather forecast. A different mixture of sand and calcium chloride (less corrosive than sodium chloride) is used on parking lots, streets, and sidewalks and near buildings. Because our winters are so bitterly cold (often with temperatures below 20° Celsius), certain de-icers cannot be used because they are ineffective at these temperatures. When we get freezing rain, 1/8″ gravel is spread with a shovel onto sidewalks and near buildings to minimize the amount used while at the same time ensuring pedestrian safety.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.