Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 82.53
Liaison Pierre Lemay
Submission Date Dec. 23, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Universite Laval
OP-10: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 Pierre Lemay
Development Advisor
Executive Vice-rectorate
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of the legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance:

Since 1964, the Montmorency Forest has served as an open-air lab where UL students and researchers learn and innovate in an environment in line with real-life forestry operating conditions. Recognize by multiples forestry agencys has a model forest, the forest is sustainably managed and constitutes Université Laval’s main carbon sink. In September 2014, the Montmorency Forest was expanded from 66 km2 to 412 km2. This expansion enables Université Laval to demonstrate the economic viability of sustainable forest management from an integrated resource management perspective as well as encourage testing of management models and foster innovations in teaching.

795 ha are legally protected as a provincial government biodiversity reserve and 103 ha are designated by University protocol has high conservation values forests. A total of 898 ha (13,5%) of the total area are now protected for biodiversity conservation.


Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify endangered and vulnerable species (including migratory species) with habitats on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify environmentally sensitive areas on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

The methodologies used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or environmentally sensitive areas (including most recent year assessed) and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:

ENDANGERED AND VULNERABLE SPECIES
The endangered species list was drawn up in 2012 in accordance with statuses determined by the provincial and federal governments, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCM). The list is reviewed annually based on new statutes and field observations from research or teaching work in the territory.

The list of species potentially found in the territory was drawn up in 2014 using lists from recognized bodies and organizations (COSEWIC, IUCN – Red list, Species at Risk Act (SARA), Act Respecting Threatened or Vulnerable Species) as well as distribution maps for these species. Nature Serve’s geomatic data bank, MFFP maps, and occurrences recorded at Centre de données du patrimoine naturel du Québec (CDPNQ) were used for this purpose.

Next, the list was validated in comparison with the list in the report on the biodiversity challenges of ecosystem management in the Laurentian Wildlife Reserve (Comité scientifique sur les enjeux de biodiversité, 2010). The list of endangered wildlife species in Montmorency Forest is validated as and when new knowledge on species emerges through teaching and research activities and use of field reconnaissance tools.

It should be noted that no endangered plant species have been recorded in Montmorency Forest (CDPNQ, May 10, 2011). However, MDDELCC believes that the following endangered plant species may be present: western maidenhair fern, northern holly fern, male fern, and calypso orchid. These species are monitored using a plant and wildlife observation form.

ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
An analysis of local deficiencies based on representativeness criteria on the scale of local landscapes and ecosystems within the territory was carried out for the first time in 2000 and repeated in 2014.

The fundamental criterion used to determine representativeness on the scale of landscapes was ecological landscape units, which are composed of zones with similar topography, delineated by the major geological features of the area. The fundamental criterion used to determine representativeness on the scale of ecosystems was the Montmorency Forest potential management units, which are composed of zones with similar characteristics in terms of deposit, drainage, and slope. In addition to representativeness, the presence of virgin forest, connectivity, spatial characteristics, and the ecosystem retention percentage were all decisive factors in choosing the sectors to protect.

Two other methods have also been used: identification of high conservation value forests using the FSC method and completion of a preindustrial forest portrait to identify ecosystems that have grown scarcer due to logging and better protect remaining species or restore those whose numbers are dwindling (Leblanc et al., 2002).


A brief description of identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

ENDANGERED AND VULNERABLE SPECIES
In Montmorency Forest, the university’s teaching and research forest, the following threatened or vulnerable species have been observed: woodland caribou, southern bog lemming, rock vole, brown bat, northern long-eared bat, Barrow’s goldeneye, Bicknell’s thrush, golden eagle, bald eagle, common nighthawk, chimney swift, olive-sided flycatcher, rusty blackbird, Canada warbler, short-eared owl, and barn swallow.

ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
For better connectivity between reserves and proper protection for the aquatic environments of the Montmorency and Noire Rivers, 795 ha (12% of the territory) are legally protected as a provincial government biodiversity reserve.

The proposed Montmorency Forest Biodiversity Reserve is divided into six sectors: the La Chute sector, the Laflamme Lake sector, a sector near the entrance to Montmorency Forest, the Bellefeuille Hill sector, the Joncas Bog sector, and the Les Cascades sector. The six proposed areas in the biodiversity reserve are connected by a 140 ha riparian and aquatic zone made up of the Noire and Montmorency Rivers and their riparian environment.


A brief description of plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

ENDANGERED AND VULNERABLE SPECIES
The sustainable development policy for Montmorency Forest includes guidelines for endangered species. Forestry practices can be adapted to maintain a high-quality habitat for two wildlife species: woodland caribou and Bicknell’s thrush. Objectives and targets for both species are set out in the integrated tactical forest management plan

For other wildlife not covered by specific management plans, the Forest conducts field monitoring to document their presence. The results are recorded on a field form.
http://www.foretmontmorency.ca/fr/amenagement-durable/

ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Montmorency Forest has an integrated tactical forest management plan whose objectives include protecting the proposed biodiversity reserve. (http://www.pulaval.com/produit/apercu/plan-d-amenagement-forestier-integre-tactique-2014-2019)


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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