Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 69.71
Liaison Sharmilla Raj
Submission Date May 6, 2024

STARS v2.2

Toronto Metropolitan University
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.50 / 3.00
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines, or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across multiple commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
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The policies, guidelines or directives:

Section 2d of TMU's Purchasing Policy incorporates the following guiding principle to support sustainable purchasing: Buying with Impact - The University shall leverage its purchasing power to create social, sustainable, and economic value in diverse communities by seeking out and utilizing diverse suppliers across the University. The full policy can be found here: https://www.torontomu.ca/policies/policy-list/purchasing-policy/ TMU released the following statement regarding its most recent social procurement initiative in 2020: “Every purchase the university makes carries an economic, environmental and social impact. So when we make purchases with social procurement as a consideration, we are intentionally placing social value alongside economic value in our decision-making process.” This initiative is part of an ongoing partnership between Financial Services and the Office of the Vice-President, Equity and Community Inclusion (OVPECI) to develop a Social Procurement Program and corresponding policies for TMU. TMU has published Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines, as well as a Social Purchasing Policy which incorporates sustainability in 2023. This also includes a Playbook. The Social Purchasing Policy expands on ‘Buying with Impact’ which involves the promotion of Social Procurement by enabling individuals and organizations to create social value by turning their purchases into powerful instruments to create social, sustainable, and economic value for the broader community. A commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) and Indigenous values and experience is a core value of the University. The University maintains a visible presence for equity, diversity and inclusion and Indigenous values and experience as integral components across administrative functions of the University, while addressing the range of systemic barriers. The purpose of this policy is to outline the commitment of and framework under which the University will ‘buy with impact’, to leverage its purchasing power to further its commitments to equity, diversity and inclusion and Indigenous values and experience by broadening the opportunities to Diverse Suppliers into the University’s supply chain. The full Social Purchasing Policy can be found here https://www.torontomu.ca/policies/policy-list/social-purchasing-policy/ TMU's Sustainability Purchasing Guidelines are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure purchases are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. TMU's Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines were developed collaboratively by the Sustainability Office and Financial Services. They are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure they are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. By purchasing from manufacturers and suppliers who share our commitment to sustainability and leveraging the buying power of TMU we can incentivize others to work towards our standards. It's important to note that these guidelines should be read in conjunction with the Purchasing Policy, Social Procurement Policy, and Sustainable Building Guidelines More information on the Sustainability Purchasing Guidelines can be found here https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainable-purchasing/ Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC) As a member of CAMSC, TMU has access to a range of products and services from Indigenous and racialized-owned businesses that operate in Canada. These suppliers are vetted by CAMSC certification, which includes the criteria that the business is at least 51% owned, managed and controlled by an Indigenous Person(s) or racialized person(s). Not only will this enable the university to diversify the supply chain within which TMU conducts business, but also allow us to support the CAMSC’s efforts to increase engagement, inclusion and utilization of products and services from its diverse network. This new partnership means that TMU employees, faculties and departments making purchasing decisions now have access to over 450 certified suppliers in the CAMSC network. Purchasing Services will proactively prioritize suppliers from the CAMSC network on behalf of TMU. Our purchasing analysts will be reviewing our vendor spending across the university to identify opportunities to engage vendors from CAMSC. Selecting suppliers from the CAMSC network means we can make purchases with the confidence that our choice invests in the advancement of Indigenous and racialized communities. https://camsc.ca/


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA less comprehensively, e.g. for certain types of systems or projects and not others

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

TMU's Sustainable Building Guidelines ensure our commitment to carbon reduction and environmental sustainability is reflected in the design and creation of our spaces. The guidelines apply to all capital projects (new construction, additions and major renovations), minor renovations with carbon and energy implications (as applicable) and should be included in all request for proposals. The guidelines include a section on LCCA, which is as follows: In new constructions and major renovations, Life Cycle Costing (LCC) should be performed to quantify the impacts on GHG, energy costs, maintenance costs, etc. For new construction, the period should typically be 30 years. For major renovations the period should typically be 20 years. The energy modeling results may be used to conduct Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) and parametric analyses. It may be justified to calculate the LCCA for a longer period, especially in new construction projects, in conjunction with the durability analysis. For each project the consultant should comment on the choice of the period of time used in the calculation. Models of up to three design options for the energy, GHG, and water systems, including but not limited to HVAC systems, heat recovery systems, dedicated outside air systems, outside air reduction schemes, fenestration, envelope systems, and on-site energy sources may be requested as defined by TMU sustainability team, as specified in the RFP on a case by case basis. Because of the uncertainty of energy prices and the lifetime of typical components, life cycle cost analysis for energy purposes will typically be done over 20 to 30 years. TMU’s sustainability team shall define the discount rates and the acceptable Rate of Interest/Return on Investment (ROI) and lifetimes to be used should be reviewed by the Sustainability team prior to calculating the LCC. In addition, the following language is included in our RFPs and Scope of Work for capital and deferred maintenance projects with potential energy impacts: Life Cycle Cost Analysis Requirements: Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) should be performed to quantify the 20 year impacts on GHG, energy costs, maintenance costs, etc. The results of the energy modeling may be used to perform Life Cycle Cost Analyses and/or Parametric analyses. Models of up to (3) three design options for the upgrades. Because of uncertainty of energy prices and the lifetime of typical components, life cycle cost analysis for energy purposes will typically be done over a 20-year period. The Ryerson Project Team shall define the discount rates and the acceptable Rate of Interest/Return on Investment (ROI) and lifetimes to be used for any LCCA analyses required.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:

TMU's Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure purchases are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. It includes a section on chemical products that is as follows: Request options that are third-party certified such as Green Guard, Green Seal, and Safer Choice. Look for statements that the product has eliminated toxic or harmful materials or ingredients (chloroform, chlorine, formaldehyde, etc.). Sources such as EWG’s Guide to Healthy Cleaning can help inform these decisions. https://www.ewg.org/guides/cleaners/content/cleaners_and_health/ Look for statements that the product or service produces low/no volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or other pollutive emissions. Learn more about VOCs in cleaning products. https://www.safehouseholdcleaning.com/voc-cleaning-products/?__cf_chl_jschl_tk__=07e3bce79045280719ed94cd990ff51ff281e08a-1614955120-0-AVBQapZmUoosTsXep2F6tiYNNXCWTaCb_QgrgrKjLIvanLDIf4ejO_QPJrypQHZXwIDya_JynrFgP2bEvqls9-QepyQHdYNeGu0zCL0hU285tCIo-oWvuBmJgzoJJBoFggsPvyOi4bTjCPBu1yyLi506R3AW2aPE7rfj-YZqHJRYK7k7Pcsm1Ovt8kq4grrkRvZu7aOaC1HZJAdcDr9nZX3Kd6_U_EBEpRmZ9SyVbwFod3Nj6bGfNcHYLNFWN3d16gIlMGyHp2cxgBGacqU92oguD6gvzoLJLaqvL9m65YyVrSd3u11GHnoJhhN510GUKQh6oLaJW3gFNrNqcUH1t_L8NOMwZEKv9qwGdon3fuNm Consider if the product and/or packaging can be disposed of through existing campus recycling programs? Look for these labels: Green Seal is reviewed by third parties to meet guidelines of two standards of the International Organization for Standardization. Green Seal certifies products that meet rigorous life cycle-based sustainability standards. Green Guard is a third-party certifying body that aims to protect human health and improve quality of life by enhancing air quality. https://www.ul.com/services/ul-greenguard-certification Safer Choice is a certification and labeling program by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that shows consumers which products perform well and are safe for human health and the environment. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice For more information on TMU's sustainability purchasing guidelines: https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainable-purchasing/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating consumable office products?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for consumable office products:

TMU's Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure purchases are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. It includes a section on office supplies that is as follows: Office Supplies: Paper and Paper Products Explore paperless options for items and processes that traditionally have relied on print materials. Look for products that integrate post-consumer recycled paper. A box of paper with recycled content is likely cheaper than purchasing virgin-material paper. Request options that are third-party certified as environmentally friendly or eco-conscious e.g. Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). Plan ahead and buy in bulk to reduce the number of orders made. Look for these labels: Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) is a solutions-oriented sustainability organization that collaborates on forest-based conservation and community initiatives that demonstrate and enhance our shared quality of life. https://forests.org/ The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) ensures a chain of custody on certified products that source paper from either recycled or responsibly managed forests. FSC is an independent, non-profit organization that protects forests for future generations. https://fsc.org/en Green Seal is a non-profit environmental standard that uses a life-cycle approach to assess environmental impact, providing certification for a variety of products and services including paper and cleaning products. https://greenseal.org/splash/ Sustainable Green Printing Partnership (SGP) uses a multi-attribute certification process that was created by the printing industry specifically for the printing industry that considers the entire print facility, its process, product, and social areas. https://sgppartnership.org/ For more information on TMU's sustainability purchasing guidelines: https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainable-purchasing/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating furniture and furnishings?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for furniture and furnishings:

TMU's Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure purchases are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. It includes a section on furniture and furnishings that is as follows: Furniture and Furnishings Before purchasing new furniture, check the TMU Furniture Rehome Program (https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/reuse-repurposing/furniture-rehome-program/) as a first step to ensure that there are no pre-existing products or surplus resources that we already have that can fill your need. Request products that have third-party eco-conscious and/or circular product-design certification such as Cradle to Cradle, Green Label Plus, and LEVEL certified. (See the table of labels below.) Furniture without FSC labels are often made from non-certified tropical hardwoods, or woods that are not sustainably-harvested sources. Reduce packaging weight and volume to improve transportation related energy consumption. Prioritize locally manufactured and Canadian-made furniture. Consider the recyclability and recyclable products and biodegradable products to support a sustainable end-of-life cycle. Choose supplies that can recycle/dispose of products responsibly at the end of their life, through trake-back, deconstruction, and donation programs. Do not dispose of furniture. Contact Sustainability Office to determine options for reuse, donation, or recyclability. Look for these labels Cradle to Cradle recognizes products that are made of safe materials that can be disassembled and recycled. https://c2ccertified.org/ Launched by BIFMA, the LEVEL certification program provides transparency on furniture products that are environmentally and socially responsible, including their manufacturing facilities and parent company, with three performance tiers. https://www.bifma.org/page/level The Carpet and Rug Institute label indicates flexible polyurethane foam made without harmful chemicals and used in the production of bedding, upholstered furniture, and mattresses. https://carpet-rug.org/ UL Green Guard certification is for low chemical emission products and indicates minimal to no volatile organic compounds (VOC) are emitted from certified products used to build and furnish indoor environments. https://www.ul.com/services/ul-greenguard-certification The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) ensures a chain of custody on certified products that source paper from either recycled or responsibly managed forests. FSC is an independent, non-profit organization that protects forests for future generations. https://fsc.org/en For more information on TMU's sustainability purchasing guidelines: https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainable-purchasing/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) and equipment?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for Information Technology (IT) and equipment:

TMU's Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure purchases are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. It includes a section on Information Technology (IT) and equipment that is as follows: Information Technology (IT) Products and Services Computers, Cellphones and Other Electronics: Request options that are third-party eco-friendly certified such as EPEAT, ENERGY STAR, and TCO Certified. Consider the durability of the product, its components, and whether the product and/or packaging has reusable/replaceable parts. Look for non-toxic or water-based inks, correction fluids and glues. Select electronics (computers, monitors, printers and copiers), that have a take-back program for reuse or recycling through an eStewards-certified facility deemed appropriate by the CCS department. Analyze the operational costs and energy efficiency of the product over its lifespan. This guide from the Principles of Digital Development can help estimate total lifetime costs of enterprise software solutions. https://digitalprinciples.org/resource/howto-calculate-total-cost-enterprise-software/ Consider energy or resource-saving settings available with electronics, such as “sleep mode”. This can be easily found in product descriptions or reviews. Contact the Sustainability Office to identify suitable redistribution options for unwanted, functional electronics, such as the Furniture Rehome Program, TMU Free Store, and/or charity donations. https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/reuse-repurposing/furniture-rehome-program/ https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/reuse-repurposing/free-store/ Use these tools Natural Resources Canada has developed their “Energy Star Simple Savings Summary Tool (XLS)”. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rI-Y3XCj5TKrArMnWLuxDMtWUar1wvns/edit?usp=share_link&ouid=100747012497979490124&rtpof=true&sd=true This is an excellent, Microsoft Excel-based tool for determining the overall cost and energy efficiency of a particular make/model you may be interested in for anything from office equipment and electronics to appliances, heating and cooling systems. Natural Resources Canada has a wealth of information and various calculators. https://natural-resources.canada.ca/home Look for these labels ENERGY STAR is a greenhouse gas reduction program that helps consumers identify energy efficient products. Energy Star identifies energy efficient electrical products. Energy consumption standard. https://www.energystar.gov/ Ecolabel for Technology products. EPEAT is a system to help purchasers evaluate, compare, and select electronic products based on their environmental attributes. EPEAT is an environmental rating system that identifies greener computers and electronic equipment. https://www.epeat.net/ TCO Certified is the world-leading sustainability certification for IT products. https://tcocertified.com/ For more information on TMU's sustainability purchasing guidelines: https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainable-purchasing/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food service providers:

TMU's Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure purchases are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. It includes a section on food that is as follows: Food: Support food security in the region by purchasing food and beverages that are local, seasonal, culturally appropriate and/or sustainably / fair trade certified. Prioritize products that are sustainably and/or ethically produced as determined by one or more recognized food and beverage sustainability standards. Donate excess food from events to homeless shelters in the city. Compost food and organic waste through the waste receptacles available on campus. Look for these labels While somewhat similar to Fairtrade, Rainforest Alliance is more focused on protecting biodiversity and fighting deforestation. https://www.rainforest-alliance.org/ SPP Global (formerly FUNDEPPO) is an intercontinental network of small, ecological, fair-trade and organic producers from Latin America, Africa, and Asia; Fair Trade accepted. SPP only certifies organic products https://spp.coop/the-spp/what-is-spp-global/?lang=en For more information on TMU's sustainability purchasing guidelines: https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainable-purchasing/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:

TMU's Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure purchases are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. It includes a section on garments and linens, as well as swag, that is as follows: Textiles, Garments and Linens: Seek suppliers and their business partners who respect fundamental individual and employee rights and are committed to adopting responsible practices. Source textiles, clothing, and other goods from manufacturers participating in Fair Labor Association supply-chain initiatives, fair-trade certified or another third-party anti-sweatshop monitoring. https://www.fairlabor.org/ Verify the cleaning requirements of any textile products or garments to avoid the use of harsh chemicals and/or if there are alternative cleaning solutions available. Donate surplus garments and linens to TMU’s Free Store. If garments and linens are damaged and unwearable, contact the Fashion Department or the Sustainability Office for initiatives that reuse or recycle fabric, as well as the proper method of disposal. Look for these labels The Global Organic Textile Standard is the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from certified organically produced raw materials. It includes strict environmental and social criteria for all processors, manufacturers, and traders in the textiles supply chain. https://global-standard.org/ Swag: Swag can be inexpensive on a per-unit basis, but the products typically aren’t worth much to the people who receive them. They are quickly lost, broken, or discarded. More original, durable, or useful giveaways will have more value and do much more for the TMU brand and/or departmental reputation. Reconsider the need for disposable or short-term use or low-value promotional gift items — look for alternatives to fulfill this need e.g. digital gift, an experience or gift card instead. Check current inventory/surplus and consider if you’ve used current products to the end of their useful life. Right-size your order to reduce surplus. During university rebranding, the Branded Materials Transition Project helped to manage over 4,815 kgs of undistributed swag — the equivalent of 240,750 keychains or 963,000 PopSockets. For more information on TMU's sustainability purchasing guidelines: https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainable-purchasing/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional service providers:

TMU's Sustainable Purchasing Guidelines are designed to reduce the environmental impact of purchasing decisions and ensure purchases are aligned with university-wide sustainability goals for responsible resource management and social sustainability. It includes a section on garments and linens, as well as swag, that is as follows: Professional Services: Preparing to Buy Look for suppliers that are transparent in their business practices and have sustainability integrated into their values. Refer to the Checklist of Questions for Suppliers in appendix A. Prioritize purchasing from a to“Diverse Supplier” means a Supplier that is either certified by a Supplier Certification Organization, or self identified to be more than 51% (majority) owned, managed and controlled by persons belonging to an Equity-deserving Community or Indigenous Peoples. Refer to TMU’s Social Purchasing Policy. https://www.torontomu.ca/policies/policy-list/social-purchasing-policy/ Tip: Sustainability Supplier Questionnaire is a helpful tool in choosing suitable suppliers (Appendix A) Look for these labels Certified B Corporations are leaders in the global movement for an inclusive, equitable, and regenerative economy. Unlike other certifications for businesses, B Lab is unique in its ability to measure a company’s entire social and environmental impact. https://www.bcorporation.net/en-us/ Certified Lists from the following Supplier Councils Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC) Canadian Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (CGLCC) Certified Women in Business Enterprises (WBE Canada) Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business Inclusive Workplace Supply Council of Canada Buy Social Canada For more information on TMU's sustainability purchasing guidelines: https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainable-purchasing/


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:

TMU has a published Sustainability Handbook which acts as a guide to incorporating sustainability habits and behaviours into people's daily life and/or work. It includes a section on transportation which is as follows: Encourage alternative modes of transportation to get to and from campus such as walking, biking and taking public transportation into your weekly commute Develop an internal carpooling program to encourage colleagues to come to campus together, reducing environmental impact while building team dynamic (you can also share the Smart Commute City of Toronto carpool matching website). https://www.smartcommute.ca/public/home.aspx#/ Notify colleagues of the bike share program on campus or bring your own bike - get a 10 percent discount for a full year Toronto Bike Share if they have a Presto card https://bikesharetoronto.com/presto/ Make yourself aware of the closest bike parking to your building. https://www.torontomu.ca/maps/ Take advantage of the bike repair station in front of the Student Campus Centre on Gould Street. Encourage virtual meetings over business travel. When business travel is necessary, encourage more environmentally-friendly options like the train. In Residence or at Home: Collaborate when driving by finding out who lives in your area and arranging a carpool. Drive efficiently by accelerating smoothly and avoiding fast acceleration/braking which consumes most of your car’s energy. Also curb idling by turning off your engine after 10 seconds of stand-still. For more information on the Sustainability Handbook, please refer to https://www.torontomu.ca/facilities-management-development/sustainability/sustainability-resources/sustainability-handbook/#!accordion-1554479265090-transportation-


Website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable procurement program or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Data source(s) and notes about the submission:
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