Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 71.58
Liaison James Gordon
Submission Date March 3, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Thompson Rivers University
OP-11: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 James Gordon
Environmental Programs and Research Coordinator
TRU Office of Environment and Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of any legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance on institution owned or managed land:

The fact that a large portion of the protected TRU natural area lands that are almost directly attached to a major nature park (Kenna Cartright Park) frequented by many types of wildlife (deer, marmots, badgers, owls and other birds, to name some), means that TRU lands are an important wildlife corridor. (At 1977 acres, Kenna Cartright Park, is the largest municipal park in the province, and is only seperated from TRU lands by one road). In conjunction with this, TRU natural area lands are frequented by two species at risk: the Lewis's Woodpecker and the American Badger. Both of these have been monitored on campus by TRU faculty and students.
A grassland restoration project during the summer and fall of 2014 took place to remediate sensitive native grasslands that were severely disturbed. A faculty-student team undertook the project and so far has successfully remediated the land using native plants to repopulate the area. The area will be monitored for plant succession over many years, and a nearby permanent kiosk with educational posters will explain to visitors the nature of the project and the importance of the grasslands.
TRU also owns and operates the Wells Gray Education and Research Centre, located adjacent to the 550,000 hectare Wells Gray Provincial Park, located north of Clearwater, B.C.. The Centre, within close proximity of the park and other crown land officially designated for educational and research purposes, consists of research buildings within a 5 hectare area, as well as a close-by diverse and sensitive ecosystem made up of 65 hectares of land. Wells Gray Park and vicinity are an ecologist's and naturalist's paradise, with a geological past which includes volcanoes and glaciers as well as a recent history of fires and windstorms. All of these factors have created a mosaic of habitats supporting diverse ecological communities.


Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify endangered and vulnerable species with habitats on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify environmentally sensitive areas on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

The methodology(-ies) used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or environmentally sensitive areas and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:

Several faculty in the Faculty of Science have monitored the two species at risk on the campus over many years: Lewis’s Woodpecker, and American Badger. The badgers in particular received much attention in 2014 when a mother and three kits were found in a den in the heart of the campus: http://inside.tru.ca/2014/07/17/badgers-on-campus-gain-some-attention/.
The methodology used with the grassland restoration project consisted of ensuring no future disturbance of the protected lands would take place; forming a faculty-student team and securing funding for the restoration project; growing new native plants in greenhouses; planting these plants with faculty, students and community volunteers; erecting the educational kiosk (projected to be complete in Spring 2015); and laying out the framework with the faculty and students to continue monitoring the project.


A brief description of identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

Lewis’s Woodpecker, American Badger.
For a description of environmentally sensitive areas, please see the description in the very first text box above.


A brief description of plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

Several faculty in the Faculty of Science have monitored the two species at risk on the campus over many years (Lewis’s Woodpecker, American Badger).
Regarding a brief description of plans in place to protect or positively affect identified habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas, the following is taken from the 2013 TRU Master Plan document (page 40). "Outdoor Research and Teaching Space - Learning is a process that occurs indoors as much as it does outdoors. At TRU, the diversity of native grasses, plant life and wildlife is recognized by various faculties and community groups to benefit research as an outdoor lab. This land use is designated to protect and preserve the existing natural areas for learning and teaching, as well as, recreational purposes. It is similar to, but differentiates itself from, the open space network by the nature of pre-existing native plant life unique to the region. TRU’s academics consist of a strong horticulture tradition and the study of plant species crosses many of the academic programs currently offered by TRU. These range from the Horticulture to the Culinary Arts program. The current outdoor teaching lab for the Natural Resource Sciences program will be protected from development in the master plan. Undevelopable areas containing challenging topography or environmentally sensitive zones have also been designated under this land use."


The website URL where information about the institution’s biodiversity policies and programs(s) is available:

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