Overall Rating Bronze
Overall Score 38.83
Liaison James Vollrath
Submission Date Dec. 16, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Texas State University, San Marcos
OP-10: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 James Vollrath
Director
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of the legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance:

Campus surrounds waterways with endangered species.


Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify endangered and vulnerable species (including migratory species) with habitats on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify environmentally sensitive areas on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

The methodologies used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or environmentally sensitive areas (including most recent year assessed) and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:

The upper San Marcos River is one of the most biologically diverse aquatic ecosystems known in the southwestern United States and has a number of endemic species that are isolated to the upper 4.5 miles of the river. Consequently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Department, and Texas Parks and Wildlife have designated the San Marcos Springs and Spring Lake critical habitat. Critical habitat refers to a particular geographical area that contains all of the physical, chemical, and biological attributes needed for the continued success of an endangered plant or animal and that may require special efforts for their management and protection.


A brief description of identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

Identified species are Comal Springs Dryopid Beetle, Peck's Cave Amphipod, San Marcos Gambusia, Comal Springs Riffle Beetle, Fountain Darter, San Marcos Salamander, Texas Blind Salamander, and Texas wild-rice.


A brief description of plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

The Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) is intended to provide assurance that suitable habitat for covered species will remain in both the San Marcos and Comal Springs, despite lawful water use activities within the Edwards Aquifer region.

Through a stakeholder driven process, the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program recommended that the Edwards Aquifer Authority, the City of San Antonio–represented by the San Antonio Water System, the City of San Marcos, the City of New Braunfels, and Texas State University apply for an Incidental Take Permit (ITP) under the Endangered Species Act.

All projects outlined in the HCP are designed to provide overall benefit to the springs systems and the species that inhabit those springs through the three major project categories:

Habitat protection measures
Flow protection measures
Supporting measures

The ITP was granted by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in order to allow the permittees a specified level of disturbance in the system in the understanding that a variety of mitigation measures will be implemented.

http://eaahcp.org/


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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