Overall Rating Platinum - expired
Overall Score 85.74
Liaison Moira Hafer
Submission Date June 28, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Stanford University
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Moira Hafer
Sustainability Specialist
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
---

The policies, guidelines or directives:

Consistent with Stanford's sustainability goals, the purpose of its sustainable purchasing policy is to support and facilitate the purchase of products and materials that minimize the harmful effects to the environment from their production, transportation, use and disposition. It is Stanford's preference to purchase and use environmentally preferable products whenever they perform satisfactorily and can be acquired at similar total value (cost/quality). A related purpose is to develop and implement common purchasing programs to be used by all Stanford personnel that support suppliers of environmentally preferable products, services and practices.

For the complete policy language, please visit the following:
http://www.stanford.edu/group/fms/fingate/staff/buypaying/policy_notes/sustainable_purchase.html
http://sustainable.stanford.edu/sites/sem.stanford.edu/files/documents/Stanford_sustainable_procurement_guidelines.pdf

Additionally, Stanford has a stated preference for contracting with minority and women-owned businesses. See https://adminguide.stanford.edu/chapter-5/subchapter-5/policy-5-5-1


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA as a matter of policy and standard practice when evaluating all energy- and water-using products, systems and building components

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

To improve the cost-effectiveness of its building and renovation programs, Stanford recognizes that it must invest in designs and systems with improved long-term performance. The Guidelines for Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) instruct Project Teams to consider not only the "first costs" of a building but also long-term costs, including utilities, operations, and maintenance. The guidelines are uploaded as an attachment for this credit.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services (e.g. building and facilities maintenance, cleaning and sanitizing, landscaping and grounds maintenance)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:

Green cleaning products are specifically included in both Stanford's sustainable purchasing policy and sustainable purchasing guidelines. Specifically, Stanford recommends Green Seal products as Environmentally Preferable Products, and the guidelines provide guidance on finding Green Seal products online. The vast majority of Stanford’s building space does in fact utilize Green Seal or other green cleaning products, as required through Stanford's contracts with custodial providers and groundskeepers.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating construction and renovation products (e.g. furnishings and building materials)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for construction and renovation products:

Stanford's Department of Land, Buildings and Real Estate has developed a thorough Project Delivery Process (PDP) that addresses sustainability in planning, budgeting, design and construction, including Life Cycle Cost Analysis. The guidelines for Life Cycle Cost Analysis are attached as additional documentation to this credit.

Additionally, Stanford’s sustainable procurement guidelines specifically call for the use of asphalt and concrete containing re-crushed cement concrete aggregate, glass cullet or recycled fiber, plastic or tire rubber.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) products and services (e.g. computers, imaging equipment, mobile phones, data centers and cloud services)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for IT products and services:

For computer purchases, 100% of recommended computers are rated EPEAT Gold or EPEAT Silver. Procurement includes Energy Star requirements in all RFPs for electronic products. Stanford has worked with IT vendors to get these at an excellent price, which motivates students, faculty and staff to make the environmentally sound choice.

For more details, please visit:
https://itservices.stanford.edu/service/help/hardwarerec/computers


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food services (i.e. franchises, vending services, concessions, convenience stores)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food services:

All of Stanford’s recent café contracts require that the vendor maintain landfill, recycling, and compost collection infrastructure consistent with the campus Zero Waste program. For any cafes where this language is not included, Stanford plans to add the language in upon renewal of the contract.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:

Stanford’s Procurement and EH&S departments worked together to compile requirements for lab coat cleaning, including sustainability concepts. The vendor selected was Cintas, which operates a vast sustainability program. More information on the Cintas lab coat cleaning program is available here: http://www.cintas.com/customer_applications/green/.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional services (e.g. architectural, engineering, public relations, financial)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional services:

Stanford’s sustainable procurement guidelines state that departments must evaluate the environmental performance of vendors contracted for the provision of products and services.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels (e.g. travel, vehicles, delivery services, long haul transport, generator fuels, steam plants)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:

Stanford’s Sustainable Purchasing Policy calls for minimization of deliveries to campus and distance a product has to travel to get to campus. It proposes strategies such as purchasing locally or from suppliers that the department already uses to avoid the addition of new delivery routes by new suppliers. This policy is supported by a campaign run by the Procurement department called “Green Tuesdays,” where purchasers are encouraged to only schedule deliveries on Tuesdays of each week, minimizing the need for delivery routes to occur every day. In 2015, as a result of the Green Tuesdays campaign, the number of trips to campus was reduced by about 10 trips per weekday.

Stanford has also contracted with an electric bus vendor to electrify the Marguerite bus fleet, which now has 23 fully electric buses. The university fleet is also on the path towards electrification. The campus Fleet Manager is in the midst of compiling a strategic plan to move the campus fleet towards fully electric or non-motorized modes of transportation on all possible vehicles over the next several years.

Stanford’s Procurement department has also begun a systematic process of evaluating sustainability in each vendor category, and one of the first four categories addressed was travel. By evaluating travel vendors and employee travel purchase patterns, Procurement hopes to develop policies and best practices for sustainable travel for Stanford employees.

Finally, Stanford’s sustainable procurement guidelines specifically call for the use of remanufactured tires and products made from recycled tire rubber, as well as re-refined lubrication and hydraulic oils.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating wood and paper products?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for wood and paper products:

Recycled content office paper and paper products are specifically included in both Stanford's sustainable purchasing policy and sustainable purchasing guidelines.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating products and services in other commodity categories that the institution has determined to have significant sustainability impacts?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for other commodity categories:

As mentioned above, Procurement has begun to evaluate sustainability within each of its spend categories. Through 2016, the categories evaluated have been Office Supplies, Med/Lab equipment, Hardware, and Travel. Opportunities have been uncovered in the Office Supplies category, in particular, since Stanford’s primary office supply vendor is Office Depot, who developed a proprietary Shades of Green rating system for its products. The Office of Sustainability has partnered with Procurement and Office Depot to determine how to best implement the Shades of Green methodology at Stanford and use the information to encourage the purchase of the most sustainable office supplies across campus. Paper and ink toner purchases have been identified as key opportunities through this collaboration.

For ink toner specifically, Procurement has worked with Office Depot to implement a toner recycling program, where Office Depot will pick up used toner cartridges for recycling at the same time that they make deliveries throughout campus buildings. This eliminates the need for an additional trip while also facilitating toner cartridge recycling across campus.

Finally, purchasing energy efficient products is also a major focus of Stanford’s sustainable purchasing program. For instance, Stanford’s sustainable purchasing policy and guidelines both specifically recommend compact fluorescent light bulbs (the guidelines pre-date cost-effective LEDs). Moreover, the equipment inventory conducted in 2014 revealed many other inefficient types of electronic appliances that could gradually be phased out through procurement policies, including personal printers, personal refrigerators (mini fridges), and fax machines. Through Stanford’s Green Labs program, the Office of Sustainability also works with Procurement to encourage the purchase of energy efficient ultra-low temperature freezers, which was one of the opportunities that emerged from the Med/Lab spend analysis referenced above. Information on the plug load equipment inventory and opportunities identified in the area of Procurement can be found here: https://sustainable.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/resource-attachments/plug_load_fact_sheet.pdf.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.