Overall Rating Platinum - expired
Overall Score 85.74
Liaison Moira Hafer
Submission Date June 28, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Stanford University
AC-11: Open Access to Research

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.00 / 2.00 Moira Hafer
Sustainability Specialist
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

How many of the institution’s research-producing divisions are covered by a published open access policy that ensures that versions of future scholarly articles by faculty and staff are deposited in a designated open access repository? (All, Some or None):
Some

Which of the following best describes the open access policy? (Mandatory or Voluntary):
Mandatory (or mandatory with a waiver option)

Does the institution provide financial incentives to support faculty members with article processing and other open access publication charges?:
Yes

A brief description of the open access policy, including the date adopted, any incentives or supports provided, and the repository(ies) used:

The Stanford Graduate School of Education passed an Open Access policy for all faculty in June 2008 and for all doctoral students in May 2013. These motions commit the faculty and students to making a copy of their peer-reviewed journal articles publicly and freely available through the Stanford GSE Open Archive. The motions exemplify the faculty and student’s commitment to sharing as widely as possible what they've been able to learn about education from their research and scholarship.The doctoral student motion received nearly unanimous support, with over 95% of votes cast in favor (voter turnout of 59%, meaning 56% of total students voted in favor). The open research is now stored in the Open Archive, a digital repository provided by the university to support the Graduate School of Education's Open Access Policy.

Stanford also has a university policy on Openness in Research, which prohibits secrecy among faculty and doctoral student research. While this is not a mandatory policy for open access per se, it does promote open access university-wide. The policy is published in the Research Policy Handbook. Stanford also maintains a central digital repository with 28,388 items to which faculty and students have voluntarily uploaded their research in order to provide open access. The university-wide digital repository is available here: https://sdr.stanford.edu/.

The Stanford Digital Repository is supported and maintained by Stanford Libraries. Stanford Libraries also support Open Access in other ways and provide incentives and information on Open Access publishing. For instance, Stanford Libraries hosts the Graduate School of Education's Open Archive, which is the institutional repository for the working papers, published articles, and other materials produced by the faculty, staff and students at the Graduate School of Education, discussed above. Additionally, in conjunction with the National Institute of Health Open Access mandate, Stanford's Lane Medical Library offers many tools to encourage Open Access publishing, which can all be found on their Open Knowledge site at: http://openknowledge.stanford.edu/. For example, Lane Medical Library hosts events, such as a presentation by PeerJ, an open Access publisher, a presentation by John Willinsky, Khosla Family Professor of Education at Stanford and Director of the Public Knowledge Project, and an Open Access Panel Discussion.

Finally, in Stanford's annual Copyright Reminder, the libraries advocate and provide information on open access publishing: https://library.stanford.edu/using/copyright-reminder/common-situations/publishing.


A copy of the institution's open access policy:
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The institution's open access policy:

STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION OPEN ACCESS MOTION
In recognition of its responsibility to make its research and scholarship as widely and publicly available as possible, the faculty of the Stanford Graduate School of Education is determined to take advantage of new technologies to increase access to its work among scholars worldwide, educators, policymakers, and the public. In support of greater openness in scholarly and educational endeavors, the faculty of the Graduate School of Education agree to the following policy:

Faculty members grant to the Stanford University permission to make publicly available their scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those articles. They grant to Stanford University a nonexclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to their scholarly articles, in any medium, and to authorize others to do the same, provided that the articles are properly attributed to the authors not sold for a profit. The policy will apply to all scholarly articles authored or co-authored while a faculty member of the Graduate School of Education, beginning with articles for which the publisher’s copyright agreement has yet to be signed. The Dean or the Dean’s designate will waive application of the policy upon written request from faculty who wish to publish an article with a publisher who will not agree to the terms of this policy (which will be presented to the publishers in the form of an addendum to the copyright agreement).

No later than the date of publication, faculty members will provide an electronic copy of the final version of the article at no charge to the appropriate representative of the Dean of Education’s Office, who will make the article available to the public in an open-access repository operated by Stanford University.

The Office of the Dean will be responsible for interpreting this policy, resolving disputes concerning its interpretation and application, and recommending policy changes to the Graduate School of Education from time to time. The policy will be reviewed after three years and a report presented on the policy to the Graduate School of Education.

Available at: https://openarchive.stanford.edu/faculty-motion

STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION STUDENT OPEN ACCESS MOTION
The students of the Stanford Graduate School of Education are committed to making their research and scholarship as widely and publicly available as possible. In recognition of the importance of access to knowledge, the students of the Stanford Graduate School of Education are determined to increase access to their work for scholars, educators, policymakers, and the public worldwide. In support of greater openness in scholarly and educational endeavors, the students of the Graduate School of Education agree to the following policy:

Students grant to the Stanford University permission to make publicly available their scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those articles. They grant to Stanford University a non-exclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to their scholarly articles, in any medium, and to authorize others to do the same, provided that the articles are properly attributed to the authors and not sold for a profit. The policy will apply to all scholarly articles authored or co-authored while a student of the Graduate School of Education, beginning with articles for which the publisher’s copyright agreement has yet to be signed. On a publisher’s refusal to agree to the terms of this policy (as presented to the publishers in the form of an addendum to the copyright agreement), the student is able to waive this policy by uploading the bibliographic details for the article, along with a note on the publisher's refusal, to the public open-access repository operated by Stanford University.

No later than the date of publication, students will upload an electronic copy of the final version of the article to the open access repository operated by Stanford University.

Available at: https://openarchive.stanford.edu/student-motion

EXCERPT FROM STANFORD'S POLICY ON OPENNESS IN RESEARCH:
The rules adopted by the Academic Council on September 29, 1967, are hereby amended and, as amended, are reaffirmed:

(1) No research on a thesis or dissertation should be undertaken if, at the time the topic is set, there is any substantial possibility that it will lead to a secret thesis or dissertation.

(2) No secret thesis or dissertation should be accepted as the basis for a degree unless, in the judgment of the Committee on Graduate Studies, the imposition of secrecy could not reasonably have been foreseen until the work was so far advanced that modification of the thesis topic would have resulted in substantial inequity to the student.

(3) Scholarly activities not accessible for scrutiny by the entire Advisory Board should not be considered in connection with appointments, reappointments or promotions.

(4) The University should enter no contract and accept no grant to carry out research if the grant or contract restrains the freedom of the University to disclose the:

(4A)Existence of the contract or grant or,

(4B) General nature of the inquiry to be conducted or,

(4C) Identity of the outside contracting or granting entity or,

(4D) The research results;

provided that this clause shall not apply either (a) to anonymous gifts or grants that do not call for the performance of specified lines of inquiry, or (b) to research grants or contracts from individuals or non-governmental entities who request anonymity out of a justifiable motivation to protect individual privacy.

Available at: http://doresearch.stanford.edu/policies/research-policy-handbook/conduct-research/openness-research.


The website URL where the open access repository is available:
Estimated percentage of scholarly articles published annually by the institution’s faculty and staff that are deposited in a designated open access repository (0-100):
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A brief description of how the institution’s library(ies) support open access to research:
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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