Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Rich Walker
Submission Date April 22, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
OP-27: Rainwater Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Kevin Adkins
Sustainability Officer
Vice Chancellor for Administration
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution use Low Impact Development (LID) practices as a matter of policy or standard practice to reduce rainwater/stormwater runoff volume and improve outgoing water quality for new construction, major renovation, and other projects?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s Low Impact Development (LID) practices:

To Southern Illinois University Edwardsville storm water is a resource; as
such, it is the University’s mission to teach, advise, develop, and encourage good
management of stormwater in a manner that will promote a healthy environment
and thriving communities.
Keep dumpsters and other containers
securely closed to help keep rain from
washing away pollutants.
Avoid washing grit and grime into the
storm drainage system. Instead, pick
up litter, sweep areas and dispose of
sweepings in garbage. Use absorbent
materials to absorb oil. Dispose of
hazardous waste properly.
GOOD STORAGE PRACTICES
Read and follow handling instructions
for all the materials you store.
Regularly remove all sediment and
debris from storage area.
Place materials inside rigid, durable,
water‐tight and rodent‐proof containers
with tightfitting covers. Make sure the
containers are spill‐ proof. Inspectfor
leaks and perform routine
maintenance.
Store materials inside a building or
build a covered area that is paved and
designed to preventrunofffrom
entering storm drains.
Cover materials stored outdoors with
sheets or plastic to prevent exposure to
rainfall.
Store hazardous materials according to
federal, state, and localrequirements.
SPILL PREVENTION AND CLEAN‐UP
Take the time to use precautions to
prevent spills.
Sweep and dry mop frequently to reduce
the amount of dirt,fluids, and other
residues that accumulate where you
work.
Create a spill prevention and cleanup
plan.
Clean up spills promptly ifthey do
happen.
Clean up without water whenever
possible by sweeping or wiping.
Keep absorbents and rags on hand to
help clean up spills.
PROPERTYMAINTENANCE
Avoid using detergents in pressure
washing.
Clean catch basins and storm drains
regularly.
Take steps to prevent erosion before
clearing vegetation from land.
Use only the righttype and amount of
fertilizers, herbicides, and/or pesticides
for your landscaping. Avoid applying
them during rainy weather.
Do not over water. Excess water
transports pollutants off your property
into the storm drain system.
ELIMINATING IMPROPER DISCHARGE
TO STORM DRAINS
Eliminate illicit connections.
Sweep parking lots, storage areas and
driveways atleast once per month to
collect dirt, waste, and debris. Rinse the
lot with water only (no soap) after
sweeping it, using a rag or absorbent
materialto properly dispose of
automotive fluids and oil spots.
Don’t allow wash waterfrom engine or
equipment washing to enter a storm
drain.
Store and contain liquid materials in
such a mannerthatifthe tank is
ruptured,the contents will not
discharge,flow or be washed into
the storm drainage system.
THANK YOU FOR
HELPING
For Additionalinformation Contact:
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Office of EmergencyManagement and Safety
StormwaterManage


Has the institution adopted a rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, or strategies that mitigate the rainwater runoff impacts of ongoing campus operations through the use of green infrastructure? :
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, and/or strategies for ongoing campus operations:
A brief description of any rainwater harvesting employed by the institution:
---

Rainwater harvested directly and stored/used by the institution, performance year:
---

A brief description of any rainwater filtering systems employed by the institution to treat water prior to release:
---

A brief description of any living or vegetated roofs on campus:

Green roofs have been growing in popularity in the U.S. because of their many environmental advantages. SIUE engineers and scientists are evaluating the environmental benefits of green roof technology and the performance of various green roof materials and techniques.

The research, which is part of the University’s Green Roof Environmental Evaluation Network (GREEN), is taking place on top of the School of Engineering Building, as well as at a ground-level field site. Research conducted by SIUE students and faculty has the potential to influence green technology and future environmental trends.

GREEN is a collaborative initiative lead by the School of Engineering, the Environmental Sciences Program and the Department of Environmental Sciences. The effort involves local St. Louis companies Green Roof Blocks and Jost Greenhouses and other environmental industry leaders and universities.

Susan Morgan, civil engineering professor and chair of that department, works closely with students to study the quantity and quality of the storm water runoff. “While there is the potential for green roofs to add pollutants from the growth media and fertilizer, our data so far shows little contamination,” she said. “There is, however, a significant reduction in the amount of runoff from green roofs compared to traditional roofs.”

Serdar Celik, SIUE assistant professor of mechanical engineering, studies the thermal benefits of having a green roof. “The green roof acts as insulation,” he said. “By having a green roof, the plants promote less building heat gain in summer and less building heat loss in winter.” Celik is quantifying the R-values, or thermal resistance, of different growth media-vegetation-fertilizer combinations.

According to Bill Retzlaff, associate professor of biological sciences and chair of that department, a green roof on the SIUE Engineering Building lowers the roof temperature in the summertime as much as 70 degrees. “The cost savings from green roofs can be significant,” Retzlaff said. “The city of Toronto, Canada, has estimated that they could reduce annual heating and cooling costs by $1 billion if six percent of the rooftops were green roofs.”

One of these important partnerships is with Ittner, a St. Louis-based architectural firm. The firm recently completed a green roof project on the balcony of SIUE’s Rendleman Hall, which is now being used by the building’s employees as a daily retreat for breaks and lunch. This modular block system, like the one that rests on SIUE’s Student Success Center roof, will be tested by SIUE’s biological sciences and civil engineering departments for green benefits.


A brief description of any porous (i.e. permeable) paving employed by the institution:
---

A brief description of any downspout disconnection employed by the institution:
---

A brief description of any rain gardens on campus:

A project was funded by the Sustainability Advisory Group to construct a rain garden in the
detention area of parking lot E. This would help slow the flow of the water decreasing
erosion and filter out many harmful chemicals.


A brief description of any stormwater retention and/or detention ponds employed by the institution:

A project was funded by the Sustainability Advisory Group to construct a rain garden in the
detention area of parking lot E. This would help slow the flow of the water decreasing
erosion and filter out many harmful chemicals.


A brief description of any bioswales on campus (vegetated, compost or stone):
---

A brief description of any other rainwater management technologies or strategies employed by the institution:

To Southern Illinois University Edwardsville storm water is a resource; as
such, it is the University’s mission to teach, advise, develop, and encourage good
management of stormwater in a manner that will promote a healthy environment
and thriving communities.
Keep dumpsters and other containers
securely closed to help keep rain from
washing away pollutants.
Avoid washing grit and grime into the
storm drainage system. Instead, pick
up litter, sweep areas and dispose of
sweepings in garbage. Use absorbent
materials to absorb oil. Dispose of
hazardous waste properly.
GOOD STORAGE PRACTICES
Read and follow handling instructions
for all the materials you store.
Regularly remove all sediment and
debris from storage area.
Place materials inside rigid, durable,
water‐tight and rodent‐proof containers
with tightfitting covers. Make sure the
containers are spill‐ proof. Inspectfor
leaks and perform routine
maintenance.
Store materials inside a building or
build a covered area that is paved and
designed to preventrunofffrom
entering storm drains.
Cover materials stored outdoors with
sheets or plastic to prevent exposure to
rainfall.
Store hazardous materials according to
federal, state, and localrequirements.
SPILL PREVENTION AND CLEAN‐UP
Take the time to use precautions to
prevent spills.
Sweep and dry mop frequently to reduce
the amount of dirt,fluids, and other
residues that accumulate where you
work.
Create a spill prevention and cleanup
plan.
Clean up spills promptly ifthey do
happen.
Clean up without water whenever
possible by sweeping or wiping.
Keep absorbents and rags on hand to
help clean up spills.
PROPERTYMAINTENANCE
Avoid using detergents in pressure
washing.
Clean catch basins and storm drains
regularly.
Take steps to prevent erosion before
clearing vegetation from land.
Use only the righttype and amount of
fertilizers, herbicides, and/or pesticides
for your landscaping. Avoid applying
them during rainy weather.
Do not over water. Excess water
transports pollutants off your property
into the storm drain system.
ELIMINATING IMPROPER DISCHARGE
TO STORM DRAINS
Eliminate illicit connections.
Sweep parking lots, storage areas and
driveways atleast once per month to
collect dirt, waste, and debris. Rinse the
lot with water only (no soap) after
sweeping it, using a rag or absorbent
materialto properly dispose of
automotive fluids and oil spots.
Don’t allow wash waterfrom engine or
equipment washing to enter a storm
drain.
Store and contain liquid materials in
such a mannerthatifthe tank is
ruptured,the contents will not
discharge,flow or be washed into
the storm drainage system.
THANK YOU FOR
HELPING
For Additionalinformation Contact:
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Office of EmergencyManagement and Safety
StormwaterManage


The website URL where information about the institution’s rainwater management initiatives, plan or policy is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.