Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 61.36
Liaison Rachael Wein
Submission Date March 2, 2020

STARS v2.2

Smith College
AC-2: Learning Outcomes

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.61 / 8.00 Rachael Wein
Assistant Director of Sustainability
CEEDS
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Has the institution adopted one or more sustainability learning outcomes that apply to the entire student body or, at minimum, to the institution's predominant student body?:
No

Which of the following best describes the sustainability learning outcomes?:
Sustainability-supportive

A list of the institution level sustainability learning outcomes:

At Smith College, learning outcomes are specified at the departmental level. In an organizational structure that is flat by design, with strong faculty governance, departmental relevance is supported and maintained by bridging the institution’s core competencies and strategic themes throughout the curriculum. As a result, learning outcomes are established at the departmental level, not the institutional level. Departmental learning outcomes guarantee that all Smith students have these essential capacities:
Essential Capacities
Every student, during her time at Smith, is encouraged to reflect on her development in a number of essential capacities that should guide her education, both in and beyond the classroom.
Ability to draw upon and convey knowledge
Ability to engage across difference in place, culture and time
Creativity, curiosity and innovation
Critical and analytical thinking
Resilience and resourcefulness
Self-awareness as a learner

Departmental Learning Outcomes can be found at:
https://www.smith.edu/about-smith/institutional-research/learning-goals


Total number of graduates from degree programs:
616

Number of graduates from degree programs that require an understanding of the concept of sustainability:
47

A brief description of how the figure above was determined:

Numbers of graduates from Environmental Science & Policy major, the Climate Change and Sustainable Food Concentrations, and the Marine Science & Policy minor were totaled for the 2018-19 academic year.

The total number of graduates from degree programs excludes the few graduate-level graduates at Smith.


A list of degree programs that require an understanding of the concept of sustainability:

The Environmental Science and Policy (ES&P) major is designed for students with interests in the environment and sustainability and a commitment to scientifically based problem solving and policy analysis. The objectives of the major are to prepare students to transcend disciplinary boundaries; combine analytical and communication skills with a well-rounded understanding of the environment; and translate this knowledge into meaningful action and innovative solutions. Four integration courses form the intellectual and organizational core of the major. Each course brings together frameworks, proficiencies, and knowledge from natural and social sciences in an explicitly integrative fashion to explore and analyze important environmental topics at local, regional, national and global levels. Additional introductory courses provide breadth in the natural and social sciences, humanities and policy and statistics and introduce students to fundamental aspects of disciplines important to understanding human-environment interactions. Students gain depth of knowledge by choosing a coherent sequence of electives with a clear environmental focus. Students are strongly encouraged to engage in environmentally oriented internships, independent research, or study away opportunities.

Majors in Environmental GeoSciences prepare for a career in a field that addresses environmental issues. In addition to a range of courses within the department, environmental geosciences majors take classes in chemistry, ecology and environmental policy.

Many world leaders, scientists and analysts agree that climate change is the most significant challenge the world faces today. The Climate Change Concentration lets students engage in an interdisciplinary exploration of this critical topic. Through two internships, students immerse themselves in work that is integral to sustaining life on Earth, investigating the exciting connections among key issues, including:
-the science of global climate change, including atmospheric physics and radiative transfer
-socioeconomic and historical factors affecting climate change, including the Industrial Revolution and world economic models
-political and governmental aspects of climate change, such as the Kyoto Protocol and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
-psychological factors affecting personal behavior, including political affiliation and education
-cultural reflections of and influences on global climate change, including literature and the arts

The Sustainable Food Concentration lets students engage in an interdisciplinary exploration of food and the many issues involved in sustainability. Whether you are interested in global food distribution systems, the economics of agriculture, food cultures around the world, agriculture policy or the various ways that gender and food intersect, you can explore your interests in a cohesive, directed and exciting way.
By studying sustainable food, students can capitalize on the many opportunities for engagement around food and agriculture-related initiatives happening right in their own backyard. The Sustainable Food Concentration helps you put theory into practice, gaining hands-on experience in a topic that is integral to both your surrounding community and the global community.


Documentation supporting the figure reported above (upload):
---

Do the figures reported above cover one, two, or three academic years?:
One

Percentage of students who graduate from programs that require an understanding of the concept of sustainability:
7.63

Website URL where information about the sustainability learning outcomes is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

At Smith College, learning outcomes are specified at the departmental level. In an organizational structure that is flat by design, with strong faculty governance, departmental relevance is supported and maintained by bridging the institution’s core competencies and strategic themes throughout the curriculum. As a result, learning outcomes are established at the departmental level, not the institutional level. Departmental learning outcomes guarantee that all Smith students have these essential capacities:
Essential Capacities
Every student, during her time at Smith, is encouraged to reflect on her development in a number of essential capacities that should guide her education, both in and beyond the classroom.
Ability to draw upon and convey knowledge
Ability to engage across difference in place, culture and time
Creativity, curiosity and innovation
Critical and analytical thinking
Resilience and resourcefulness
Self-awareness as a learner

Departmental Learning Outcomes can be found at:
https://www.smith.edu/about-smith/institutional-research/learning-goals

Total excludes the School of Social Work, a graduate program that occurs during the summer, and is smaller than the minimum threshold articulated by STARS for this credit.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.